Conspiracy Theories, Fake News, and the Absence of Discernment Among Some Christians

Every pastor is dealing with this today. 

With all that we are facing in our communities and churches related to the pandemic, the polarization of political pundits, and the delay and/or cancellation of everything from sports to school, we are seeing more and more of this.

These are CONSPIRACY THEORIES.

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Photo credit: Free for Commercial Use on VisualHunt / CC BY-SA

To be honest, I have always been intrigued with conspiracy theories. Whether they be connected to the Kennedy assassination, the moon landing, Roswell, Area 51, 9/11, or any other number of pop-culture stories, these have always piqued my curiosity. Now, don't read what I'm not writing here. I am not saying I believe them. I am just saying that they have always intrigued me. 

Sometimes, I accidentally think that others are as up on the latest conspiracies and are as intrigued as I am. For instance in our church's recent leadership team meeting, I alluded to those who buy all these latest theories and refer to them as those who constantly believe the black helicopters are hovering above.

One of our team members finally stopped me mid-sentence and asked "David, you keep referring to these helicopters. What does that even mean?"

Oh.

You mean not everyone is familiar with the interconnections between Catcher in the Rye, the Illuminati, Bigfoot, mattress stores, and the silent, black helicopters used by the government to surveil citizens?

I know about the black helicopters because...well, because they were in a movie called "Conspiracy Theory." That means they are real, right?

These theories have always drawn attention from some. They raise questions. In most cases, it is clear that these are nothing more than elaborate theories and not factual (however, you may have difficulty convincing Pastor Robby Gallaty about the lone gunman theory in the JFK assassination.) 

Conspiracies Abound Online

I listened to Ed Stetzer's Leadership podcast today regarding conspiracy theories and the growth of them during this pandemic. He and his guests spoke of the vast number of stories that are shared online by Christians and the challenge facing pastors and Christian leaders seeking to lead their churches in truth and with discernment. I encourage you to listen to the podcast and read the articles he has written (linked below.)

StetzerCheck Out Ed Stetzer's Podcast & Stories Here:

The podcast (Episode 33) is available here.

Ed has an excellent article on this at his "Christianity Today" site here.

Here's another from a previous issue of "Christianity Today" by Stetzer here.

The Lies Just Keep On Coming

Every pastor and leader in the local church has received emails and messages from well-meaning church members and Christian friends. Over the years, I have seen these messages come in waves. They are shared on Facebook and other social media pages. I get a message or email stating something like "Pastor, this is serious. You need to say something about this..."

In most cases, what I say is "That's a hoax. I saw this message five years ago. It's not true."

To be honest, I have been guilty in the past of sharing such things in the past. One friend convinced me that NutraSweet turned to wood in the bloodstream and I shared that story. Once. Wow. Yet, age and discernment help me now to determine the veracity of such things.

For instance...

  • The "gay Jesus film" called "Corpus Christi" has been rumored to be made since 1984. I still receive this email warning Christians about this. While I am certain numerous plays and films have been or will be made that paint Jesus in such a light, this particular email with the attached petition is not true.
  • Pizzagate has been determined to be false from numerous media outlets, but some still declare it it must be true, primarily because the characters allegedly involved are those who are disliked greatly by the ones sharing the stories.
  • There is no one putting HIV-infected syringes on gas pumps intending to infect innocent motorists. 
  • Wayfair is not trafficking children in overpriced containers.
  • Jeffrey Epstein did not commit suicide (Okay, I believe this one.)

These stories and more are shared ALL THE TIME!

Now, in the age of COVID-19, we have even more stories. I get updates related to Bill Gates, Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, the 5G conspiracy, and the propagation of a virus as little more than an excuse to monitor everyone via new technology. Most Christians also add the imbedded chip stories connected to the number of the beast from Scripture. I hear how face masks are not helpful for anything other than in helping AI determine facial recognition better. The six-foot separation was nothing more than an organized strategy devised to allow AI to pick out individuals better. And...I hear the black helicopters now.

The Biggest Problem with Christians and Conspiracies

You know, one of these days we may discover that some of these conspiracy theories are true.

Maybe.  

That's not the point.

What is the point is what I heard Stetzer state on his podcast. The very Christian who shares every single unproven and outrageous story online (or the angry online rants of discredited pastors who garner likes by their pseudo-patriotism disguised as Christianity) then, perhaps on Easter or at Christmas, shares a story about the miraculous resurrection or incarnation of Jesus Christ is viewed not as a propagator of truth, but simply as one sharing another FAKE NEWS story. Well-intentioned believers will not be heard (or read and believed) not due to their insincerity, but due to their inability to discern truth from lies. Why believe the miracle about Christ if the story is coming from someone who claims to have seen Elvis at the Firehouse Subs on Tuesday?

Words matter...and so do shares and "likes" online. Think before you type. Pray before you share. Check your sources. Where did the story originate? Who wrote it? How old is it? Seriously...Madalyn Murray O'Hair has been dead since 1995 so she is not at work to get your favorite Christian radio station off the radio.

If all you share are the trending conspiracies and politically-themed stories of the day...when you do share something of eternal value, your friends and followers will just categorize it as another fake news story to relegate to the online trash heap.

Bearing false witness is not just something done with the lips. It can just as easily be done through a keyboard or by hitting the "share" button.

Therefore, having put away falsehood, let each one of you speak the truth with his neighbor, for we are members one of another. - Ephesians 4:25 (ESV)


A Shocking Statement About Christian Republicans and Christian Democrats...That Should Not Be

It's a statement that seems so obvious, but comes across as shocking to some. 

I have heard other pastors state it. I read it on a tweet by Derwin Gray a few weeks back. Then, for some reason, as I was completing yesterday's sermon at First Baptist Church of Orange Park at our 10:45am service, I said it. I said this...

 

I have had a number of friends ask what the response was from my sermon. They weren't asking how many worshiped or came to Christ, but were wondering if I hit a nerve and received a slew of angry emails or texts.

There is much to discuss among believers who hold differing political views, especially when it comes to issues that seem clearly biblical. Yet, the point is that brothers and sisters in Christ who vote differently, have more in common with each other than with those who happen to vote the "correct" way (i.e. "the way I vote") yet are unbelievers.

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Of course, the issues that divide political parties are not unimportant. There are valuable debates to be had and votes to be made. Nevertheless, sometimes, we see little more than party affiliation and miss the value of the image-bearer.

This is a solid reminder in an election year where polarization reigns supreme. 

To be clear, this is not a call to abandon biblical convictions or to ignore civic responsibility. I am not calling for the minimization of important issues and values. I just believe we should remember that the image-bearers of God who know God as Father and have surrendered to Jesus as Savior, have a new name...and it's not Republican or Democrat (or Libertarian, Green Party, etc.)

We serve a risen Savior. Jesus Christ is his name. We, as Christians, are first and foremost citizens of this greater Kingdom of God. 

Perspective.

Oh, and so far I have received no angry emails or messages. They may have been intercepted and deleted. Maybe...hopefully...we see this as the truth and are seeking to love God fully, love our neighbors (even our Christian neighbors who just don't seem to vote the way we like) as ourselves, and live fully as Kingdom citizens.


What If the Face Mask Helped You Reach Your Community for Christ?

For years I have heard stories of church splits. Sometimes these are needed divisions in that they are over doctrine. When unbiblical actions occur or false doctrine is espoused from leaders, division seems inevitable. We have seen this recently in evangelical churches related to the definition of marriage and other such things. In fact, my own denomination was launched over a disagreement regarding slave-holders being sent as missionaries. In our case, we were wrong, sinfully wrong on our stance. Thanks be to God for forgiveness and redemption. And, yes, we are still working toward unity and reconciliation as a denomination.

When it comes to local churches splitting, the stories are just as sinful and sad.

Most often the church splits we have heard about or have experienced personally have little to do with doctrine. In fact, a church can divide over just about anything.

There are stories of churches dividing over the color of the carpet, a change in the schedule, the use of hymnbooks versus projecting the songs, and any other number of things. I heard of one that split over the color of shingles put on the roof of the building, even after the fight led to one side having one color shingles and the other having another. 

People will Fight Over Anything

Humanity has always been divided. History is replete with stories of rebellions, divisions, wars, and battles. There are winners, losers, and those who are categorized as collateral damage. In many cases, the battles were needful and right. Even in Scripture we see battles between God's people and the enemies of God. Unrighteousness and sinfulness leads to disunity and individualism. It has always been the case. It always will be this side of eternity.

There are many battles occurring in our nation today. Being an election year, each division is accentuated and more intense than ever. It seems that we check our news feed daily to determine that which we should be angry about now.

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Most recently, face masks have become the issue. I was talking to one of our missionaries in Europe recently and he asked if the issues over masks was truly happening. He found it amazing that people would actually get upset over being asked (or required in some cases) to wear a face mask. I told him it is an issue and seemingly growing.

I fear that generations to come will look back and wonder how churches could be so foolish as to fight over face masks, just as we do now regarding those splits over carpet color. Ridiculous.

Maybe it is the nature of our personal desire for independence and our elevation of individual rights that makes this such an issue?

Maybe it is because people just, by nature, do not like being told what to do?

Maybe it is because people are watching way too much 24-hour news on television or on their streaming apps?

Maybe it is due to the fact that everyone is overwhelmed, stressed, and angry and masks just seem to be the tipping point in this year of pandemic isolation, racial disunity, murder hornets, bubonic plague infested squirrels, cancelled sports, and social distancing?

Maybe. 

Maybe it is something else.

People are sinful. It's the heart of man that is distanced from God and desires to live for self rather than others.

What about when Christians are asked to wear a face mask? What about when those of us who are free in Christ, redeemed, called, saved, and sent, are asked by...you know, the governor, or the corporation, or the superintendent, or the mayor, or...even their pastor, to wear a mask?

One gentleman (I don't know who he is because I was home last Sunday awaiting my COVID-19 test results, but if he reads this, he may send me an email or let me know how much he doesn't appreciate me writing this) told one of our associate pastors last Sunday when asked to put on a mask, "I have Jesus. I don't need a mask!"

Hmmm. I wonder if he put on his seat belt in his car when he drove home?

I am truly thankful this brother has faith. I just do not believe his choice to not not wear a mask from his seat to the exit is evidence of faith. It may be evidence of self-confidence, but that is not faith...at least not faith in God.

Our church began requiring face masks in our services a few weeks back. We are in Florida, so though we are meeting, we are taking extra precautions with distanced seating, face masks, social distancing, sanitizer, etc. The vast majority of people messaged me and told me personally "Thank you!" Some struggled with the requirement and do not like it. They have let me know, too. Let me say clearly that if anyone likes wearing a face mask, they are super weird. No one likes wearing face masks. We don't wear face masks because we like it. We wear them because even if there is just a slight chance they help, it is worth it.

It is not persecution by the government to have to wear face masks. Persecution will likely come one day, but it will not be spearheaded by mask-wearing. When persecution comes, you will know it. Just ask my friends in China.

Missional Masks

Here's my thought about why we should wear face masks during this time. If I were serving as a missionary in a foreign land I would go through language and cultural training. I would learn as much about these image-bearers who live differently than I do. I would adjust in ways that do not compromise my faith in order to engage them in conversation, show that I care, and ultimately share the love of Christ in words and deeds. Why? Because that is what missionaries do. That is what all Christians should do. We have a mission to fulfill the Great Commission and the Great Commandment.

In our nation today, there are the "wear masks" people and the "not wearing masks" people. In my estimation, there are more wearing masks now because they either are afraid or they are trying to be compliant with the requirements of stores and local officials. 

I want to reach these people for Christ.

I want to reach the anti-maskers, too.

I am concerned that if I do not wear a mask I am creating a barrier (virtual, not physical...like a mask) between others and myself. If in my desire to uphold my right to not wear a mask I lose an opportunity to share the gospel, I have lost more than I can imagine. 

To love others more than self is the calling. To love the Lord most of all is the command. 

If me wearing a mask gives me an opportunity, even without saying a word, to express that I care for others...I will wear a mask.

I hope you will, too. 

And if we're not careful, while we, as Christians are over here debating face masks, the world keeps spinning and millions remain unengaged with the gospel. You cannot "go tell" if you're home arguing over the unimportant.

(Seriously - this is not the time to debate the intricacies of N95 versus homemade masks that look like they used to be T-shirts. If that's the argument now, the point is missed.)


Don't Waste This Pandemic - Lead with Clarity In the Midst of Uncertainty

Years ago John Piper, prior to having surgery for his cancer, wrote a short message titled "Don't Waste Your Cancer." This is available online with the following description:

On the eve of his own cancer surgery, John Piper writes about cancer as an opportunity to glorify God. With pastoral sensitivity, compassion, and strength, Piper gently but firmly acknowledges that we can indeed waste our cancer when we don’t see how it is God’s good plan for us and a hope-filled path for making much of Jesus. (available at desiringgod.org here.

It's a worthy read, especially for those struggling with cancer or other health issues. 

The principle espoused by Piper is transferable to other areas of life where uncertainty lies ahead.

Recently, Andy Stanley, pastor of North Point Church in Alpharetta, Georgia was interviewed by Ed Stetzer and Daniel Yang on the Stetzer Leadership Podcast (listen here) about his decision to not restart in-person worship services at North Point until January 2021 at the earliest. Stanley's reasonings were clear and articulated well and whether others agree with Stanley on areas of organization, leadership, doctrine, or church polity, his explanation regarding their decision as a church continues to be discussed by many in pastoral leadership throughout the nation.

Don't Waste This Pandemic

Much like Piper's "Don't waste your cancer" statement, this one has been resonating since I heard Andy say this, "A pandemic is a terrible thing to waste."

When Andy said that, it was in the context of the church seeking God's lead in ministering well and leading well while serving those who are the church during these difficult and uncertain times. In other words, it would be tragic for pastors and leaders to simply sit on their hands awaiting the return of "normal" so that programming, ministry events, and all our go-to traditions of church gatherings could restart. He wasn't being condescending, and he knows that pastors simply aren't sitting at home waiting, but his point was clear. There is much to be done now.

What if this is the new normal?

That's not a statement of gloom and doom. I am fully confident in God's sovereignty over circumstances and all that occurs. It's not a fear versus faith issue, but is a question of discipleship. At least that is my view.

I am no prophet, but even if we get a vaccine for COVID-19... and even if the majority of people take the vaccine... and even if it works, I believe we will continue to see people wearing masks in public. I believe parents will still be more cautious where they send or take their children than prior. I don't think it will be a never-ending shutdown, but the impact of all that we are facing this year will have long-term effects.

So, what about the church seeking to be faithful, serve well, make disciples, and live missionally?

There are varied responses from pastors and church members regarding this. Even if you ignore the asinine battles taking place between the pro-mask and the anti-mask Christians (BTW - our grandchildren will look back at our divide over masks and laugh the same way we look back at previous generations who split churches over the color of the carpet or the use of hymnbooks versus projecting lyrics on a screen) there are legitimate concerns from pastors seeking to shepherd well and lead biblically. Why? Because these are uncertain times.

Another "Stanleyism" that he presented helps.

"People want clarity. Clarity in the midst of uncertainty is the name of the game and this is a great time for church leaders to provide clarity."

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It seems that just about every other aspect of public life that impacts our community is, if not failing, struggling greatly, to provide clarity. School boards and superintendents are on the clock now as public schools are seeking to restart. Governors and state leaders have become memes and soundbite feeds as messages fluctuate from day to day. Even athletic associations, especially those which determine rules, start dates, etc. for public junior highs and high schools are now top news as they wrestle with whether or not to allow games in their state. In just about every case, the challenge teeters between public health and economic stability. I will not get into all that here, for there are many others who are offering their opinions on such.

What is needed from leaders is clarity. As one coach stated in an athletic association meeting "Someone please make a decision. Just tell us what we're doing!"

Our church is not suspending in-person worship services at this time. Hopefully, we will not have to do so. We began meeting again in-person a few weeks back, with social distancing regulations in place and required face masks for all in attendance. We continue to offer online streaming of our services as well. Our challenge now is to focus less on the Sunday preparation and more on the intentional, strategic, discipleship of all in our church, even those who cannot or will attend in person now, as well as evangelistic engagement in our community.

Our fall schedule is written in pencil (actually, it's on a white board, but you get the point–it's erasable.) We are surveying our church members with children, and based on what we see now and where we believe God is leading, we will definitely NOT be restarting children's and preschool groups soon. Our mid-week schedule is likely to be shelved until 2021. That could change. We're flexible. You have to be. Yet, we want to be able to offer clarity, direction, and updates that do not change weekly. That is not easy, but it is our goal.

Perhaps your church is not meeting in-person yet. That may very well be the best for your church and community. 

Maybe you are offering some in-person gatherings, or plan to begin to do so. For a perspective from a church doing so, listen to Stetzer and Yang's interview with the leaders of Calvary Chapel in California. While their plans are mega-church sized, the principles based on implementation are transferable to churches of all sizes.

If you are the pastor of your church, remember that your church is looking to you for direction and leadership. You won't get everything right during this pandemic. Don't worry, you weren't getting everything right prior to it either (none of us were.) I am praying for you and trusting God that in these days of uncertainty, knowing that he always offers clarity, we will be discerning and trusting. Lead well.


Systemic Racism Within the Church - Listen. Learn. Then, Do Something.

We are blessed in our church to have leaders on staff and godly lay-leaders of impeccable integrity. Our church in Orange Park, Florida (First Baptist Church - FBCOP, near Jacksonville) is a predominantly white, Anglo one. We have existed in this community for over ninety-nine years. In that time, there are undoubtedly chapters in our history that are well left in our rear-view mirror. Yet, for every challenge and soiled chapter, God's grace has proven sufficient. For his glory alone, his church in Orange Park remains. I pray that as we look to celebrate our one-hundred year anniversary next spring, we will trust God for the days ahead so that those who are yet to be part of our fellowship will follow God wholeheartedly, lead selflessly, and impact our community and world missionally. 

Every generation of believers in our church has been faced with challenges and difficulties. Some are negative and sinful issues developed outside the church walls that sadly crept within. Others were of our own making. The sinful nature of those in the building sometimes superseded the calling and ministry of God's church. I addressed one such scar and evil era in a post last year. You can read it here.

Racism Within the Church

Much has been said recently regarding racial issues in our nation. Sadly, some of my older pastor friends state that it feels like they're living through the late 1960s all over again. I lament that it seems we should be further along than we actually are.

When it comes to what is termed systemic racism, there are many "hot takes" on the subject. Many of these are shared on social media and sent via email or text to friends and acquaintances. Some would say that even speaking on the subject of social justice would categorize an individual as a Marxist, and therefore in the current "cancel culture" lead to an elimination of any dialogue. 

This is not only outside the church, but within evangelical (and especially Southern Baptist) corners.

Racial Diversity Within the Church

I celebrate the reality that our church is no longer homogenous when it comes to race. It hasn't been since years prior to my arrival in 1994, but this church existed for decades when segregation was the law, so I'm sure there are stories - sad, embarrassing, sinful stories. Nevertheless, the reality is that we are, in the words of a dear friend, still "very white." I'm not apologizing for that fact because those who call our church home have been called by God to join and are covenant members. However, I do recognize God's calling to be missional and strategic in actually reaching those who live in our neighborhood and community (not just those who lived here thirty years ago.) Over the past few decades our community has shifted demographically and while some churches such as ours would seek to relocate to a newer community (basically a version of church-based "white flight") I am actually seeking God's lead in reaching our neighbors of diverse ethnic backgrounds where we live while simultaneously starting new churches in numerous other areas at the same time.

This means our church demography will change. Our leadership makeup will change. To be a multi-ethnic church (or as I like to call it, a biblical church) we must recognize that simply left to our own comfort levels and historical methods, we will never be the church God has been and continues to call us to be.

Addressing Systemic Racism Within the Church

Now, for the part of the article that will either gain me more followers and friends or lead me to be blocked online by others...

I do not back down when it comes to calling out racism. I never have. Yet, in this case, I believe it best to hear from someone else–from a friend, a sister in Christ, and a Christian leader.

Selena and Patrick Hayle have been members of FBCOP since 1997. I began serving on pastoral staff as youth pastor in 1994, later as Lead Pastor in 2005.

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Patrick & Selena Hayle

Patrick currently serves as the Executive Director and CEO of Mercy Support Services, a non-profit focused on helping offer a hand up to the unemployed, homeless, and downtrodden in our community. Patrick also serves as our Pastor of Mercy Ministries here at the church.

Selena Hayle has served for years in various rescue missions and other ministries. She currently serves as the Southeast Regional Coordinator for the Citygate Network which exists to to provide the envisioning, education, training, resources, guidance, representation, and nexus for missions and kindred ministries that are striving to move people in destitute conditions or desperate situations from human suffering to human flourishing through the process of gospel-powered life transformation.

Recently, John Ashmen, President of Citygate, asked black members of the Citygate Network staff to respond to questions that white people often ask as it relates to racism and other issues.  Ashmen presented these questions and responses in an email to supporters and I received permission from Selena Hayle to share her portion.

QUESTION:

"What does systemic racism look like, and specifically, how are you affected by it during a normal day in 2020?"

ANSWER BY SELENA HAYLE:

One of the things that God has done is to use my husband and me to integrate white churches in the South. After we encountered many episodes of racism in New York, we moved to Atlanta in 1991 and continued to share our lives with blacks and whites there. In many cases, we were the only blacks at events we attended, the communities we lived in, and in the places we dined. Some of the racism we experienced looks the same today as it did decades ago: Christians in the churches would sit on the opposite side of where we sat. People would be very sweet and appear welcoming at church but would ignore us in the supermarket or in the post office the following week.

Systemic racism means that people will look at your résumé and see your experience and call you, excited to schedule an interview. But when you get there and they see your skin color, the job is suddenly no longer available, or the process is explained to be longer and more complex than you were originally led to believe.

As a black CEO, systemic racism means that some white people will pass you in the office and ask the first white person they see to direct them to the CEO—whom they expected to be white. Systemic racism also suggests that as a black CEO you should make less than your white peers simply because of the color of your skin.

Having survived 37 years in America as a born-again believer, I must say that things for me have changed. I don’t judge people’s racist behavior anymore, but I continue to have open discussions with both blacks and whites, even when I notice evidence or even hints of racism. I continue to share with my bi-racial grandchildren that not everyone sees their blended cultures as a positive thing. When I’m out with my white relatives and friends, we sometimes have a wakeup call that we’re not all equal in the eyes of our neighbors.

My black family and friends have to face the racist ordeals when they come to visit. But I’ve learned that the only way to love my neighbor as myself is to love God first! We need to be focused on who we are in Christ and making sure that the world sees who we are now, rather than who we used to be.

Listen. Learn. Then, Do Something.

I am thankful God has placed Patrick and Selena Hayle and their family in my life. I am blessed to be their friend and pastor. In Selena's concise response presented in this post, I am also educated in ways that I otherwise would not be. 

As the church (not just our local expression of church) moves through these days, we must be more than open to listen. In fact, there are times when things within the church must shut down so that vital issues may be addressed. With COVID-19, we have not had to plan a shut down. It has been planned for us (and I'm not speaking of the government doing this, but God doing this.) 

In the New Testament, there are two times when the church leaders said "Stop! We need to address this issue right now. Everything is on pause until this is addressed. We cannot just keep going and hope this works itself out." (Okay - that's my paraphrase, but you get the point.) The two times are in Acts 6 and Acts 15 and both cases are about ethnic tension. 

So...racial reconciliation and racial unity are not outliers, but part of what it means to be one as believers. 

Conversations among image-bearers on differing viewpoints of racial issues cannot be done if everyone conversing is of the same race and cultural background. Therefore, we must continue having conversations, but also must begin (or continue) breaking down whatever has been built that, even unintentionally, elevates one image-bearer over another or denigrates one under another simply due to skin color, heart language, or cultural heritage.

We are one in the bond of love and that love is the unconditional love found only in Christ. 


White Church/Black Church – Rich Church/Poor Church – Suburban Church/Urban Church – Our Church/Their Church..."Lord, Where Is YOUR Church?"

During the early part of the 2000s, it seems that more and more independently funded "Christian" films were being released in theaters and direct to DVD. Some of these films featured Hollywood stars (yet mostly actors who were not A-listers or who had made their name decades earlier) or unknown actors looking to break into the industry. Some featured actors from local churches and friends of the producers.

Many of the films were produced on shoestring budgets and were as much a labor of love of the creators as an attempt to make a profit.

I enjoy many of these films. It's refreshing to be able to watch a positive, faith-friendly film with family members. Of course, some films are better than others and some...well, at least they were trying to do well.

In 2006, I watched a film starring a popular artist in Christian music. To be honest, our church staff was planning to go on a weeklong retreat and I needed to find something to fill the Wednesday evening adult gathering at church since all staff would be gone. My regular lay-Bible teachers were already committed, so I went the easy way and found a new film to show at the church. I even purchased the license to ensure we we legal.

This film is titled "The Second Chance" and it stars Michael W. Smith (yes, that Michael W. Smith of "Friends are friends forever" fame.) The film was produced by Steve Taylor (yes, that Steve Taylor of "I Want to Be a Clone" fame.) If the names Michael W. Smith and Steve Taylor don't ring a bell for you, then you were not a youth pastor in the 1990s, or you didn't listen to every CCM artist of the day when the music genre was growing in popularity.

"The Second Chance" Went Where Other Christian Films Would Not

I wasn't sure what to expect, but let me say that this film was not exactly like the other "faith-based" movies of the era. In fact, I can't remember any other Christian film rated PG-13 that was marketed to churches (probably because one of the pastors says "damn.") I don't count the R-rated "The Passion of the Christ" in the same genre. 

The second chanceOn IMDb.com, the following synopsis of the film is given by user Tracey Zemitis:

Ethan Jenkins (Michael W. Smith) and Jake Sanders (introducing Jeff Obafemi Carr) are both passionate pastors who worship the same God from the same book--but that's where the similarity ends. White and well-to-do Ethan is comfortable in his music ministry at the media-savvy suburban mega-church, The Rock; Jake is a street smart African-American who ministers to the gang members, teen mothers, and drug addicts of the urban Second Chance. When they are suddenly thrown together in a tough neighborhood and forced to work side by side, Ethan discovers there is no boundary between the streets and the sanctuary. But can the faith these two men share overcome the prejudices that divide them to give themselves and a struggling urban church a second chance?

The film is now fourteen years old. Most people I know have never seen it. Those who have may not remember much about it. Yet, this morning, one of the most pivotal scenes of the film came back to my mind. I have a copy of the film and I looked up that scene. The writers (Steve Taylor, Henry O. Arnold, and Ben Pearson) took a risk of potentially upsetting the very audience who would purchase the DVDs and watch the film. I think it was a needed risk. If you have ever listened to Steve Taylor's songs or heard him interviewed, you know that he is not one to shy away from risky endeavors for the sake of the speaking plainly to the church. The message in the film is clear and sadly, I am not sure the evangelical churches in America are much further along from what is depicted here.

Here is the scene. Let me set this up. Michael W. Smith is the prodigal son of a suburban mega-church pastor who is trying to rehab his image. He's a Christian singer (not too much of a stretch for Smitty) who is instructed by the church elders to serve at the pastor's first church, and current sponsored mission in the 'hood (as it is described.) The pastor of the church located in the inner city is African-American and once a year is invited as a guest to the megachurch for the fund-raising day where money is pledged by church members to keep the inner-city church open. This scene takes place on that Sunday. Knowing this...the scene is self-explanatory.

According to JustWatch, the film is not streaming anywhere at this time, though it may be available on YouTube. 

The Lord's Church

As with most films like this there is a somewhat happy ending, though it is not sugar-coated and simple as many "Christian" films show. I am left with the questions regarding what we are facing in our city, community, and nation now. As evangelical Christians, we must seek to live and be the Lord's church, commissioned as he has called us, living as missionaries in our communities and neighboring ones. Throwing money at a mission (or a cause) is not the answer and is no substitute for living our faith. 

I have no easy 1-2-3 steps for the church, but I know that which is illustrated in this film is not fiction–though I wish it were. 

We must do better.


Juneteenth - A Holiday Many Americans Will Hear About for the First Time Today

I have a prediction.

With all that has been happening related to racial issues in our nation over the past month, especially, it will not be long before Juneteenth is a recognized national holiday.

Currently, the day is recognized in forty-nine states, but rarely is mentioned and most employees do not get the day off.

It was a few years ago that I began posting on our church social media pages about Juneteenth every June. For our predominantly white community and church membership, this holiday is one often not spoken of, and more often than not, not even known about.

6.19_H

It could be said that many of our children are not taught about the holiday because it occurs in the summer and not during the school year, but there are other holidays in the summer and most Americans are fully aware of them. Of course Independence Day should be known by all, but I imagine more Americans have heard of Flag Day than Juneteenth.

I first heard of Juneteenth when I was a high school student in Texas. Sadly, that means for the first sixteen years of my life, I had never known of it.

What Is Juneteenth?

It has been called "Freedom Day" and the "Black Fourth of July." This day, as explained on the website juneteenth.com commemorates the following:

Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States.  Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation - which had become official January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new Executive Order. However, with the surrender of General Lee in April of 1865, and the arrival of General Granger’s regiment, the forces were finally strong enough to influence and overcome the resistance.

It is hard to imagine that black men, women, and children remained slaves in south Texas for over two years following the Emancipation Proclamation. Yet, when you study our American history, this should not be surprising.

Initially, the celebrations of Juneteenth grew and became annual events. These celebrations had little or no impact among the non-black communities. In fact, there was hostility from some toward the former slaves and their children for even desiring to celebrate.

Over time, interest in the annual celebrations waned. The decline is described here:

Economic and cultural forces led to a decline in Juneteenth activities and participants beginning in the early 1900’s. Classroom and textbook education in lieu of traditional home and family-taught practices stifled the interest of the youth due to less emphasis and detail on the lives of former slaves.Classroom textbooks proclaimed Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863 as the date signaling the ending of slavery - and mentioned little or nothing of the impact of General Granger’s arrival on June 19th.

The Depression forced many people off the farms and into the cities to find work. In these urban environments, employers were less eager to grant leaves to celebrate this date. Thus, unless June 19th fell on a weekend or holiday, there were very few participants available. July 4th was already the established Independence holiday and a rise in patriotism steered more toward this celebration. (juneteenth.com)

During the rise of the Civil Rights Movements of the 1950s and 1960s, Juneteenth grew in popularity once more. In 1980, the day became an official Texas state holiday. Since then, many other states have designated the holiday.

June 19, 2020 is Juneteenth and I believe many will be celebrating. Perhaps more this year than in the past. Hopefully we will soon see Juneteenth as a national celebration of freedom, simultaneously reminding us of our sins of the past (repentance and lamentation are good and healthy,) and also of the move toward truly recognizing as a special day in July reminds us that "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.


"The Gathering Storm" by Albert Mohler - Book Review

Dr. Albert Mohler has become one of the best-known Christian leaders in the United States over recent years. As president of The Southern Baptist Seminary (SBTS) he has a particular platform in evangelicalism that offers him opportunities to speak and respond to the many issues impacting the world today from a viewpoint described by Mohler and others as a "biblical worldview." 

I, for one, have appreciated his input on numerous cultural issues, especially over the past decade and a half, as seismic shifts in cultural norms and the now-termed "moral revolution" has sought to change the landscape of our understanding of right and wrong.

In addition to serving as the president of SBTS, Dr. Mohler has a prolific speaking schedule, as he is sought by many to fill pulpits and speak at conferences and special events. He is the host of two podcasts–"The Briefing" and "Thinking in Public." He is also the author of numerous books and this article focuses on his latest published by Thomas Nelson Publishers titled The Gathering Storm: Secularism, Culture, and the Church.

Mohler book
Image from https://www.thomasnelson.com/p/the-gathering-storm/

Churchillian Title

One of Dr. Mohler's favorite figures of history (known to anyone who regularly listens to his podcasts or has visited his personal library) is Sir Winston Churchill. The British Prime Minister, known for his solid and tenacious leadership of the United Kingdom during World War II, wrote the first of his six-volume series on the Second World War covering the growing threat of Nazi Germany. Churchill used the title The Gathering Storm for this volume. Mohler credits Churchill's book title as the reason he chose his book's title.

As the threat of Nazism was growing in Europe, many in the UK and elsewhere minimized Hitler's potential impact and most saw Germany's revival as something that would remain within the German borders, not impacting the neighboring nations, much less the world. Churchill, on the other hand, was a voice crying out for others to take note of the growing threat. When it became clear that Hitler and his powerful Third Reich was bent on European (and eventual global) domination, Churchill seemed prophetic as one who had warned of the storm.

In the same way, Dr. Mohler speaks in this new work of the growing and present threat of secularism to the culture and to the church. This is not a cry heretofore unmade. Dr. Mohler, as well as others, have been speaking of these threats for decades. Not unlike many in the UK who heard but ignored Churchill's warnings, sadly it seems that many Christians have either willingly or unintentionally been ignoring the warnings of secularism to such a degree that now the storm is not simply something that may impact us, it is clear that landfall has occurred.

For those, like me, who live in Florida, hurricane preparedness is a way of life. Floridians have different seasons than other regions in the nation. We have spring, summer, football, and hurricane seasons. When hurricane season begins, we begin to watch our local meteorologists more intently as they share of new storms forming off the west coast of Africa. We know those storms often build up, begin spinning with more intensity, and at times, move from tropical depression to tropical storm to hurricane with eventual impact somewhere in the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico, or the southeastern coast of the US. The "cone of concern" is developed and we watch daily wondering if we will be impacted personally. Watching the daily hurricane updates is like watching a turtle run a race. It's slow and plodding and uncertain...until it isn't.

Hurricane Warnings

Living in a state where hurricanes are part of our annual schedules, there are often times where warnings are given, but ignored by many. It is akin to the ignoring the flight attendants in commercial flights as they give instructions regarding how to wear the seatbelt, put on oxygen masks, and emergency exit rules. Since most who have flown numerous times have never experienced an in-flight emergency, these repeated warnings go unheard. Yet, when something mid-flight does occur and the oxygen masks fall from the console, it is clear that many would be doing their best to remember what was said pre-flight as they slide into panic.

In our culture wars and shifting sands of morality and rightness, the storm is no longer on the way. It is here. For those who have listened to Dr. Mohler's daily podcast "The Briefing" and at times felt overwhelmed with the data and daily updates of issues that run counter to a biblical worldview, his new book is a welcome resource. Many of the illustrations and delineated accounts in the book have been covered at some point by Dr. Mohler in one of his briefings, but to have the book available giving a systematic unveiling of the history of secularism and the subtle (and overt) impacts of this philosophy in our lives is telling and helpful. In some cases, the shifts have seemed immediate (e.g. the 2015 Obergefell vs. Hodges Supreme Court case legalizing same-sex marriage) but in truth are simply the latest visible impacts of the storm gusts upon culture.

Responding to Landfall

When hurricanes make landfall, the impact varies depending on wind speed, the structural strength of the buildings nearby, the depth and health of the roots of trees, and the preparedness of residents. Once the storm has passed, disaster relief teams arrive (many wearing yellow hats representing Southern Baptists serving and helping in Christ's name,) damage assessment occurs, and next steps for recovery begin. 

Unlike a natural hurricane, the storm we now face seems to be only increasing in intensity with an ever-widening cone of concern with no end in sight. Yet, as Christians we are affirmed that as we stand firmly on the gospel of Christ, though a narrow foot-hold certainly, we will not only withstand the storm, but thrive in its midst and in the aftermath. So, be encouraged.

In Dr. Mohler's book, he focuses on nine specific issues impacted by the rising secularism. Sadly, this is not only a secular, godless worldview present outside the church, but also at times visible within. The chapter titles categorize these areas so the reader can more clearly see that which has occurred and is occurring. Chapters speaking of "The Gathering Storm in..."

  • Western Civilization
  • The Church
  • Human Life
  • Marriage
  • Family
  • Gender and Sexuality
  • Generational Divides
  • Engines of Culture
  • Religious Liberty

After reading The Gathering Storm, I cannot help but see indicators of the growing secularization and worldview shifts daily as new headlines appear on my newsfeed. In fact, yesterday, the US Supreme Court ruled in what I deem a disastrous ruling, that "that 'sex' does, in fact, include sexual orientation and gender identity, despite the fact that legislators repeatedly voted against including those categories in the legislation." (ERLC - "After the Bostock Supreme Court Case") Where would this lie in Dr. Mohler's analysis? It is clearly part of the storm related to gender and sexuality, but also impactful in the area of religious liberty, not to mention family and generational divides.

This is just one headline from today. 

One can simply peruse other current and recent stories to see how the moral revolution and the rise of secularism continues to impact all avenues of our culture on a daily basis.

What Now?

Dr. Mohler's concluding chapter hearkens once more to Churchill's warnings prior to World War II. While Churchill, along with the other Allied leaders, entered into the storm against Nazism, fascism, and imperial despotism with a united, military campaign that proved to be essential for victory, Dr. Mohler is not calling for a militaristic movement. He is, however, clearly reminding the church that what we face today is truly a battle. The church has been in this spiritual battle since the very beginning, but the storm of secularism is our most recent and current beachhead.

Dr. Mohler gives reasoned, practical, and timelessly biblical encouragement and insight into how Christians and the church must live in such times. The concluding chapter is titled "Into the Storm" and that certainly is our calling. 

I recommend The Gathering Storm highly and encourage readers to subscribe to "The Briefing" for continued daily updates of current trends and shifts in culture from a biblical worldview.

Insightful Quotes from The Gathering Storm

  • A central fact of the storm now gathering strength is moral liberalism, which cannot be explained without the dechristianization of society. (xv)
  • Secularizing societies move into conditions in which there is less and less theistic belief and authority until there is hardly even a memory that such a binding authority had ever existed. (5)
  • We do not need a political movement. We need a theological protest. (13)
  • A true church does not give a non-answer to a direct biblical question. (27)
  • What morally atrocious age we have slipped into where we sacrifice babies on the altar of "women's health, autonomy, and their right to the pursuit of happiness"? (47)
  • Secularism has paganized the culture. Pagans speak of holy things as if they were lowly while speaking of lowly things as if they were holy. (64-65)
  • The headlines will continue down this trend–we will see not only liberals versus conservatives but revolutionaries versus revolutionaries; feminist ideology versus transgender ideology; gay and lesbian activism against transgender activism. (97)
  • We should lament the brokenness and understand the many failings of the Christian church toward those who identify with the LGBTQ+ community. But we dare not add yet another failure to those failures. (115)
  • In response to the storm gathering over gender and sexuality, Christians must do at least two things: preach true gospel liberty in the face of erotic liberty and stand ready to receive the refugees of the sexual revolution. (119)
  • Teenagers have been listening carefully. They have been observing their parents in the larger culture with diligence and insight. They understand just how little their parents really believe and just how much many of their churches and Christian institutions have accommodated themselves to the dominant culture. (128)
  • Liberalism often fails to distinguish between conservatives and the extremists on the right. this can be driven by intention or by carelessness, but the result is the same. (153)
  • Consider the fact that religious liberty is now described as religious privilege. By definition, a privilege is not a right. (166)
  • Where you find failing churches and denominations, you find a loss of faith in God. (191)

 


Are You Pastoring the "Kobayashi Maru" Church of the No-Win Scenario?

The "Kobayashi Maru" likely does not ring a bell for most people, but for the few who grew up watching the original Star Trek television series and then enjoyed seeing Captain Kirk, Spock, Dr. McCoy and the rest of the crew of the starship Enterprise when they jumped to the big screen the reference is clear. The introduction of the Kobayashi Maru was in the film Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (the best Star Trek movie, by the way.) The Kobayashi Maru was the name of a fictional ship (even fictional in the fictional universe of Star Trek) that was created as a training exercise for Starfleet officers. The ship was in a battle with the evil Klingons and the trainee was to guide his/her ship to the rescue and win the day. Yet, in this exercise, the Kobayashi Maru was always destroyed, regardless what the trainee did. (For those who actually care, click here for a clip of the scene.)

The 1982 film opens with Saavik in the command chair, leading her crew made up of original series stars into the battle, only to see crew members die and the Maru destroyed. It was truly a dramatic scene when first viewed in the theaters back in the 1980s. Soon after the destruction and defeat, the scene shifts and the hero, Captain Kirk walks from behind a wall and makes it clear that Saavik, not unlike others, has failed the test. 

It's a short scene, but has become over time a reminder of what is known as the "no win scenario." It was repeated in J.J. Abrams rebooted Star Trek starring Chris Pine in 2009 as well as numerous books, reference works, and fan fiction.

(Okay, you figured it out by now, I am a Star Trek nerd. No apologies. Live long and prosper. Now read the rest.)

The No-Win Scenario

Sometimes in pastoral ministry, leading the people in the church God has called you to serve feels like a no-win scenario. That's a foreboding thought and not necessarily one that comes to mind when one surrenders to full-time ministry and is called to serve as pastor in the local church. Nevertheless, as I have discovered over the years and in talking with many other pastors, the thoughts of leading a church through cultural changes and missional engagement seems to be a no-win.

Church Members Divided

There have always been divisive issues among Christians within the church. Some are primary issues that must be addressed with no compromise. These would be issues of biblical fidelity, trinitarian teaching, doctrinal clarity, etc. There is really no debate on whether or not to stand firmly on such issues. To do otherwise is an affront to biblical Christianity and leaves the church open, if not embracing, false teachings and teachers.

There are, however, divisive issues that often rise up among church members that have nothing to do with first priority issues. They are not doctrinal. They are not biblical issues. Many have written about such divisions and articles on theological triage by Dr. Albert Mohler (here) and podcasts featuring Dr. Jason Allen and Dr. Gavin Ortlund (here) have addressed such clearly. 

Today's Trending Church Divides

There will always be issues that rise up causing division among church members. Most recently, that division centers around church responses to COVID-19 and how congregations are planning to meet in person again for worship. These are not insignificant issues, but as we all know, the opinions vary greatly on how one must respond and what must be done. Whether it is the use of chemical cleaners in the church facilities, the enforcing of social distancing, the forced locations for seating in worship, or guidelines regarding wearing/not wearing masks, the opinions are there - within every church, and they differ greatly depending on whom is speaking. 

I have received numerous emails and text messages from other pastors and have had a number of conversations with men in our community asking how we are addressing such. These are not isolated issues. Yet, as one pastor mentioned to me, "This is a no-win scenario." Thus...the Star Trek-Kobayashi Maru comparison. 

Captain David
Taken years ago when I had darker hair and a set for Star Trek existed in South Georgia

I was in a meeting earlier this month (not a Christian ministry or church related one) with friends from the community and one man dared to share his opinion related to being required to wear masks. I watched as another jumped into the conversation and the soon-escalating discussion revealed that no resolution would be found. Opinions are very strong. Fortunately, the moderator of the meeting kindly shut down the conversation and we moved forward (and these men remain friends, so no harm, hopefully.) This revealed once more that divisiveness is natural in a sinful world. The challenge facing pastors is shepherding through what some have called a no-win scenario.

Beyond COVID-19 and other pandemic related talking points, we now face the greater, and I believe the more serious divide relating to racial unity, police actions, government responsibilities, and all that has developed since George Floyd's death in Minneapolis.

If you thought opinions on issues within the church related to carpet color, music style, schedule changes, pandemic response, and all were big, you now know they pale in comparison to these even more potentially divisive chasms among those who not only are brothers and sisters in Christ, but covenant members of the same fellowship.

For the pastor wondering what to do...it seems like a no-win scenario.

Changing the Conditions by Clarifying the Calling

In Star Trek lore, the only Starfleet cadet to ever beat the no-win scenario of the Kobayashi Maru was James T. Kirk (of course.) When asked by Saavik how he did it, Kirk responded with "I reprogrammed the simulation so that it was possible to rescue the ship."

Immediately, his son David Marcus says "He cheated," to which Kirk replies "I changed the conditions of the test. Got a commendation for original thinking. I don't like to lose."

It's a gutsy move for the movie's hero, but in the church there is no "reprogramming" of the scenario. Some pastors desire to change the conditions and at times, they do. In some cases, these are incredibly positive shifts that lead to church health and biblically strong congregations. Sometimes, however, the conditions change simply because the pastor leaves. At times by his choice and God's calling. Sadly, at times due to the church's lack of desire to follow God's man's lead. 

However, all pastors realize in their ministry how easy it is to be distracted by secondary and tertiary items to such a degree that the primary ones are forsaken.

I know this is overly simplified and actually doesn't address specific things to be done regarding COVID-19 issues much less the issues of  racial unity among believers. I am not offering step-by-step fixes for such dynamic and serious issues. Please know I am not minimizing these either, but I do believe that pastors must first and foremost remember that the calling to lead a church is not the calling to be a CEO or Director of Activities. He is not placed by God to just tickle the ears of the congregation so that offerings will continue. The pastor is not called to be the political action committee chairman or a puppet for any group in a community or region.

The pastor is called first to God, then to his church where God has placed him to pray, study, serve, protect the flock, and proclaim the Word. 

There are many sub-points for each of these responsibilities. For example, protecting the flock is a biblical mandate and covers not only protection from false teaching (primary) but also from other issues (e.g. pandemic.) Proclaiming the truth of the Word and allowing the Scripture to speak clearly is primarily for the preaching of sermons but also speaks into cultural injustices of which there are many (e.g. life, racism, abuse, inequality, health, etc.) not from worldly devised talking points, but from biblically grounded truth.

My denomination's statement of faith, the Baptist Faith & Message (2000), delineates our beliefs regarding the Word of God...

The Holy Bible was written by men divinely inspired and is God's revelation of Himself to man. It is a perfect treasure of divine instruction. It has God for its author, salvation for its end, and truth, without any mixture of error, for its matter. Therefore, all Scripture is totally true and trustworthy. It reveals the principles by which God judges us, and therefore is, and will remain to the end of the world, the true center of Christian union, and the supreme standard by which all human conduct, creeds, and religious opinions should be tried. All Scripture is a testimony to Christ, who is Himself the focus of divine revelation.

An open, read, studied, and proclaimed Bible reveals, without error, God's truth and his answers to the issues of sin and suffering in our world. The Scriptures, inspired by the Holy Spirit, reveals the truth of the Gospel so that we may know the Father through the Son. 

Sometimes when it seems the issues we face as pastors fall under the category of the "no-win scenario" we must remember that the true win...the ultimate win...the primary win is found in Christ alone. 

I know for some that sounds like a trite answer to the very real issues and sinful hardships being experienced by many today. Please understand that despite all that we are suffering through, the One who is the "Suffering Servant," the Way, the Truth, the Life has been, and must always be THE point. 

To quote the great theologian James Tiberius Kirk (that's a joke) "I don't believe in the no-win scenario." 

With all that we face in our world today, I rest in knowing that our sovereign God is never taken by surprise and in him is the victory, the win. Press on pastors - just keep the main thing the main thing.


George Floyd, Justice, and a Longing for Change

Is this some horror-story version of the movie Groundhog Day?

We have heard this story, or similar ones, before. 

"A black man is killed by a police officer - film at eleven."

"Video footage of the killing of a black man taken by bystanders with smartphones."

"Surveillance video shows black man prior to killing."

"Protests erupt after the killing of black man."

"Celebrities and athletes tweet their feelings regarding the killing of black man."

We have been here before. And...like you, I am ready for this version of Groundhog Day to stop. If it doesn't, more violence and killing will occur.

George Floyd

This time the story centers around a Minneapolis police officer arresting a black man named George Floyd for allegedly passing a counterfeit twenty dollar bill in a convenience store. I won't attempt to describe the event in detail here because news agencies are doing analysis and showing video accounts on every platform they have available.

I did watch the video once, and not unlike the videos of similar stories in the past (sadly, in the recent past) one viewing is enough.

I personally have similar feelings as when I heard of Ahmaud Arbery's death in Brunswick, Georgia (link here.) Yet, in the case of George Floyd, the story shifts due to involving active-duty police officers.

I have had messages from police officer friends since this incident in Minnesota revealing their feelings. The ones I have talked with and the posts I have read show a deep anger. 

One officer told me - "Incidents like this takes away anything positive that officers do for the public. I can't imagine any situation where what they did would be acceptable." 

The story in Minneapolis continues. The officer in question has been relieved of duty. Protesters are calling for his arrest. The mayor is calling for his arrest. Those desiring to be on the news for a moment, whether celebrities or laypeople, are calling for his arrest.

He will likely be arrested.

But while all that is happening and the frenzy and calls for justice continue, let me share with you something from a pastor who used to serve in Houston, where George Floyd lived prior to being in Minnesota.

I did not know George Floyd. His background is being unearthed for news stories and you can read those accounts if you choose. His character is being either uplifted or degraded depending on the agenda of the ones posting or talking of him. Sadly, this too is part of the repeated stories whenever an tragedy like this occurs. It is wrong.

I also do not know this pastor personally, but we do have a few mutual friends. The pastor's name is Justin Bouldin. He now serves in North Carolina, but in 2015 he served in Houston. Justin posted this on his Facebook page (available here.)

Let me tell you about George...

My family and I moved to 3rd Ward (Houston, TX) back in August 2015. We moved there to serve as church planting residents at Resurrection Houston, a church that gathered and had their HQ right there in the Tre. The church also dedicated itself to serving a large housing complex called Cuney Homes. Cuney was nestled right in the heart of 3rd Ward, across the street from TSU.

When we arrived, the church was in the midst of planning a 3 on 3 basketball tournament at Cuney. It was a way to bring a day of positive energy, lots of fun, and just love our neighbors well.

The day of the tournament was your typical hot, sun-drenched August day in H-Town. But that didn’t matter because there were so many people out there on and around the courts that day.

George played on one of the teams that were entered in the tournament. (In fact, they ended up winning the whole thing.) During some games where they weren’t playing, I happened to get to sit beside and talk to George for a few minutes. He knew I was with RH and I introduced myself as the “new guy” (New Drew is how I said it to all the Cuney residents) who was serving with them and in Cuney Homes.

As we watched the games in front of us, George had these words and I will always remember them. He said:

“We need more of this in our community. See how everyone is out here, having fun and not worried about no nonsense. We need more positive opportunities for our people and that’s why I’m so glad Rez Houston is out here. Y’all always showin love and keeping it real for these youth. They need it more than anything.”

That was George. A guy who knew where he was from and never made excuses. He wanted a better life for himself, but also for his neighbors.

In fact, the picture on the left is the next day at our church service we had at Cuney. George and his team came to service and we recognized them as the champs from the previous day!

George floyd

But that wasn’t out of the ordinary. George would always help us put out and fold up chairs when we would have Church in the Bricks. My brother Ronnie Lillard (Reconcile) told how George helped him drag the baptismal out there so we could baptize people who had professed faith in Jesus.

Ronnie, Corey PaulNijalon DuBoi James DunnP.T. Ngwolo can tell you so many more stories of George and how he was one of the people of peace that helped open the door for Rez to become a part of the Cuney community and share the hope of Jesus with so many.

My heart is broken this morning after weeping last night. My heart hurts for our Cuney and 3rd Ward family for the tragic loss of yet another life. From what I have heard, the whole reason George was in Minnesota was because the seeds that had been planted and watered all those years were starting to take root. He was pursuing and taking steps of repentance and following Jesus.

But not only am I heartbroken, I am filled with anger. I want to say it is righteous and I pray to God He hears me, but I am tired of the character assassination and same M.O. every time something like this happens. This is so raw for me right now because I personally knew the man. I got brothers and sisters that literally spent so much time pouring into his life and watching the Lord work miracles. (The last picture was a recent message from George to Nijalon that he sent while he was in Minnesota.)

It hits different when you know the victim and have seen the real character. It sickens me that people who do not know him and have never encountered him want to freely throw out garbage takes about how he should’ve done this or probably did something to warrant what happened.

Justin writes more and you can read that on his page, but what he shares here goes hand-in-hand with a point I made last Sunday in my sermon. 

When we begin to see people as image-bearers of Christ, with friends, family members, siblings, etc., rather than just as unnamed, non-important characters in a news story then perhaps our culturally fueled insensitivity to violence and injustice will be piqued. 

I'm Praying for a New Day

Did George do something wrong that day? Did he break a law? Did he pass a counterfeit bill? I don't know. I do know based on what the videos show and after hearing from police officers who serve faithfully and honestly in their own communities that the actions and results in Minneapolis were unjust, wrong, evil, and ultimately deadly. 

Like you, I am seeing tweets and postings (not unlike this one) from numerous pastors and church leaders in our religious sub-group of evangelicalism. I know that Jesus Christ and a changed heart is the only thing that will cure this sin-saturated world. I know that. My fellow pastors of all shades of melanin know that. 

I also know that in order for this version of "Groundhog Day" to end, something has to change. I am praying for God's lead in what the next step will be. I am asking for wisdom for pastors and church leaders as we seek to respond righteously, and lead under God's direction toward a new day, not a day of temporal racial reconciliation, but of true unity in Christ.

I pray for a day when calling for justice does not get a Christian blasted for being anything other than true to God's Word.

I pray for a day when seeking to understand how brothers and sisters experience daily life in our communities does not come with accusations of abandoning the sufficiency of God and his Word.

I pray for a day when our children and grandchildren can sing the old song "Jesus loves the little children of the world...red and yellow, black and white, they are precious in his sight" and realize that Jesus does love all and that because he does, we must too.

I pray for a day when white people will stop saying "I don't see color" when referencing a person of darker melanin. I understand the sentiment is "I'm not racist" but the words actually say "I don't value your unique heritage and viewpoint."

I pray for a day when virtue signaling will end and true, God-fueled love for each other will reign.

I pray for a day when men like George Floyd will remain known only to his family, friend group, basketball playing buddies, and local church brothers and sisters and not to the entire world because of a tragedy that turns him into a hashtag.

I pray for this day.

And I know it is coming. 

He who testifies to these things says, “Surely I am coming soon.” Amen. Come, Lord Jesus! - Revelation 22:20 (ESV)