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Posts from November 2020

What I Wish I Knew Earlier About Planting Churches & Sending Church Planters

Church planting is considered trendy by some.

Church planting is a term that has become used greatly in the past decade or so, but in truth is not new. In fact, it is how the gospel has spread throughout the world, from city to city, community to community, and family to family since the birth of the church in the book of Acts. Church planting is so much more than a trend. If it is a trend, it has been trending for two-thousand years.

I am thankful for the men I know who are now planting churches and supporting church plants throughout our nation and world. Intentional and strategic church planting in regions and areas where local expressions of church are needed continue to happen. Our goal as a church and mine as a pastor has been to help identify the men God has called to this amazing task, to equip them, enable them, and encourage them as they serve.

Church planting is not easy. It is exciting and it always looks great on video clips and promotional pieces, but the daily grind can be very difficult. Many of the planters and families we serve with have expressed those moments of isolation, feeling forgotten by their sending church, ignored by supporters, and wondering if they may have missed God's call.

That is why encouragement and continued support is needed.

Knowing Then What I Know Now

As a pastor of a legacy church (a nice term used to describe an old church) I have sought to help church planters, and call out men in our own church family to lead the way in this endeavor for the past decade or so. It has been a learning experience for me. The good news is that we have families serving on the field now, exactly where God desires them to be, in other cities, states, and even nations. They are truly on the front lines of gospel service as they have answered the call of God.

As I review our church's history of church planting and preparing church planters, it is clear that all who have surrendered to this call and continue to serve in this capacity were blessed by God greatly and serve well due to many factors, in spite of our help. In other words, we did not know what we did not know, but if we had it to do over again, we (as a church and leadership) would be more strategic and intentional for the sake of our planters. In many cases, as I review each, it is clear that we may have been so enamored with the concept of planting churches and campuses that we did not rightly pray for and prepare those God placed before us.

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Sadly, we helped some step into planter positions who should never have done so (at least not as soon as they did.) As a Send Network Trainer, I now go through many weeks of teaching and study with local church planters that provide information and expose blind spots early on. This type of training was mostly unavailable or ignored in our past. Therefore, our campuses and plants suffered unnecessarily. 

Scott Ball, writing for the Malphurs Group lists "Ten Deadly Church Planting Mistakes" in a blog post. It is a hard read because I recognize a number of mistakes I have made in the past with our planters. 

The ten mistakes are:

  1. Not going through assessment
  2. Planting without a coach
  3. Launching too quickly
  4. Leading without a team
  5. Launching too small
  6. Relying too heavily on outside funding
  7. Neglecting solid assimilation plans
  8. Installing local governance too quickly
  9. Waiting too long to implement a leadership pipeline
  10. Neglecting the process of strategic planning.

These are delineated in the blog post here. Some of these seem basic, and they are. Yet, in the excitement and joy of planting something new, often a few of these items are left to the wayside, only to be discovered to be needed and important later. Sadly, often too late.

Church Planting Goals

It is important to have vision and clarity when it comes to planting a church, but it also must be understood that there are times when our vision for a new work will help launch a church, but not sustain. In other words, the vision may seem set in stone, but after a year or so of engaging a community, attempting to grow disciples, and be the church needed in a community, that vision may change. 

Anson McMahon, lead pastor of Emmaus Church near Atlanta shared his thoughts on church planting and truths discovered in the journey here. One point that resonates with me is that as a pastor I must remember that Jesus knows what he's doing even when I often do not. 

To be flexible as a church planter and pastor is an understatement. It is required because change is the only constant (well, other than God) in the journey.

What Feels Like a Failure May Be a Win

We all want to win. Winning means accomplishing the task at hand well and doing so better than others. It's about crossing that finish line first. Yet, in church planting, what we often see as failure may actually be a victory.

It is not a failure to admit the plan is not working.

It is not a failure to shift focus.

It is not a failure to move to another area of ministry.

It may feel like failure, but it does not have to be.

Every church has a shelf-life. While the gates of hell will not prevail on Christ's church, the local body of believers gathered as church may change or shift over time. In fact, as is the case in our city, many will find their season of service coming to an end. This has been true in America for decades. We have seen it throughout Europe for centuries. The church of Jesus Christ prevails, but sometimes, the season of service of a local body in a specific place comes to a close. This should not be so that ministry ceases, but so the next chapter of gospel-centered ministry may flourish. 

As Baptists we are well-equipped in starting things like programs, events, ministries, or even church plants. We often do not recognize well when a season has ended. That is why some churches continue to have varied ministries attempting to function that were perfectly designed to reach and minister to a population who no longer exists. Thus the church lives under the banner of "We've always done this" wondering why there are no longer any positive results.

Sometimes a church plant (or a campus plant) served its purpose and has impacted a community well. A healthy church plant will shift from "plant" status to "church" status and engage as an autonomous family of believers. Yet, sometimes this does not happen. There are numerous reasons. Sometime blame must be placed at the foot of leaders. Sometimes this is due to outside impacts that leaders have no control over (you know, like a pandemic or increased facility rental costs.) 

Regardless, the church and leaders must seek to learn from each experience. It is too easy to allow bitterness, negativity, and feelings of failure to grow. 

I have seen churches and planters ignore or avoid church planting assessment. In such instances, problems have arisen in leadership that could have been addressed prior to the launching. When these issues arise months after the launch, the damage may be so severe the entire plant ceases.

This grieves me. Especially because it is avoidable.

Did You Plant a Church Or Just a Service?

This is something that I fear often creeps into our journeys of church planting. If the church plant is intended to reach an unchurched community by engaging one-on-one in the neighborhood, offering Bible studies, relationships, worship encounters, and the fullness of church to an area void of such, it means more must be done than just relocating a group of faithful servants to a new facility.

In other words, if the church plant is little more than a worship service, you have not planted a church. You have just relocated a gathering of believers to a new building. That can be a great start, but it is not a church.

Tim Keller says it best (full article here) ...

You might be passionate about expositional preaching and having really good preaching, and so you want to start a church. But, if all you want is your own pulpit, that is a horrible reason to plant a church. There are plenty of other pulpits out there that you can go to, but don't plant a church just so you can have your own. Or if you're passionate about good liturgy or good music, don't plant a church in order to have that.  Instead, find a church that you can plug into and be a part of that because church planting is so much more than just having the desire or the ability to plan and to prepare for what makes a really good worship service. You are not an event planner; you're a church planter, and these are two very different things. Now, planning a good worship service is of course going to be a part of church planting, but for those of you who have just started church planting or are thinking about it, you are gonna be surprised by how little of your time is actually devoted to that.

If I knew then what I know now...

Like many churches who jumped on the latest iteration of church planting in recent years, we have enjoyed the journey. We have seen lives transformed. We have heard the gospel proclaimed by those who were more silent in their personal witness prior to the new work. We have seen righteous risks taken. We have seen communities changed and great, godly things have happened. 

It has been good.

Yet, we also acknowledge that there were times we ran too quickly, even ahead of our prayers and God-given vision and strategy. As a friend used to tell me "Good is the enemy of best" and we settled for good (with moments of great) but should have been wise enough to wait for best. 

The Future Is Bright

We still plant churches.

We still send church planters.

We hope to do this even more in our church in the coming years. In fact, we are praying to be the sending or supporting church for forty church planters by 2040. Some megachurches can do that in about six months. For us, it will take longer. This means we must do more than drop a few dollars in the mail to a planter every now and then. It will require more than sending a mission team to another city on occasion. It will require strategic prayer and planning to send, support, and sustain church plants in our city and beyond for the long-term. 

We are learning from our past. We are thankful for the lessons. We long to be wiser as we move forward. 

We are reminded that God has a mission. His mission has a church. We are that church. To God be the glory.

And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. - Matthew 16:18 ESV


"It's 2020" Is No Excuse for Not Being Thankful

"It's 2020" has become the common response to anything and everything that has and is happening out of the ordinary and causing disruption in our pre-planned, surprise-free, "normal" lives. I get it. To state that this year has been challenging would be an understatement. While no year's schedule goes according to plan exactly, this year has been off the charts thanks to a mixture of words that begin with "p" – pandemic, politics, and protests.

It's 2020.

That's the response to "Why is this happening now?" or "This is not what I had planned," and even "Well...we're out of toilet paper again."

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It's 2020.

Even Christ-followers have fallen into a malaise (I've been wanting to use that word since the 1979 Jimmy Carter speech) that seems to have robbed many from the joy and abundant life that Christ proclaims we should be experiencing. Some have stated that this year seems like the longest in history. I understand that, too, but I checked. It's only one day longer than most years and that is simply because it is a leap year.

Church activities and events have changed. Online services have replaced in-person services for many (at least for a season) and prognosticators and survey takers are stating that many who attended church services in person with some form of regularity prior to March will never come back. That's a huge ball of discouragement for pastors and church leaders. 

But, it's 2020.

This year has produced challenges that have caught us off guard. Each person and family has had to pivot and shift to make things work best. That includes working from home, becoming homeschoolers, adjusting expectations, and seeking to understand what this new normal will be without being sucked into the latest conspiracy theories of global domination. 

Because it's 2020.

If I had a dollar for each person who told me things would get back to "normal" (meaning pre-March) after the election, I could fund Lottie Moon's Christmas Offering with record donations. Now we are a few weeks after the election and...in case you haven't noticed...nothing has changed. There are more guidelines in place for some. Some churches who just began in-person services are shifting back to online only. Fear is rising. People are still angry. And...now it's almost Thanksgiving and many are frustrated in our nation that guidelines and rules in certain areas are in place that will hinder their gatherings. 

Thankful? For what? It's 2020.

It is during times like this that Christians must seriously consider how to worship, how to be thankful, and how to trust God more. This is extremely difficult for western and American Christians who often elevate personal rights over submission to Christ.

Sometimes personal rights and freedoms (which I love, by the way) are used as weapons of the enemy to keep people from focusing on the main issues of life. Discernment is key for the Christ-follower. We must not stand on our independence to such a degree that we forget our total dependence on Christ. 

So, let's be thankful. Not because this year has been so much fun, but because nothing has occurred in 2020 (or any other year in the past or future) that God has not been Lord over. His sovereignty is not simply in place when things go according to our plans, for our ease, and for our immediate benefit. God is sovereign over all. He truly is Lord of lords and King of kings, and for this we must be thankful.

Paul gives Timothy and us a good reminder regarding contentedness and thankfulness.

But godliness with contentment is great gain, for we brought nothing into the world, and we cannot take anything out of the world. 1 Timothy 6:6-7 ESV

So give thanks with a grateful heart.

It's 2020 and God is not shaken.

He is sovereign over the calendar, over the pandemic, over the politics of the age, over the protests, and hopefully over you. 

Oh give thanks to the Lord, for he is good;  for his steadfast love endures forever! 1 Chronicles 16:34 ESV


What the Pastor Is Expected and Obligated To Do

In most churches pastors are hired (called) and given a job description which lists expectations the congregation holds. Perhaps this is an example of current-era business practices and human resource strategies being "baptized" and brought into the church. I am not saying that is bad, but the job description (hopefully one centered on the biblical responsibilities and qualifications) often does not delineate the unspoken expectations of the pastor.

Those expectations are normally discovered by acts of omission (or perhaps commission.) 

We are beyond using the excuse "They didn't teach me that in seminary" in that pastor/shepherds do very many things not taught in seminary. Things that no class syllabus could lay out have occurred in every pastor's experience. 

For example, it may seem like no big deal to rearrange the furniture in a Sunday School class or to move a podium from one room to another where it could be better used, but when the pastor finds out that the podium was built by long-deceased Brother Buford and was meant to remain in his old classroom...a "special called business meeting" may be on the horizon.

Every pastor who has served for any significant length of time in a local church (whether an established church or a new plant) will have stories where he inadvertently crossed a line or stepped on a social landmine unawares.

There are  expectations that churches and Christians as individuals have for pastors that are truly biblical and should never be questioned, abdicated, or ignored. 

Preach the word; be ready in season and out of season; reprove, rebuke, and exhort, with complete patience and teaching.  - 2 Timothy 4:2 ESV

Pay careful attention to yourselves and to all the flock, in which the Holy Spirit has made you overseers, to care for the church of God, which he obtained with his own blood.  - Acts 20:28 ESV

And he gave the apostles, the prophets, the evangelists, the shepherds and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ.  - Ephesians 4:11-12 ESV

So I exhort the elders among you, as a fellow elder and a witness of the sufferings of Christ, as well as a partaker in the glory that is going to be revealed: shepherd the flock of God that is among you, exercising oversight, not under compulsion, but willingly, as God would have you; not for shameful gain, but eagerly; not domineering over those in your charge, but being examples to the flock. And when the chief Shepherd appears, you will receive the unfading crown of glory.  - 1 Peter 5:1-4 ESV

There are others, but the point is that Scripture speaks to the obligations, responsibilities, morality, and expectations of the one called out by God to serve as pastor in his local church.

Then, there are other expectations that are placed upon the pastor by well-intentioned church members. Not all expectations are bad. In fact, most could not be categorized as being unbiblical. There are many expectations that are little more than cultural or historical and while not actually spoken of or against in Scripture, if these items usurp the priority of prayer, Bible study, and preaching the Word well (allowing time for study) then the church could actually be piling on responsibilities designed not by God, but by others, that will actually harm the ministry by keeping the pastor tired, perpetually dissatisfied, absent from his family, and unprepared for the primacy of the role.

Hospital Visitation

For example, while visiting the sick in hospitals or those in nursing homes is not mentioned as a pastoral responsibility in those terms in the Bible, it is often the right thing to do (pending COVID restrictions.) It is actually the right thing to do for all Christians and not just a pastoral responsibility.

Counseling

Offering counseling is another good thing. It is even a biblical thing, but not the primary thing pastors must do.

Community Events

Being visible in the community at local gatherings, club meetings, prayer breakfasts, golf tournaments, board meetings, etc. are not necessarily bad, but if done in order to elevate self (or to elevate one's pastor) or to create some form of small-pond celebrity status...then, well, it is bad and likely sinful. They can also overwhelm a pastor's schedule keeping him from the primary call, by creating a full calendar of events that have nothing to do with the church or the call. 

Funerals

Preaching at funerals is expected by church members, though not a mandate in scripture. In fact, this has become a very important part of my ministry. As I serve the Lord in a church with many aging members, funerals have become far more regular on my schedule than I desire. Yet, these moments of gathering with family and friends, remembering a recently passed loved one, celebrating God's grace and mercy, and proclaiming the truth of the gospel allows for these moments that always interrupt our schedules to become holy pauses where God is glorified and the truth is declared.

Weddings

Then, there are weddings. I have had the honor of officiating many weddings over the years. Each one has been unique and each has presented a new set of questions to answer.

While much talk in Christian circles is about the fallout related to the Obergefell decision of the US Supreme Court a few years back making same-sex unions legal, I won't address the intricacies of that here as I have written about it previously. However, in case it is not known, I do not agree with the Supreme Court decision and I hold to the biblical definition of marriage being only between one man (born a man) to one woman (born a woman) for life in a covenant relationship.

I have been part of many Christian weddings where God was honored clearly and the worship experience truly occurred. They have been memorable, joyous, holy occasions.

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Nevertheless, some "Christian" weddings have shifted from being a ceremony where God was worshipped, where the union of man and woman was clearly expressed as an illustration of Christ and his church, and the crowd walked away knowing they had experienced holy matrimony (with an emphasis on holy) to being little more than an event designed to be remembered for the dress of the wedding party, the  venue, decorations, theme, Instagram hashtag, and the post-ceremony antics.

Weddings are Big Business

It is clear from "Say Yes to the Dress" to the renovations of old barns and farms into destination wedding venues, and even the influence of so-called reality shows such as "The Bachelor" and every "I married someone I just met..." show on TLC, that weddings have become big business. The show becomes more important than the vows for some and amazingly many are left scratching their heads when the shine has worn off and they realize they put far more energy and money into the wedding than the marriage.

It is painful to watch.

It is more painful as a pastor to know that at some level I may have allowed this to occur by ignoring the guidelines for marriage and steps needed to help a bride and groom wisely prepare and plan for their wedding and ultimately marriage.

Church members have expectations and they just presume that the pastor will officiate their child or grandchild's wedding, or maybe even their own wedding simply because he is the pastor and that is what he is supposed to do.

Over the years, I have made numerous mistakes when it comes to weddings. I have stood as the pastor, God's ambassador, calling a man and woman into holy matrimony, without preparing them for what the ceremony means and what is to come. Sometimes, I have done so because I knew this was my expected role. Other times, it was because I knew the people getting married and called them friends. 

Often guidelines are written to help keep future mistakes from being made. Therefore, we have set up some guidelines that provide guardrails for our pastors and ministers on staff. In fact, it gives them permission to say "NO" to a couple when they have been asked to officiate such a ceremony in order to provide a larger "YES" to helping them walk into a godly, biblical marriage.

Pre-marital counseling is a must and we utilize the "Saving Your Marriage Before It Starts" material by Drs. Les and Leslie Parrott. There are many other quality pre-marital counseling resources available and each pastor must deem what works best for him and the couple. The key is to ensure it is not rushed and serious evaluation and discussion occurs, always going back to God's role for husband and wife and his blessing upon the union. 

When do we say NO to weddings?

Well, this list is not in order of importance or all encompassing, but does provide some basics for our church's pastors when it comes to weddings. There could be lists for every segment above, but the wedding issue continues to be one that must be addressed, so here is a sampling of when we say "no":

  • When either bride or groom is a believer seeking to marry a non-believer. 
  • When the bride or groom have never attended the church, or any church.
  • When the bride or groom used to attend but haven't been active in years and just want the pastor or venue for the ceremony because "that's expected."
  • When neither the bride or groom is a believer. There really is no need to have a Christian wedding for non-Christians, though the opportunity to share the gospel must not be ignored.
  • When another pastor at the church the couple actually attends refused to officiate their wedding due to some biblical offense and the couple is only seeking some other pastor to fill the spot.
  • When the couple refuses to participate in multi-session pre-marital counseling.
  • When elements of the service actually make a mockery of God and his design (for instance, I refused a ceremony where the bride was going to wear a tuxedo and the groom was going to wear a dress because they thought it was "funny.")
  • When a couple is living together out of wedlock. There may be cases where the individuals are unbelievers who both recently surrendered their lives to Christ and allowances (temporary separation, quick counsel and private ceremony, etc.) are made. In these cases, the God-honoring aspects are clear. Yet, there are also cases where long-time church members/attenders just ignore these guidelines, move in together (the line is often "for financial reasons") and basically expect the pastor/minister to ignore the facts before him. 
  • When adultery has clearly occurred and repentance is absent.
  • When either the bride or groom is already married. Just wanted to clarify that for the fans of "Sister Wives."
  • For me...when I am not available. The truth is, I am most often available and while I may shift things at the last minute to speak at a funeral for a dear saint, I will not shift to accommodate a ceremony that just happens to be in the middle of a much needed vacation or other trip.

Grace Abounds

It should be noted that while we have these items that lead us to say "NO" that it is not a joy to say no to a couple. The hope is that this man and woman in love would be open to honest, heart-felt, biblical conversations with one of our pastors about the gospel, God's design for marriage, and how to honor him. Grace abounds and this must not be ignored. The wedding planning may just be a gospel conversation moment and should not be brushed off. The end result is that at times, "no" is still the answer from the pastor, but it is not to be offered as a legalistic response (there's no joy in being mean) but as a plea for holiness and trusting God.

Be Steadfast, Pastor

Pastor, there are always expectations placed upon you that seem to lie outside the job description. When you say "no" to a church member who has clear expectations for your presence, performance, or approval, you had best have a bigger "yes" ready. We don't say "no" just for the fun of it. The "no" is meant to drive people to a deeper, biblical "yes" and that is part of shepherding well. 

The wise shepherd will lead his sheep, but may have to yell "no" at them at times in order to protect them and guide them to safety and abundance.

Everyone has expectations of everyone else. Look to the Word first and hold fast to your calling. For the church member, do the same and pray for your pastor as he seeks to lead wisely and well. And...give him a break if he says no to officiating your kids' wedding or can't visit your neighbor's aunt in the hospital every week.


Christians, the Presidential Election, and Political Idolatry (Or...What Now That This Election Is Over?)

There are phrases that we say because we know we are supposed to say them.

These words give an appearance of understanding, right thinking, and maturity.

For instance, in an election year such as we have experience, phrases from Christians such as “God is in control” and “God is sovereign” have been stated, tweeted, shared, and expressed loudly. Additionally, there has been much said regarding the need for unity among Christians (especially Christians who actually attend the same church or are part of the same denomination.) While I hold that words matter, sometimes, they are sadly, apparently, just…words. Empty words.

This is proving to be true now in that many of the very same evangelicals who declared for weeks with confidence that God is King of kings, Lord of lords, remains on his throne, is never taken by surprise, and is in total control of this universe he created has somehow been defrauded, sidetracked, left behind, or mistaken.

Words Matter...Sometimes

In other words, “God is sovereign, except in this area of politics…apparently.”

Or maybe, “God is in control…except when things don’t happen the way I want.”

The Longest Tuesday

Last week was Tuesday. I mean it seems that the entire week was Tuesday. Election Day in the United States was supposed to be, as has been the case for years, the first Tuesday of November. Yet, and we all knew this would happen, the votes did not come in for all in a timely manner. There were varied allowances in certain states regarding mail-in ballots that has created a predicted conundrum (and for some a “conspiracy” comparable to what some consider LBJ’s 1948 fraudulent Senate run and the Chicago 1960 voting debacle.) Yet, on Saturday the Associated Press (as they have done since the 1840s) called the race for president for Joe Biden. As President-Elect, Biden has held speeches, press conferences, and put out statements regarding an agenda his administration will do.

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All the while President Trump and his spokespersons are refusing to concede, awaiting for answers regarding some filed lawsuits and questions hovering over vote counts and electoral college numbers.

So, what is the Christian to do?

What can we do?

Perhaps we could check back to some of the statements believers like us were making earlier in the year. Maybe revisit things like “God is in control” and “God is sovereign.”

Maybe.

That would be a good start.

In fact, it would be a great place to remain.

The marriage of evangelicalism and partisan politics has resulted in a strange mutation that actually elevates self while ignoring biblical Christianity. Whether red, blue, or somewhere in between, this is nothing more than idolatry. On one side biblically sound Christians have buddied up to prosperity hucksters and have harmed the church’s witness. On the other, some have willingly partnered with the culture of death and the moral revolutionaries to the elimination of a sound biblical witness. Sadly, churches found their membership divided, some choosing to walk away from their faith family over the rift. I fear we may suffer repercussions to our Christian witness for years.

Yet, knowing that words matter, I desire to lean into the aforementioned phrase that “God is in control” knowing that he was not surprised by the result of the election (or the coming result if anything is to change.) The mission of the church has not changed at all. The Great Commission was not revised. The Great Commandment was not amended. The gospel of grace has not been updated. God is the same yesterday, today, and forever.

As for the idolators in our midst, rather than throw the stones at the easily identified ones who have sacrificed their witness on the altar of political power, I will look in the mirror. I realize that “there, but for the grace of God go I.” For this I confess. In fact, we all should. Whenever we place our trust in anything or anyone other than Christ, regardless how “Christian” it may be wrapped, it is still a form of idolatry.

Thank God he is sovereign, in control, gracious, and holy.

Thank God.


The Results Have Been Tallied. We Have Our Answer!

It's true. After a long night of watching prognosticators, spinmeisters, analysts, and pundits explain maps, coloring within the lines either red or blue, flip-flops on what things mean, frustrations, celebrations, and all that comes with this season...WE HAVE THE ANSWER!

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Photo credit: Joe Shlabotnik on VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NC-SA


I know it's been a long year. People have been talking (behind face masks) about how everyone else should respond. Families have had arguments. Churches have even had divisions over this. Funds have been given to those who agree with the giver. Funds have been withheld from those who who disagree. Specialty advertising companies have raked in much, plastering names and logos on signs, stickers, banners, and any other items that can be branded.

People have stood in long lines. 

The postal service has worked overtime.

Civic duties have been fulfilled.

And now...thank God...WE HAVE THE ANSWER!

Today, this Wednesday after election day in our nation, it is clear. In fact, it is as clear today as it was yesterday and the days before. Amazingly, the answer has nothing to do with our nation.

The answer we have, the one many have been waiting to hear, is clear. And, we should be declaring it loudly today, with joy, with smiles on our faces, as victors.

Jesus Christ is still Lord.

He is still the Way.

He is still the Truth.

He is still the Life.

He is the answer. 

In this reality, his church, his children may rest. There are no doubts in God's sovereignty. Christians boldly may walk in him, trusting that the throne is not vacant, believing that the promises of the gospel are not watered-down. We have hope. We have lenses in our glasses that are so much better than those handed out by the political parties in our nation. Our worldview is not red, is not blue, is not green, or any other partisan color scheme. Our worldview is biblical and through the lens of Scripture we may see as God sees.

Love God well. Love people truly. Love people enough to introduce them to God.

Rest easy church.

We have the answer.