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Posts from May 2018

Why Our Jacksonville Statement on Gospel Unity & Racial Reconciliation Is Needed

Approximately three months ago, I was asked to co-chair a team of pastors in our city (Jacksonville, Florida) by our Lead Missional Strategist of the Jacksonville Baptist Association. Along with Pastor Elijah Simmons of Mt. Horeb Baptist Church in Jacksonville, we agreed to serve with these brothers in order to put together a document we hoped would never be needed, but clearly is. 

The team of pastors who agreed to serve on this Gospel Unity Team, in addition to Pastor Simmons and me, include:

Why The Need?

Clearly racial tension in America is high. You would think that we would be beyond this by now, right? While division among many based on race continues within the world, the grievous reality is that the church falls prey to the enemy's divisive tactics as well. The landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964 was necessary and an answer to prayer for many. Yet, we are reminded that while needed, right political action does not change the heart. Only God does that. 

Sadly, many (not all) churches and church leaders remained silent during the 1950s and 1960s and beyond as racial equality was debated in the public forum (and sadly, many of those "debates" were one-sided and sinfully devised, especially when "separate but equal" was considered normal and fire hoses and dogs were on the debate teams.)

"But this is 2018, things are better now." I'm sure that's true comparatively. I would never wish to insult those who lived through the most terrible times most only now read about his history books or at memorials. While things may be better, for some, we are far from a place where we can sit back and say "done." There's much work yet to accomplish and as Christians, the church must never again find itself muzzled when the fullness of the gospel must be proclaimed.

Much has been said, more eloquently and from stronger perspectives than I can offer, but when churches and pastors serving side-by-side in a city like ours begin to question even being in the same network due to what others (pastors and Christians) have posted on social media, shared, or commented upon that does nothing for the work of God's Kingdom and actually elevates division, it is no longer an option to remain silent.

That's why this statement on gospel unity is needed.

The SBC Statements

As Southern Baptists, we own a rich, but also troubling legacy. Much has been written about our founding. Repentant statements and resolutions have been made over the years. All needed, but as we all know, resolutions without action leave us empty. At this coming Southern Baptist Convention in June, another resolution will be presented. The statement to be presented is available here in its entirety.  If brought to the floor for a vote, I plan to affirm this statement. 

Yet, for many local church members, national statements may remain unheard.

What about our city?

What about our churches?

What do we believe regarding the racial tensions that exist?

More than that, what does the Bible reveal that we must hold to as truth?

Our statement gives clear, brief, and biblical answers to these questions. Our prayer is that this helps the local church stay on mission and that biblical unity in Christ not only occurs but remains. 

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Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

The Jacksonville Statement

Our statement was comprised following two months of meetings that included much prayer, conversation, "word-smithing," and considerations of how others would receive the message. The statement is now available at the Jacksonville Baptist Association website. We hope to soon offer a way for pastors and church members to sign their names to the statement as well. Our desire is to remove anything that promotes unclarity and to have this statement, rooted in God's inerrant Word, as our clear beliefs regarding needed gospel unity and racial reconciliation.

 

JACKSONVILLE STATEMENT ON GOSPEL UNITY 

RACIAL RECONCILIATION & THE JACKSONVILLE BAPTIST ASSOCIATION

“Therefore I, the prisoner in the Lord, urge you to live worthy of the calling you have received, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another in love, making every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace. There is one body and one Spirit—just as you were called to one hope at your calling—one Lord, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father of all, who is above all and through all and in all.”

- Ephesians 4:1-6 (CSB) -

Preamble

As evangelical Christians we acknowledge the reality that division and disunity are tools of the Enemy against the proliferation and spread of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Whether in families, local church bodies, neighboring churches, or even denominational entities, division has unfortunately been far too normative throughout church history.

Race, as commonly defined, refers to the various ethnicities, skin colors, and cultural heritages of human beings.  As evangelical Christians, we acknowledge the sinful divides among those of differing races that, at times, have been ignored or worse, excused within the church.

Reconciliation refers to the acknowledgement of human brokenness and the need for restoration to God through Jesus Christ (Colossians 1:20-23). In that he has reconciled humanity to himself, Christians are to be reconciled one to another, as children of God (2 Corinthians 5:18).

Great strides toward reconciliation occurred in the United States throughout the second half of the twentieth century. Yet, many continue to experience great division and painful separation due to ethnicity, cultural heritage, and/or race. While acknowledging much has been done to reconcile over recent decades, it is clear we have far to go.

Racial reconciliation for Christians is not solely, or even primarily, a political issue. Racial reconciliation for Christians is not merely a social justice issue. Racial reconciliation for Christians is not a public relations issue. Racial division is a sin issue. Therefore, racial reconciliation for Christians is a gospel unity issue.

To ignore sin is to affirm sin. Therefore, the pastors and leaders serving together in local churches and denominational entities have deemed it right, timely, and proper to present a clear, concise, biblically-founded, gospel-centered statement on gospel unity and racial reconciliation.

We believe that God has created all humanity in His image, male and female, with diverse skin tones and ethnic histories. As image-bearers we exist for the glory of God knowing that brings us the greatest good. We believe that salvation is found in Jesus Christ alone and that he died so that all may be saved (John 3:16). This offer is for all people and therefore, believing clarity on the issues of unity and racial reconciliation among believers, we offer the following affirmations and denials.

Article 1

WE AFFIRM that racial reconciliation is a gospel issue.

WE DENY that racial reconciliation is solely a social issue.

Matthew 15:21-28; Romans 1:16-17; Galatians 2:11-14; Ephesians 1:9-10, 13; 2:1-10, 13, 14-22; 3:3-5

Article 2

WE AFFIRM that the gospel alone offers hope and celebrates what the world fears.[1]

WE DENY that anything other than God and the full message of the gospel provide the hope and answers needed for humanity.

Psalm 28:7; 46:2-3; Lamentations 3:18; Matthew 12:21; Romans 8:24-25; 12:12; 1 Corinthians 13:13; Galatians 5:5; Hebrews 11:1, 7; Titus 2:11-14; 1 Peter 1:3, 1 John 3:3

Article 3

WE AFFIRM the biblical teaching of race references the differences between Jewish and non-Jewish peoples.

WE DENY the definition of race that creates a racial hierarchy based on inferred biological inferiority.

Leviticus 19:34; Acts 8:26-40; Romans 10:12; Ephesians 2:11-3:8; 1 Corinthians 12:13

Article 4

WE AFFIRM that Scripture teaches that Canaan was cursed by Noah due to his son Ham’s actions and that Cain was marked by God following the murder of his brother Abel.

WE DENY the curse of Canaan, often called the “Curse of Ham” and the mark of Cain, wrongly defined as a change of his skin color, refers to racial superiority or inferiority or has anything to do with differing skin tones of people.

Genesis 4:15; 9:20-25; 10:6

Article 5

WE AFFIRM that gospel-centered racial reconciliation is a pursuit of love for others flowing from Holy Spirit-empowered obedience of those who repent, believe in the cross and resurrection of Jesus by faith, and are justified by faith in Christ.[2]

WE DENY that ethnic diversity is synonymous with gospel-centered racial reconciliation.

Deuteronomy 10:17-19; Matthew 25; John 13:34; Acts 10:34-35; Galatians 3:28; Ephesians 4:32; James 2:8

Article 6

WE AFFIRM that God has designed marriage to be a covenantal, lifelong union between one man and one woman, regardless of race or ethnicity, for His glory, signifying the covenant love between Christ and His church.

WE DENY that marriage between a man and woman from differing racial or ethnic backgrounds to be sinful.

Genesis 2:23-24; Matthew 19:6; 2 Corinthians 6:14; Ephesians 5:22-23; 28-29; 31

Article 7

WE AFFIRM that pastors are uniquely called and positioned to shepherd their people toward gospel-centered racial reconciliation understanding that diversity is actually at the heart of the gospel.[3]

WE DENY that racial reconciliation can be forced upon others through human means.

John 21:15-17; Ephesians 4:11; 1 Timothy 3:1-7; 1 Peter 5:1-2

Article 8

WE AFFIRM the resolutions approved at Southern Baptist Convention annual meetings repenting of the sins of racism, most notably slave-holding, of past generations, and the need for continued work toward gospel-centered racial and ethnic unity.

WE DENY that the sins of past generations can be ignored and need not be acknowledged.

Nehemiah 9:1-2; Jeremiah 6:16; Daniel 9:16

Article 9

WE AFFIRM that all human beings are image bearers of God.

WE DENY the validity, truthfulness, and right standing of any and all organizations, groups, or individuals claiming racial superiority of any kind.

Genesis 1:26-27; Galatians 3:28; Ephesians 2:15; James 3:9; 1 Peter 2:17; Revelation 7:9

Article 10

WE AFFIRM that unity in our churches must be founded in Christ alone.

WE DENY that unity in our churches can be founded in political ideologies or national identity.

Psalm 20:7; 133:1; Daniel 2:21; Matthew 6:33; Romans 8:28; 13:1-8; 1 Corinthians 12:27; Ephesians 4:2; Philippians 2:3; 1 Peter 2:13-15; Jude 3; Revelation 7:9-12

_____

            [1] R. Albert Mohler, Jr., “The Root Cause of the Stain of Racism in the Southern Baptist Convention” in Removing the Stain of Racism from the Southern Baptist Convention, eds. Kevin M. Jones and Jarvis J. Williams (Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman, 2017), 5.

            [2] Jarvis J. Williams, “Biblical Steps Toward Removing the Stains of Racism in the Southern Baptist Convention” in Removing the Stain of Racism from the Southern Baptist Convention, eds. Kevin M. Jones and Jarvis J. Williams (Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman, 2017), 30.

            [3] Jamaal Williams, “Intentionally Cultivating Multicultural Churches,” Light Magazine, Winter 2016, 27.


The One Thing That Will Fix the Southern Baptist Convention

As a child and teenager attending my conservative Southern Baptist church, I knew nothing of the theological and organizational controversies taking place at the upper levels of the Southern Baptist Convention. The only inkling I had that something was not right in SBC-land was when I was living in Ohio as a junior higher and our pastor resigned from our church to attend seminary. At that point, I had to be educated on what seminary was. We lived in Dayton, Ohio and I heard someone in the church ask the pastor if he was going to attend The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (SBTS) in Louisville, Kentucky. That would make sense logistically since Louisville is only about three hours away. Our pastor said there was no way he could attend SBTS and that he would be enrolling in Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (SWBTS) in Fort Worth, Texas. He explained something related to theology and not agreeing with what was happening at SBTS. I really didn't know what he was talking about. (Thankfully, SBTS is now a highly recommended conservative, biblically-grounded SBC seminary. I am currently studying for my doctorate there.)

My family soon moved to Fort Worth as well when my dad was transferred there. Following high school and four years in college, I surrendered to God's pastoral call into full-time vocational ministry and enrolled at SWBTS. 

I had been an active Southern Baptist my entire life, but the denominational politics, the conservative resurgence, and other elements of SBC life were basically unknown to me. I just knew that I loved Jesus. I wanted to serve him. I felt called. I wanted to learn. I wanted to be used by God. And, I knew pastors and leaders who recommended SWBTS as my next step. 

Those years at SWBTS were wonderful for me. My love for SWBTS makes recent events more grievous for me.

My naïveté regarding SBC politics soon melted as a student at SWBTS. I began to understand the need for a conservative resurgence and discovered that much of that process had already happened as this was the early 1990s and the shift was now seemingly inevitable. For that, I remain grateful. 

The conservative resurgence was needed and I am thankful for those who did what must be done in order for it to happen. Yet we know that there was a great cost for this turn. I affirm what Dr. Albert Mohler, President of SBTS has stated...

The American denominational landscape has experienced significant shifts in recent times, but one major story stands out among them all—the massive redirection of the Southern Baptist Convention. America's largest evangelical denomination, the Southern Baptist Convention was reshaped, reformed, and restructured over the last three decades, and at an incredibly high cost.

For years, the SBC made the news. This was due to the conflict within our ranks. Unity was a concept sought, but not experienced. 

Then, after conservatives took leadership, things settled down a bit. Those who would not remain in the SBC left, forming other organizations and networks. The annual meetings were not as divisive and dramatic. The only big surprise at annual meetings for years seemed to center on what Pastor Wiley Drake may say when he found opportunity to speak in the open forum at one of the microphones. 

Sbcpeople

Then, things began to be shaken up.

Political viewpoints partnered with racial statements by some, either in hallways or on the microphones, left many wondering where their place was in the SBC. Presidential elections for the most part were not dramatic. In many cases, we just had two conservatives running against each other. There for years a sense that those who were instrumental in the conservative resurgence would "get their turn" and be nominated with expectation to be elected as SBC president. For the most part, this happened (well, except when Dr. Frank Page was elected in 2005 and 2006.) 

Questions

For the first time in years, I now have church members asking what we are going to do as Southern Baptists.

I have church members and friends asking me who I will vote for as president this year. In the past, if anyone asked anything of me regarding the convention it was "Are you going to the SBC this year?"

I have a number of people asking my take on what just happened this week at my alma mater regarding Dr. Paige Patterson. I'm asked what I would do if a woman came to me after being physically assaulted by her husband (easy answer - call the cops.)

Questions now come regarding racial issues and social justice.

Questions about the news stories regarding the aforementioned Dr. Page have come. 

There are many questions, and as we have already seen earlier this week, Baptist pastors are not immune to letting anger and fear lead to wrong statements and offensive social media posts. 

A Reckoning in the SBC

It is clear there is something wrong in my SBC. It is sad. It is humiliating. It is embarrassing. It is not to be ignored.

Dr. Albert Mohler wrote a poignant article about this earlier this week. Full article is here. Of all that Dr. Mohler said, this stuck out to me:

Judgment has now come to the house of the Southern Baptist Convention. The terrible swift sword of public humiliation has come with a vengeance. There can be no doubt that this story is not over.

Sadly, I agree.

So, Now What?

Here's what I know will NOT fix the SBC...

  • A resolution won't fix our problems.
  • A high-level political strategy won't fix our problems.
  • Meetings with high-ranking politicians won't fix our problems.
  • Finely-crafted press releases won't fix our problems.
  • Ignoring and excusing the sins of others, even those we love, appreciate, and respect, won't fix our problems.
  • Venerating SBC warriors and heroes won't fix our problems.
  • Shifting away from biblical complementarianism won't fix our problems.
  • Bowing to cultural mandates won't fix our problems.
  • Standing proudly as self-righteous American evangelicals won't fix our problems.

This list could go on and on, but this blog post is already too long, so I'll slow down. 

Our problems are not public relations problems.

We know what we need and it's not a tepidly defined revival (though true revival is needed.) We need to submit to God during these days.

We need the right man, his man, as our SBC president and we need SBC messengers to vote for that man, not against another. Each man running for president, as I have stated before, is not only qualified, but godly. One has preached at our church. The other has partnered with our church in helping send a church planter to a nearby city. Qualifications of these men are not questioned. Yet, for such a time as this, I believe we will be well served having J.D. Greear as our SBC president. I was sent this link earlier today by a friend and appreciate Greear's timely and wise words. 

Yet, even J.D. Greear (or Ken Hemphill) won't fix our problems.

We, the SBC, have been humiliated and this has been done by God, I believe. Humbled may be a better word, but it feels humiliating.

God does not need the SBC and we must acknowledge this. <Tweet This>

What embarrassing event will happen next? What will be revealed? I don't know. In all honesty, I don't believe we have dealt well with our most recent embarrassment, so we definitely are not positioned for another.

The One Thing

Yet, God has given us an option. We don't need to ask what God's will is for the SBC. We need to read His Word once more (not that we haven't been) just  to remind ourselves what his will is (it hasn't changed,) then move back "into it."

How does that happen? One repentant heart at a time. Repentance that leads to transformation, to change, to humble service to our Lord, to the mission of Kingdom work.

Friends, brothers, sisters - we have sinned. Since we are the SBC, we are complicit. The wages of sin remain the same as they always have. We must turn from the ways of pride, selfishness, idolatry, and more, and return humbled to the Lord. I don't believe he is through with the SBC, but we must remember that he does not need us. We need him.

That One Thing? Repentance.

 

 


Can Anything Good Come From Dallas This Summer? - The Southern Baptist Convention 2018

Every summer, messengers from Southern Baptist churches throughout the world gather in predetermined cities for our annual meeting. This year it will be in Dallas, Texas in June. For those outside the SBC tribe, this is basically a two-day business meeting where elections for denominational officers take place, reports from denominational entities occur, along with other meetings and some powerful times of worship, preaching, and fellowship. 

The SBC annual meetings often make the news for things done or left undone. Then, the news cycle shifts and for the most part, outside the member churches and denominational entities, others in the culture pay little attention to SBC happenings. I have been to numerous meetings where the consensus going in from many attendees has been "Well, there's nothing controversial on the docket this year, so this should be a pretty low-key gathering." Those sentiments are often shed once business starts. Inevitably, there are some questions asked from the floor or things said from the podium that trend on Twitter and other social media outlets and in today's instant-media world, these get picked up by others to make the SBC newsworthy once more to a culture that varies from not caring to being totally opposed to evangelical Christianity and a biblical worldview.

I am concerned, not worried, at what I am seeing take place in our denomination and member churches and entities leading up to our annual meeting. There are some key decisions to be made this year and some will take place prior to our annual gathering, others at the annual meeting, and still others following.

For decades, a semblance of "controversy" has defined the SBC. Depending on one's perspective, the latest large-scale conflict began in 1979 with what has been termed the Conservative Resurgence. In full disclosure, I am glad this resurgence took place. It was needed. 

There have been other issues over the years, and as we move toward our 2018 meeting in Dallas, there is much stirring in the SBC world.

I remember the good old days (about three months ago) when the only thing being discussed and debated was the SBC presidential election between J.D. Greear and Ken Hemphill. Now, there are other things talked about and discussed (online, in the mainstream press, and among Baptist leaders and church members) that cause many to see 2018 as a potentially conflicted and controversial meeting.

Questions regarding leadership of denominational entities are on the front-burner. Continued (needed) discussion on racial reconciliation and unity moves to the front as well. Questions centered on sexism and abuse have produced petitions and will become discussion topics as well. Trustee meetings for different entities are happening. One friend lamented to me "These are dark days for the SBC." Perhaps, but let us not lose hope. For such a time as this, SBC messengers will gather for the glory of God and the good of the church.

There will be difficult decisions ahead. Some will be made by individuals, others by trustees, still others by the full body of messengers in attendance. 

We often say "The world is watching" as a reminder to ensure we say and do the right things. Yet, I am reminded that we have a more important audience than the world. God is not only watching, but guiding and if these are "dark days" then we need to be sure we walk in the Light. <Tweet This>

Screenshot 2018-05-10 13.19.14
SBC Annual Meeting 2018 - Dallas, Texas

I fully believe that all the issues being discussed must be discussed. Therefore, I call for all SBC church members and messengers to pray now and continually (and strategically) as we move toward our gathering in Dallas this June 12-13 (with the Pastor's Conference on June 11-12).

Presidential Election

Here's a truth that many may struggle to believe. IT IS POSSIBLE to actually like both candidates for SBC president. J.D. Greear and Ken Hemphill are both godly men who will be officially nominated for the one-year term of SBC president by other godly men. I like both of these candidates. I appreciate both men's service to the Lord and his Kingdom and to our denomination. Each will lead well if elected. While some love creating division and seek to utilize ungodly tools to tear down others, I will not.

I have only one vote, I will vote as I believe God has led me to do. I plan to place my vote for J.D. Greear to be SBC president. My vote is NOT a "no vote" for Dr. Hemphill. I believe Dr. Greear is God's man for these days for our denomination. 

Greear-Hemphill
Dr. J.D. Greear (L) and Dr. Ken Hemphill (R)

Denominational Leadership

The trustees of the Executive Committee have been meeting and have a heavy task ahead of them following the departure of Dr. Frank Page. Whether a recommendation for president of the EC is presented in June or not, these men and women need our prayers.  I affirm these recommendations for the next president as written on the Baptist 21 blog - "8 Suggestions for the Next President of the SBC Executive Committee"

The International Mission Board trustees are prayerfully considering new leadership upon the departure of Dr. David Platt back to local church ministry. While this, from my perspective, does not seem controversial, it is a vital decision for one of our major denominational boards. 

As you are likely aware, the trustees of Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary will be gathering at the end of May for a specially-called meeting. It is no small undertaking to call such a meeting and the cost of hosting such is high. Therefore, it is clear that this meeting will result in some decisions surrounding Dr. Paige Patterson and the presidency of SWBTS. I have no insight into the inner-workings of these trustee meetings, but I know that those who serve have a heaviness of responsibility upon them. 

Regardless where you stand on any of the decisions being made or potentially to be made, it is clear that "the times they are a changin'" and we (SBCers) better do well and right.

Racial Reconciliation

It amazes me that in 2018 the issues of racial division seems to be growing, not lessening in our nation. Yet, I shouldn't have been surprised. Sin remains. Latent sin is awakened when others stoke the fires of division. On the heels of the MLK50 Conference (which I gladly attended) and with last year's SBC in Phoenix where we (messengers) stumbled badly on a resolution focused on racial reconciliation, we have another resolution being offered up for vote. My friend Cam Triggs, Pastor of Grace Alive Church in Orlando, is one of the signatories of the resolution. I affirm the wording of this resolution and pray that we will overwhelmingly approve it as SBC messengers. You can read it here.

Flesh crayon

Can Anything Good Come From This?

The question reeks with foreboding. Yet, I believe that great good can result from our gathering this summer in Dallas. For two days, we will be gathering for worship, preaching, teaching, and fellowship at the SBC Pastors Conference led by my friend, Dr. H.B. Charles, Jr. I know he and his planning team have prayed over and prepared for this weekend gathering. The Word will be preached boldly. God will be glorified. The church will be benefited. More than that, I believe we, the attendees will be affirmed in areas, convicted in areas, and renewed for that which is to come (the next days' annual meeting and the weekly gatherings in local churches throughout the SBC.)

Screenshot 2018-05-10 13.24.48
SBC Pastors Conference 2018

I believe that we will unify on that which matters most - the gospel of Jesus Christ. It is not that we have ignored this, but in times of trial and controversy, we are thrust back to the basics. Political positioning, polity negotiations, clear talking points, or any other human talent or skill will not unite us for that which we must do. It is in Christ alone we find our unity and solid ground. Will everyone leaving the meetings be in full agreement regarding decisions made? Well, no...we are Baptists, and more than that, we are human. Yet, in the essentials, we must be unified. May we "fulfill our ministry" to "testify" to the world the unchanging, life-saving, message of the gospel. 

We are being watched. Let's just be sure we're focusing on the right audience.