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Posts from April 2020

A Call To Prayer for Our SBC Seminaries

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted every aspect of our lives. I am reminded daily when I receive updates and prayer requests regarding the health challenges and hospitalizations of church members, the reported deaths of those in our communities and families, and the varied other challenges related to employment, education, and relational health. The list is extensive.

As a Southern Baptist pastor, I receive updates regularly from leaders in our local association, state convention, mission boards, and other denominational offices and entities. I appreciate the information and am thankful for the men and women serving the Lord and our churches in these offices and entities.

Our Seminaries

We have six excellent seminaries as Southern Baptists. These schools have served Southern Baptists well for many years. There have been challenges, changes, restructuring, and shifts throughout the years. Today we have six seminaries providing solid, biblical, doctrinally-sound guidance for men and women called of God into ministry. In addition to graduate level degrees, some offer undergraduate degrees in their respective colleges.

When COVID-19 forced most all schools to close and shift to online, distance-learning only, our seminaries made the proper adjustments. Yet, the challenges remain.

Dr. Albert Mohler, President of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (SBTS,) recently published an article delineating the changes made at SBTS in order to continue offering courses, degrees, and provide for staff and students. The changes were difficult and unexpected by many. Nevertheless, these are unexpected times (from a human perspective.) Click here for article.

It is my great concern for each of our seminaries at this time. While some see this as an opportune time to critique unnecessarily our seminaries and the men chosen to lead our institutions, I believe our needed and primary response as faithful believers and Southern Baptists is to pray for these men and the health of our schools.

These are our schools. 

Last Sunday (April 26, 2020) was a day on the denominational calendar emphasizing our Cooperative Program (CP.) I am so thankful for the CP and the faithful, generous giving Southern Baptists have historically shown.

As a graduate of two of our seminaries (Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary - 1993, and The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary - 2018) and pastor of a church with staff, church planters, and missionaries with degrees from each of our six seminaries, I am so thankful for the education provided and the resources available through CP.

Call to Prayer - Beginning Friday, May 1 at 11am EDT

Pastors praying for seminary presidents copy

Some will say "Who are you to call Southern Baptists to prayer?" Well...no one, really. Just a pastor believing that God desires we do this. Perhaps (and there's a really good possibility of this) he just wants me to pray for these men more intently. Nevertheless, I would like more to join me.

I have contacted the presidents of each of our seminaries and have asked individual local church pastors who are either graduates of each seminary or closely connected to join me on a Zoom call for a time of pastoral prayer for our seminaries and the presidents.

I will be premiering these prayer videos each weekday, beginning Friday, May 1, 2020 on our church's YouTube channel, Facebook page, and Twitter account. These clips will be shareable and I hope that many other Southern Baptists will join us in prayer each of these days for about fifteen minutes.

Why Do This?

Like others, I have been thinking about all the ways our church and others have been impacted by the pandemic. In the midst of this forced pause for many, I see God at work. I am not fearful. I am just praying for wisdom for decisions I must make as the pastor of the church and the leadership I must offer, as the under-shepherd of this flock. It can be overwhelming, especially if I slide into relying on my own ingenuity, ideas, and thoughts. 

In other words, I know I need wisdom and I cannot generate that. It is a gift from God. I know I lack wisdom in this area. I have never pastored during a pandemic (and neither has anyone else I know.)

If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask God, who gives generously to all without reproach, and it will be given him. - James 1:5 (ESV)

Thankfully, I know brothers and sisters who are praying for me. In addition to my request for wisdom, others are interceding as well. 

I know there are other denominational entities and conventions across the nation and world needing our prayers. I know there are other leaders needing prayer. We need to pray for them as well. This call to prayer is not meant to elevate one group over another. It is just that having one staff person set to graduate from Southeastern in May and others looking to move toward getting degrees in the future, our schools continue to come to my mind.

I truly enjoyed and benefited from my years in seminary and appreciate all who poured their lives into ensuring we have these schools and that they are worthy places to recommend others to attend.

When I reached out the seminary presidents, I explained that I was simply a local pastor desiring to initiate a time of prayer for them and the schools. I need wisdom in these days. I know they do as well. I asked local pastors to lead simply because I believe in the local church and know these pastors love these seminary presidents and seminaries and have blessed by them personally.

I also assured each pastor and president that the only agenda for these meetings was prayer. Nothing more. Nothing less. No critiques. No trolling disguised as prayer. No puffing up. No putting down. Just prayer for wisdom and encouragement. 

Everyone needs a Barnabas every now and then.

So, please share the schedule and join in prayer. If you cannot join at the time when the prayer videos premiere, join at a time that works for your schedule. 

I believe in the power of prayer. I also believe that for me, at least, I sometimes talk more about prayer than I actually pray. So, by scheduling these prayers, I will do more than just talk about prayer for these men, I will intercede on their behalf. I hope you will as well.

Prayer for our Seminaries & Presidents Schedule:

These prayer videos will premiere on the following days:

______________

This call to prayer is not something scheduled by any denominational entity. It is a grass-roots call to prayer for our men leading our seminaries. Praying for every staff member, student, and family connected to our seminaries. I am thankful for these men being willing to join me online for this time of intercession. 


"Reset" by David Murray - Book Review

Burnout.

It is a concept that most men, regardless of vocation, understand.

We have all heard the warnings. We have heard, and even likely repeated some of the statements related to pacing oneself better for health living.

  • We know that we cannot continue "burning the candle at both ends." 
  • No one wants "He worked too hard for things that don't really matter" on their tombstone.
  • Climbing the ladder of success is fruitless when you realize years later the ladder was leaning against the wrong wall.
  • Success in life is not success when family is sacrificed.
  • "I wish I knew then what I know now" is a tragic theme for one's life, especially when you really did know then what would have helped now.

All these and more are true statements that I have heard, read, repeated, and even used in teachings of men's conferences and Bible studies.

Like many men, I agree with these realities while I continue to push harder, faster, forward...falsely believing that these are great concepts, but not things that affect me.

Then, all the sudden, you have a few more years (decades) behind you and you realize that to have a maximum number of years ahead requires some wise readjustments, or as David Murray calls, a reset.

David Murray's book Reset was published by Crossway in 2017. It is one of those books I purchased  a year or so ago. I placed it on my shelf in my office and categorized it on Goodreads as "Want to Read." 

David Murray (PhD, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) is professor of Old Testament and practical theology at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary. He is also a counselor, a regular speaker at conferences, and the author of Exploring the Bible. David is married to Shona.

Reset

When the COVID-19 pandemic began to change all our schedules, I went to my office at the church and gathered some books to bring home for some intentional pandemic reading. I have a stack of over twenty, but this book just stood out. I read the sub-title "Living a Grace-Paced Life in a Burnout Culture" and knew this was the time to slow down and check out Murray's book.

Have you ever read a book that seemed to be a bit too personal? I mean, it is as if the author is prying, going places you didn't expect? That's what soon was realized as I worked through Reset.

Repair Bays for Men

Murray takes the reader through a series of "repair bays" that bring to mind a garage not unlike those on the renovation television shows designed to take a beat up, classic car and return it to its former glory. The imagery works, for what man of a certain age does not long for the days when joints didn't ache, muscles weren't strained, hair was not grey (and actually was still attached to one's head,) and feeling "ten-feet tall and bullet-proof" were the norm?

This book is not some fluffy, surface-level, pop-psychological self-help guide. 

Murray goes to scripture to express and define ways that men often get off track, even when doing good or godly work. 

As Murray takes the reader through his repair bays, he writes not as one who looks down from the ivory tower simply giving opinions on how to live better, but as one who personally faced physical health issues related to stress and overwork as well as other man-made speed bumps. Therefore, his insight is from one who is on the journey as well, who has experienced the need and value of a reset and has helped other men do the same.

There are numerous passages and paragraphs that I highlighted in this book. Here are just a sampling of some that resonated with me:

Be cautious about seeking advice from someone who stands to lose if you need to slow down. (p. 44)

 

God put a special curse on men's work (Gen 3:17-19) to make sure that our idolizing of work would never fully satisfy. (p. 48)

 

(Regarding the need to rest and sleep well) What I do instead of sleep shines a spotlight on my idols, whether it be late-night football, surfing the internet, ministry success, or promotion. (p. 55)

 

Pastors seem to think that "Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. In it you shall do no work" (Ex 20:9-10) has an asterisk (*unless you're a pastor, in which case you must work seven days a week.) (p. 99)

 

Some men struggle to accept changes in their identities when they age, change jobs, experience ill health, or retire. (p. 120)

 

Remember, it's rarely one extra big thing but the addition of lots of little things that tends to overwhelm us, because it is much more difficult to say no to the little things. (p. 137)

 

The joy of the journey depends so much on who's riding with us. (p. 157)

These are just some of the clear statements that make this book a must-read for men, especially pastors. Yet, here is a warning–don't read this book just to complete another book. It is always a goal of mine to finish a book. In most cases, that is not a problem at all. I love to read and I love to complete a good book. Yet, in this case the intent of Reset is not just to be able to move the book from the "Want to Read" shelf on Goodreads to the "Read" shelf (though I did that.) The insight and steps needed to actually slow down, reset, and spend some needed time in the repair bays are vital.

I recommend Reset for my friends, pastors, and any men finding that they're running hard and fast, but fear they may be doing little more than running on fumes (i.e. burning out.) 

The book is available wherever you purchase books. The link for purchasing from the publisher, Crossway, is here

David and his wife Shona have also written the book Refresh: Embracing a Grace-Paced Life in a World of Endless Demands with women in our fast-paced culture in mind. It is available here.


"Don't Just Do Something, Stand There" - A Needed Reminder for Pastors During a Pandemic

The quote "Don't just do something, stand there" is an obvious play on words and meant to grab your attention.

This quote has been attributed to Dwight Eisenhower, Lewis Carroll, and even Clint Eastwood. For those interested in where the quote originated, click here.

As one of many pastors seeking to lead well during the current pandemic, I am facing totally new and challenging questions and circumstances. I know there are many facing much more than me, so I'm not seeking pity or putting myself in a category I do not deserve. I join a few weekly pastors meetings online and have found great insight and encouragement from my brothers.

I also join a few other ministry meetings online for times of prayer and insight. I have noticed something that is starting to be a trend.

Lightstock_78070_medium_david_tarkington

In the effort to do the right thing, many pastors (I'm one of them) are continually asking "What do I do next?" Often more things to do are determined based on what others are doing, or some great idea that worked elsewhere. 

There are certainly things to do.

There are churches to lead.

There are sheep to be shepherded.

That was true prior to the pandemic. It still is.

Yet, in this season where our churches are not functioning as we did prior, where online is now our default setting, where questions about how to restart and when hover over every pastor, there is something I have noticed missing.

Rest.

Sabbath.

Doing something by doing nothing.

It is counter-intuitive to most pastors.

We serve understanding the urgency of evangelism and the need for discipleship. One pastor even told me "I cannot afford to rest. If I do, who will do this work?"

I shared with him, "If you don't rest, you won't be doing this work either." 

I should take my own advice, it seems.

As I have been reading David Murray's excellent book Reset, this portion on page 99 ended up being highlighted... 

Pastors seem to think that "Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. In it you shall do no work" (Ex 20:9-10) has an asterisk (*unless you're a pastor, in which case you must work seven days a week.) 

Guilty as charged.

There is still work to do.

There is still a local church to pastor. 

There are plans to be made (and remade, and revised, and reworked.)

Yet, there is still a God who remains sovereign, in control, never tiring (but took a Sabbath as well,) who has called you and me to himself and to his service.

For the Busy Pastor

Rest in Christ.

Trust God. 

Go take a nap. Watch a movie with your family. Read a book. Play a board game with your kids. 

Rest.

Remember, resting is not laziness or slothfulness. Those are sinful. Resting is not. Resting is not refusing to do anything. There are six days for work. Rest in Christ, who is our sabbath, but don't forget to take some real time during the week (check your calendar in case you forget what day it is) and relax. Take a breath - a deep one - and stop.

Don't just do something. Stand there (or sit there, or even push that recliner back) and worship God in the midst of this global pause. 


Our Church Restart Requires More Planning Than Our Stopping

When the coronavirus pandemic hit and stay-at-home orders began, our church did what most others did. We moved to online services only and canceled numerous mid-week gatherings and previously scheduled ministry events.

Our biggest concern was serving our Lord while ensuring our church members and neighbors were safe. 

We are now a few weeks into this stay-at-home structure. As we move forward in planning, pastors are communicating weekly, ideas are being shared, churches are helping other churches with technology and resourcing, and plans are being made for the return to face-to-face meetings for worship and Bible study.

Not Forsaking the Assembly

We are very glad that we have the technology available that allows us to meet online and host Life Groups through Zoom and other group video conferencing. Yet, we know that online-only is just an option, not our best plan. Two-dimensional gatherings will never measure up to being together, in the same room, singing together, studying the Word of God together, and fulfilling the commands of Scripture.

And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near. - Hebrews 10:24–25 (ESV)

So, we are preparing now for the day (not the "Day" mentioned in Hebrews 10, though we do prepare for that as well) it will be allowed and safe for the church to gather together in the same room.

Planning-plan-adjusting-aspirations-concepts-ideas

Our plans are tentative, with no dates assigned. These plans have some elements unique to our church that will likely be adjusted as days go by. Yet, we believe it best to put together a plan so that we are not making knee-jerk decisions in the days ahead.

It did not take long for us to shut things down at the church (just a few days.) Our restart is requiring much more preparation. We are praying for God's clear guidance in this.

I was able to join a meeting with dozens of other pastors in our region today. Our city network leader (Lead Missional Strategist Bob Bumgarner of the Jacksonville Baptist Association) shared with our group a template developed by Lone Oak First Baptist Church (Pastor Dan Summerlin) in Paducah, Kentucky.  The Executive Pastor at LOFBC, Hank Garner is the architect of this plan.

I want to ensure that all who read this article know that our plan was not initially created by our church, but inspired by this one developed by Lone Oak FBC. 

We have shared and will be sharing this four-phase plan with our entire staff, deacons, and church members. While there are many questions that will be raised regarding details, dates, and processes, we are stating that we do not have that information at this time. What we do have is a plan to move back, in phases, to what will become our normal schedule of ministry and worship as a church.

Regarding Plans

We believe it is wise to have a plan in place for our restart, but we do not believe our plan precludes God's clear lead. These plans have not been made in fear, but in faith that God is leading us every step through this journey.

So, we plan, in prayer, by faith, surrendered fully to God's lead.

For those interested, here's a copy of our four-phase plan. I'm sure numerous churches have similar plans available (I know of one in Kentucky that does, certainly) but if our tentative plan can be helpful for you, download it, copy it, use it.

A PDF and Word version of the plan are available for you to download and use.

Screenshot 2020-04-22 07.06.00 Download FBCOP Phased Restart Plan (PDF)

Download FBCOP Phased Restart Plan (Word)


"God, Where Are You?" - Lamenting During a Pandemic

Perhaps one of the most ignored disciplines or practices in the church today is the lament. Our music, at least popular Christian music, tends to focus on the celebratory, joyous, positive-thinking themes. While certainly there should be worship music that does so, to ignore the reality of hardship and struggle in the lives of Christians leaves some to view Christianity, as it is often presented today as little more than positive thinking, pop-psychological mantras of "speaking goodness" into being. 

Mark Vroegop has written an excellent article titled "The Danger of Neglecting Lament in the Local Church" on the Crossway blog here. In this article (and his book Dark Clouds, Deep Mercy as well) Vroegop lays out the very real need for lamentation among the people of God.

As we live through the age of the COVID-19 pandemic, many are making statements regarding their circumstances and unfortunately, seem to be missing some very real truths along the journey.

Lonely-woman-human-person-alone-leave

Human nature leads us to lamenting in days like this. Sadly, the lamentations that many share about the circumstances of "stay-at-home" orders and pseudo-quarantines in no way compare to the lamenting God leads his children toward for the sake of righteousness.

Christians are not to allow our circumstances to define our faith. Certainly our circumstances can impact our daily lives, challenge us, and create great difficulties, but they cannot define us. Christians too may call out to God during difficulty, seeking answers, help, and hope. This would be a lament that eventually edifies.

Apart from those in the medical field, ones serving on the front-lines of the pandemic, and those who have had loved ones die due to the coronavirus, most people are simply sitting at home hoping for "normal" to return. It is certainly human to desire to be able to do what one wants when one wants. These freedoms have provided us opportunities to live as we choose our entire lives (at least in the USA.)

Lamenting What We Have Lost

We lament because we are saddened. Based on what many social media posts are stating, we primarily lament over lost opportunities to celebrate special days, eat at favorite places, and be entertained as we choose, as well as others. 

It is certainly sad that high school and college graduations have been canceled.

It is sad that athletic competitions are not happening.

It is sad that restaurants are not open for dine-in.

It is sad that churches are holding online services only.

These and many other realities are truly sad. 

What I have discovered in my own heart has been the creeping feeling of boredom. I have heard others declare "We're so bored!" when asked how they are managing. Some are struggling to ensure their children are constantly busy and doing things. 

We (and I mean "we" including "me," not "we" meaning just "all you other people") are a people who idolize entertainment and activity. If busyness were a spiritual gift, we would excel in honoring God through our workaholism.

I suggest we go to his Word for some perspective. Some solace. 

Removing Idols So We May Rest

Perhaps God has removed our idols for a season and is moving us to live out the words of psalmist "Be still and know that I am God." (Psalm 46:10)

I am convinced that elevating our boredom may be indicative of idolatry in our hearts. 

Sermons and devotionals in the thousands have been shared declaring the need for believers in Christ to love him well by resting in him. We are commanded to find our sabbath in Christ. He modeled the solitary moments of prayer and devotion throughout his life. 

Maybe introverts are better wired for this, but I doubt it.

Introvert or extrovert, we all tend to drift toward the idols of our hearts. Therefore, in this season of very real danger, of very real change, of very real challenge...we need to truly lament.

Lamenting and Worshipping Well

The circumstances we face are difficult, but not unique.

Regarding church attendance and public worship gatherings, many brothers and sisters have historically struggled and served faithfully in nations and under regimes where meeting together as local churches was difficult, to say the least. Many have and do meet in secret. Many are unable to be part of a "mega-church" by law and thus, some of the greatest church planting movements are taking place in the areas of the world where house-churches are the only options and once there is a group of larger than twenty, a new church must be planted.

To be clear, the easy evangelicalism we have experienced in our nation for decades is not the norm. It is the exception. Most Christians throughout history would "amen" that loudly.

There are stories of those who survived and suffered under pandemic circumstances throughout history. These pandemic stories had been mostly forgotten except for those who study history. More stories are being shared regarding the challenges the world (and church) faced in the early 1900s during the Spanish flu pandemic. We are reading more accounts of those who survived and witnessed plagues of old. These stories are not encouraging, but revealing.

To be clear - we are facing great challenges, but this is nothing new and not unique to us. 

Our difficulties, by and large, are not difficult (notwithstanding those infected and the aforementioned front-line community servants.) 

For Christians, our faith is being tested.

Our faith is always being tested.

As the church responds and as pastors, seek to minister well, we must be careful not to be, or seem to be, primarily concerned with our loss of regularly-scheduled church services, our loss of financial support, or worse - as little more than whiny vocalizers of political echo-chamber gripes that is so prevalent in our culture.

While some believers are moving quickly to enact the very best food distribution and face mask sewing groups in the community (which are good,) or seeking to organize students or adults in the church to be "on mission" thus, creating busy work disguised as mission work (don't get me wrong, mission and relief work is vital,) we must not miss what it appears God is doing.

What God Is Doing

I have heard many seek to proclaim unequivocally what they know God is saying and doing. 

I'm not attempting that. Yet, as as pastor who is praying and seeking God's lead through these days, I do believe he desires that I, and perhaps others, pause. Stop. Rest. Sabbath in him.

I do know he is drawing me closer to him.

I believe he is pointing me back to the teachings of Christ in Matthew 6 regarding anxiety and worry.

But seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be added to you. “Therefore do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble.

Matthew 6:33-34 (ESV)

Lament we should, but not for the loss of our comforts, but for the realities of life.

Lament removes motivational self-aware, self-centered, New Age-infused mindset statements that have permeated all venues in our society and allows us "to be real and to trust." (Vroegop)

If we avoid the reality of hardships in life, we rob believers of the biblical value and strength offered through a season of lamentation. 

God has slowed us. He has shifted our well-made plans for ministry and church-life. Every church's cool "2020 Vision" theme for the year has been forgotten. He is causing us to reconsider things long avoided, if not forgotten.

As we lament these circumstances, we are drawn to God for strength, for direction, for hope. 

Stop and Start

So, stop searching for the "end times prophecies" declaring this as irrefutable proof of Christ's imminent return. Rather, repent that you forgot that the end times began in 33 AD and we continue to await his promised return, without the need for modern-day prophetic prognosticators. Seriously, if we need sensationalized films and online gurus giving us prophecy snippets in order to live like we are in the last days, we may have more spiritual sickness within us than we knew. 

Stop parking yourself in the recliner in front of your favorite 24-hour news channel that does more to promote panic, worry, anxiety, and anger through entertainment disguised as news and loud-talkers promoted as experts than is helpful.

Stop being drawn into social media posts and comment threads that denigrate your neighbors and others under the guise of "community watchdog."

Stop complaining there is nothing to watch on television after you just binged another season of something on Prime or Netflix.

Stop complaining about having to be home with your spouse and children. Recognize that these days together may be a gift you are ignoring. And, if there are major issues within the relationships, pray for insight and seek help (even online through Zoom call counseling.) However, if abuse is happening in the home, pandemic or not, find a way out of that house.

Start lamenting in honest prayer to God, trusting his heart. 

"God, where are you?" is an honest prayer. Ask him. Recognize that he has not abandoned his children. He is where is eternally has been.

Start reading the Word daily. Contemplate the truths revealed.

Repent as God's Spirit leads.

Trust him today...and for the days to come.

The God who was Lord over your days of leisure is Lord of your moments of lament.

And don't worry about tomorrow.

“Therefore do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble. Matthew 6:34 (ESV)


Preparing for the New "Normal" When Our Church Gathers Again (In Person)

You have likely heard it. You may even have said it during these days of the pandemic

"I can't wait until things get back to normal."

This is just my opinion, but I don't think whatever "normal" was for us prior to the coronavirus outbreak is the "normal" we will experience in the future. I am confident we will not just one day go back to gathering in large crowds at sporting events, shopping centers, grocery stores, or even church.

"Social Distancing" is now firmly set in our lexicon and will likely not go away.

Face masks will be worn by more people on a daily basis even after the concerns of a strong communicable virus are gone. 

We will see an increased usage of hand sanitizer.

Those stickers on the grocery floor telling patrons how far to stand from others will remain.

However, I do hope we see more toilet paper available on the store shelves again.

Lightstock_415662_medium_david_tarkington

"Normal" Always Changes

Many of us have seen norms change numerous times in our lives. 

For those old enough to remember the pre-September 11 world, we know that everything changed that day. Airports changed dramatically and instantly. Security increased. Full-body scanners were installed. Non-flying friends and family members were no longer allowed to sit in the terminal near the entrance to the planes. Things changed and the changes became normal.

That's just one example, and perhaps the most obvious.

Other things have changed over the years. Most are minuscule and end up becoming memes or social media posts where adults reminisce about how things used to be.

This time, the changes will be global. This time the changes impacts everyone equally. This includes the church.

Now Is the Time to Prepare for Our First Sunday Back

Like others, I am looking forward to our first Sunday back face-to-face as a church family, worshipping together as the assembly of believers. While I am very thankful for the technological advances we have that allow us to stay connected online, these online meetings and gatherings are not sufficient replacements for the in-person gathering of the saints.

There will be a Sunday when the church meets once more in person. When will it occur? What will that look like? 

No one knows when, but we can begin to think about what it will be like.

I shared these points with our church leadership and membership this week. These are just thoughts that I have been working through, based on conversations with other pastors and ministry leaders. I know I am not the only one considering these things, but hopefully by putting some of these on a list, we can (or at least I can) be best prepared to lead well during the days of the new "normal."

Here are some of my thoughts regarding our church's first Sunday back (these will likely change somewhat)...

On the first Sunday back...

  • We will observe of the Lord’s Supper (we have not encouraged our church to partake as an at-home event during this time.) We will provide the elements of the juice and bread in pre-sealed cups with the wafers in the lid (view here) to ensure that no one in the room is touching the bread other than the church member partaking. It also provides a cover over the juice, just in case someone sneezes in the room. We will likely have the cups in the cup holders already in the pews with just a few on a table up front for distribution by our deacons.
  • We will likely NOT have Life Groups (e.g. Sunday School, small groups.) initially due to the size of our rooms and the numbers who normally fill them. The spacing between people will be needed and planning well for preschool, children, and senior adults are vital. Therefore, online groups will remain for most initially. This means that we will likely have a family integrated worship experience.
  • Our first Sunday back at our primary campus (our church facility) likely will not coincide with the first Sunday back at our extended campuses in the community that meet at the YMCA and an elementary school due to rented/borrowed facility space availability. Those churches that meet in schools or rented property have less control on their scheduling, so legacy churches may be in a position to offer their facilities for neighbor plants needing temporary space.
  • What we’re seeing and hearing now leads me to believe when groups are able to gather again, not every group will be able to meet, at least not for unlimited participants. More likely, it will be limited to groups of 200 or less. For some churches this will not be an issue other than the spacing required in worship centers. For our church, this means we will need to restart with multiple services and physical gaps in the building between people so they are not within six feet of others in the room. Families may sit together (they’ve been living together during the pandemic, so this is fine.) We will use every other pew or row so that no one is directly behind another. There will be no shaking of hands or greetings with hugs (or holy kisses.) It will be weird, but will show our members and guests that we understand recommended guidelines and are prepared.
  • Our ushers will likely be wearing face masks and opening entrance doors for everyone so no members or guests touch door handles.
  • We will not be distributing paper bulletins or programs initially so that we are not handing anything from one person to another.
  • My desire is that we have a full worship team and band, but we may have to have the members standing all over the stage and front of the room to provide safe distance. 
  • I desire to have baptisms that first Sunday back. These symbolic statements through the ordinance of baptism celebrate new life in Christ and we want the baptismal pool filled and ready. My prayer is that many are having gospel conversations now with friends and family members and that as God draws people to himself, we will see a great day of celebrating new birth in Christ.
  • On the first Sunday back, I will preach a sermon from the inerrant, infallible, immutable Word of God (just as I always have) with the assembly together in the room, celebrating God's goodness and grace, reliant on his strength, and fully surrendered to his will. This is a day, with my brothers and sisters together in the same room, I long to experience once more. In the meantime, God is no less good, no less gracious, no less strong, and no less sovereign. In that I rest each day.

All this could change (except for the last bullet point,) but these are my thoughts at this point.

Moving forward, our children's check-in stations will have to be reworked to eliminate the crowding around the computers. The computer mouse and touch-screens we use for self-check-in will have to be cleaned continually. We will also likely provide face masks for all preschool workers and others as needed.

Most of these things we never considered prior. 

The new "normal" may be strange, uncomfortable, and some may say unnecessary, but I believe that the church of Jesus Christ - you know that one the gates of hell will not prevail against - must be focused NOW on honoring him daily in our lives and prepared well to honor him together in the days ahead. All the points above (again, other than the last one) are nothing more than practical guidelines during this season, set in place so that our love for neighbor is clear, as we love our Lord and worship well.

If you have some other things you're considering for your first day back, please leave a comment below. I would love to hear and perhaps learn from you in this as well.


Connecting With Offline & Non-Internet Connected Church Members During a Pandemic

Each week I join a Zoom meeting (like many, I have become accustomed to numerous online meetings and gatherings and have had more meetings using the app Zoom than ever before) with other pastors in our region. The purpose is to pray for one another, share concerns, and learn from each other new ways of ministering to and with our congregations during this time of social distancing and the inability of meeting together in large groups.

Most of us are finding this new way of coming together as a church to be challenging. I think each week a few pastors lament the lack of face-to-face gatherings while being thankful that we have more options now than ever for online streaming and internet-based meetings.

Vintage-communication-dialer-telephone

The lamentable growth of social media and all the negativity that comes with it (e.g. Twitter debates, Instagram envy, Facebook venting, etc.) has been moved aside as churches and ministries seek to redeem the online tools for the day. We have shifted everything we can to streaming and online groups. It is good, but not best and we long for the day when the church can come together face-to-face once again. We pray this is soon.

Not Everyone Is Online

As our church leadership has worked through our membership rolls, calling individuals to see if they have any needs and how they are doing personally, we have discovered a few things.

First, we discovered that many more church members have disabled their landlines in their homes and never informed the church. Therefore, we have incorrect information in our membership database for quite a few people.

Second, we found that we were talking to some church members who have not been to the church for years and actually either forgot they were members or have joined elsewhere and...never let us know. That's not their fault, but reveals how many times we as a church have let others "fall through the cracks." 

Third, we discovered that the least used app on our smartphones actually works. I'm referring to the "phone" app that on most phones is an icon of an old landline headset and when clicked actually dials a number so that another phone rings and an actual conversation can happen. I say this in jest, but in the day of text messaging and email, we (well...I) just don't make as many actual phone calls as I used to.

Fourth, we found that some in our church membership do not have smartphones, a computer in the house, or internet capability. In fact, some of these dear saints have no desire to have any of these things and will not be getting them.

Connecting with Offline Members

This last revelation is not actually surprising. In most of these cases, the individuals are senior adults. They did not grow up using personal computers. Many of them retired prior to their companies moving to be fully-computerized. In some cases, the computers they have used were not WYSIWYG icon-driven point-and-click devices connected to the internet, but old-school, C-prompt green text on black screen devices and dumb-head terminals. If those terms to not mean anything to you, don't worry. It may just mean you're young enough to have never used such. 

When social media took off many seniors eventually jumped on board at the insistence of their children and family members living in other states and regions. All the sudden the media platform designed only for college students (Facebook) became predominantly used by older adults. 

Still, not everyone jumped on board for various reasons.

The challenge for us today was in how to keep connected with these church members who cannot join a Zoom meeting online, watch a service on YouTube, or even comment on a Facebook post?

Since these online options are the primary ones we're using, we discovered that we must find a way in addition to regular phone calls, to keep these dear saints connected.

As all of us know personally, these dear saints were saddened they could not be with their friends and church family members weekly. They also shared that they missed hearing our Sunday services. While they were watching some very good pastors preach on television each week, they stated that it just was not the same and that the church they watched was not their church family.

I thought about mailing (snail mail) a copy of my sermon transcript weekly to these members. I may still do that as needed, but even then, I knew I would miss some. I needed another alternative.

Dial-A-Sermon

When I was a child I remember our little church getting a large phone bill one month. My mother was the church secretary, so that's how I heard about this. This increase baffled the pastor and office staff until it was discovered that the pastor's son had been using the church phone to call "Dial-a-Joke" numerous times. This phone line was a pay-per-call line and the young man didn't know it was going to charge the church. The bill racked up...and to be honest, the jokes weren't that funny.

I only remembered that story when I saw a church in the UK post that they had developed a "Dial-A-Sermon" option for their church members. At first, I thought "That's a waste." It sounded so old-school and dated and then I read more. It seems that this was a fix for the issue facing our church. By setting up this "Dial-A-Sermon" option, church members could call a number, hear a recorded voice state that they had reached the church's sermon line and then shortly, the audio from the previous Sunday's sermon would play. It's not ideal, but it works. A person can listen to a full sermon on their telephone (I would recommend a speaker phone for this.) 

This is much better than Dial-A-Joke!

For a very nominal fee (about $1 a month) this was done.

I went to the website linked and in about thirty minutes had signed up for the app (Twilio,) chosen a number in our area code (one actually assigned to my town) recorded a welcome note and linked the previous Sunday's audio file to the app. So far the number has been called at least twenty times. I know that because I have called it twenty times throughout the week just to see if it still works.

I called the senior ladies in our church who had told me they had no way to watch or hear our sermons and gave them the number. They were so happy. It was as if they had been reconnected at least in one small way to their church in this age of stay-at-home distancing. 

Since then, I have shared the information with numerous churches. I have seen a few begin their own "Dial-A-Sermon" option. 

Maybe it is something that can help you and your church as well. 

Rather than type up a step-by-step order of how to do this, I will just link the page where I found my instructions. It's on the Switched On Network site. Click here.

This is just one more way to connect with church members (By the way - personal phone calls remain the best.) If you have discovered others, please leave comments below. I would love to hear them.

If you're interested in hearing how it sounds, our Dial-A-Sermon number is 904-298-6417 (regular rates apply if you're calling long distance from a landline.)