White Church/Black Church – Rich Church/Poor Church – Suburban Church/Urban Church – Our Church/Their Church..."Lord, Where Is YOUR Church?"

During the early part of the 2000s, it seems that more and more independently funded "Christian" films were being released in theaters and direct to DVD. Some of these films featured Hollywood stars (yet mostly actors who were not A-listers or who had made their name decades earlier) or unknown actors looking to break into the industry. Some featured actors from local churches and friends of the producers.

Many of the films were produced on shoestring budgets and were as much a labor of love of the creators as an attempt to make a profit.

I enjoy many of these films. It's refreshing to be able to watch a positive, faith-friendly film with family members. Of course, some films are better than others and some...well, at least they were trying to do well.

In 2006, I watched a film starring a popular artist in Christian music. To be honest, our church staff was planning to go on a weeklong retreat and I needed to find something to fill the Wednesday evening adult gathering at church since all staff would be gone. My regular lay-Bible teachers were already committed, so I went the easy way and found a new film to show at the church. I even purchased the license to ensure we we legal.

This film is titled "The Second Chance" and it stars Michael W. Smith (yes, that Michael W. Smith of "Friends are friends forever" fame.) The film was produced by Steve Taylor (yes, that Steve Taylor of "I Want to Be a Clone" fame.) If the names Michael W. Smith and Steve Taylor don't ring a bell for you, then you were not a youth pastor in the 1990s, or you didn't listen to every CCM artist of the day when the music genre was growing in popularity.

"The Second Chance" Went Where Other Christian Films Would Not

I wasn't sure what to expect, but let me say that this film was not exactly like the other "faith-based" movies of the era. In fact, I can't remember any other Christian film rated PG-13 that was marketed to churches (probably because one of the pastors says "damn.") I don't count the R-rated "The Passion of the Christ" in the same genre. 

The second chanceOn IMDb.com, the following synopsis of the film is given by user Tracey Zemitis:

Ethan Jenkins (Michael W. Smith) and Jake Sanders (introducing Jeff Obafemi Carr) are both passionate pastors who worship the same God from the same book--but that's where the similarity ends. White and well-to-do Ethan is comfortable in his music ministry at the media-savvy suburban mega-church, The Rock; Jake is a street smart African-American who ministers to the gang members, teen mothers, and drug addicts of the urban Second Chance. When they are suddenly thrown together in a tough neighborhood and forced to work side by side, Ethan discovers there is no boundary between the streets and the sanctuary. But can the faith these two men share overcome the prejudices that divide them to give themselves and a struggling urban church a second chance?

The film is now fourteen years old. Most people I know have never seen it. Those who have may not remember much about it. Yet, this morning, one of the most pivotal scenes of the film came back to my mind. I have a copy of the film and I looked up that scene. The writers (Steve Taylor, Henry O. Arnold, and Ben Pearson) took a risk of potentially upsetting the very audience who would purchase the DVDs and watch the film. I think it was a needed risk. If you have ever listened to Steve Taylor's songs or heard him interviewed, you know that he is not one to shy away from risky endeavors for the sake of the speaking plainly to the church. The message in the film is clear and sadly, I am not sure the evangelical churches in America are much further along from what is depicted here.

Here is the scene. Let me set this up. Michael W. Smith is the prodigal son of a suburban mega-church pastor who is trying to rehab his image. He's a Christian singer (not too much of a stretch for Smitty) who is instructed by the church elders to serve at the pastor's first church, and current sponsored mission in the 'hood (as it is described.) The pastor of the church located in the inner city is African-American and once a year is invited as a guest to the megachurch for the fund-raising day where money is pledged by church members to keep the inner-city church open. This scene takes place on that Sunday. Knowing this...the scene is self-explanatory.

According to JustWatch, the film is not streaming anywhere at this time, though it may be available on YouTube. 

The Lord's Church

As with most films like this there is a somewhat happy ending, though it is not sugar-coated and simple as many "Christian" films show. I am left with the questions regarding what we are facing in our city, community, and nation now. As evangelical Christians, we must seek to live and be the Lord's church, commissioned as he has called us, living as missionaries in our communities and neighboring ones. Throwing money at a mission (or a cause) is not the answer and is no substitute for living our faith. 

I have no easy 1-2-3 steps for the church, but I know that which is illustrated in this film is not fiction–though I wish it were. 

We must do better.


Juneteenth - A Holiday Many Americans Will Hear About for the First Time Today

I have a prediction.

With all that has been happening related to racial issues in our nation over the past month, especially, it will not be long before Juneteenth is a recognized national holiday.

Currently, the day is recognized in forty-nine states, but rarely is mentioned and most employees do not get the day off.

It was a few years ago that I began posting on our church social media pages about Juneteenth every June. For our predominantly white community and church membership, this holiday is one often not spoken of, and more often than not, not even known about.

6.19_H

It could be said that many of our children are not taught about the holiday because it occurs in the summer and not during the school year, but there are other holidays in the summer and most Americans are fully aware of them. Of course Independence Day should be known by all, but I imagine more Americans have heard of Flag Day than Juneteenth.

I first heard of Juneteenth when I was a high school student in Texas. Sadly, that means for the first sixteen years of my life, I had never known of it.

What Is Juneteenth?

It has been called "Freedom Day" and the "Black Fourth of July." This day, as explained on the website juneteenth.com commemorates the following:

Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States.  Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation - which had become official January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new Executive Order. However, with the surrender of General Lee in April of 1865, and the arrival of General Granger’s regiment, the forces were finally strong enough to influence and overcome the resistance.

It is hard to imagine that black men, women, and children remained slaves in south Texas for over two years following the Emancipation Proclamation. Yet, when you study our American history, this should not be surprising.

Initially, the celebrations of Juneteenth grew and became annual events. These celebrations had little or no impact among the non-black communities. In fact, there was hostility from some toward the former slaves and their children for even desiring to celebrate.

Over time, interest in the annual celebrations waned. The decline is described here:

Economic and cultural forces led to a decline in Juneteenth activities and participants beginning in the early 1900’s. Classroom and textbook education in lieu of traditional home and family-taught practices stifled the interest of the youth due to less emphasis and detail on the lives of former slaves.Classroom textbooks proclaimed Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863 as the date signaling the ending of slavery - and mentioned little or nothing of the impact of General Granger’s arrival on June 19th.

The Depression forced many people off the farms and into the cities to find work. In these urban environments, employers were less eager to grant leaves to celebrate this date. Thus, unless June 19th fell on a weekend or holiday, there were very few participants available. July 4th was already the established Independence holiday and a rise in patriotism steered more toward this celebration. (juneteenth.com)

During the rise of the Civil Rights Movements of the 1950s and 1960s, Juneteenth grew in popularity once more. In 1980, the day became an official Texas state holiday. Since then, many other states have designated the holiday.

June 19, 2020 is Juneteenth and I believe many will be celebrating. Perhaps more this year than in the past. Hopefully we will soon see Juneteenth as a national celebration of freedom, simultaneously reminding us of our sins of the past (repentance and lamentation are good and healthy,) and also of the move toward truly recognizing as a special day in July reminds us that "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.


"The Gathering Storm" by Albert Mohler - Book Review

Dr. Albert Mohler has become one of the best-known Christian leaders in the United States over recent years. As president of The Southern Baptist Seminary (SBTS) he has a particular platform in evangelicalism that offers him opportunities to speak and respond to the many issues impacting the world today from a viewpoint described by Mohler and others as a "biblical worldview." 

I, for one, have appreciated his input on numerous cultural issues, especially over the past decade and a half, as seismic shifts in cultural norms and the now-termed "moral revolution" has sought to change the landscape of our understanding of right and wrong.

In addition to serving as the president of SBTS, Dr. Mohler has a prolific speaking schedule, as he is sought by many to fill pulpits and speak at conferences and special events. He is the host of two podcasts–"The Briefing" and "Thinking in Public." He is also the author of numerous books and this article focuses on his latest published by Thomas Nelson Publishers titled The Gathering Storm: Secularism, Culture, and the Church.

Mohler book
Image from https://www.thomasnelson.com/p/the-gathering-storm/

Churchillian Title

One of Dr. Mohler's favorite figures of history (known to anyone who regularly listens to his podcasts or has visited his personal library) is Sir Winston Churchill. The British Prime Minister, known for his solid and tenacious leadership of the United Kingdom during World War II, wrote the first of his six-volume series on the Second World War covering the growing threat of Nazi Germany. Churchill used the title The Gathering Storm for this volume. Mohler credits Churchill's book title as the reason he chose his book's title.

As the threat of Nazism was growing in Europe, many in the UK and elsewhere minimized Hitler's potential impact and most saw Germany's revival as something that would remain within the German borders, not impacting the neighboring nations, much less the world. Churchill, on the other hand, was a voice crying out for others to take note of the growing threat. When it became clear that Hitler and his powerful Third Reich was bent on European (and eventual global) domination, Churchill seemed prophetic as one who had warned of the storm.

In the same way, Dr. Mohler speaks in this new work of the growing and present threat of secularism to the culture and to the church. This is not a cry heretofore unmade. Dr. Mohler, as well as others, have been speaking of these threats for decades. Not unlike many in the UK who heard but ignored Churchill's warnings, sadly it seems that many Christians have either willingly or unintentionally been ignoring the warnings of secularism to such a degree that now the storm is not simply something that may impact us, it is clear that landfall has occurred.

For those, like me, who live in Florida, hurricane preparedness is a way of life. Floridians have different seasons than other regions in the nation. We have spring, summer, football, and hurricane seasons. When hurricane season begins, we begin to watch our local meteorologists more intently as they share of new storms forming off the west coast of Africa. We know those storms often build up, begin spinning with more intensity, and at times, move from tropical depression to tropical storm to hurricane with eventual impact somewhere in the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico, or the southeastern coast of the US. The "cone of concern" is developed and we watch daily wondering if we will be impacted personally. Watching the daily hurricane updates is like watching a turtle run a race. It's slow and plodding and uncertain...until it isn't.

Hurricane Warnings

Living in a state where hurricanes are part of our annual schedules, there are often times where warnings are given, but ignored by many. It is akin to the ignoring the flight attendants in commercial flights as they give instructions regarding how to wear the seatbelt, put on oxygen masks, and emergency exit rules. Since most who have flown numerous times have never experienced an in-flight emergency, these repeated warnings go unheard. Yet, when something mid-flight does occur and the oxygen masks fall from the console, it is clear that many would be doing their best to remember what was said pre-flight as they slide into panic.

In our culture wars and shifting sands of morality and rightness, the storm is no longer on the way. It is here. For those who have listened to Dr. Mohler's daily podcast "The Briefing" and at times felt overwhelmed with the data and daily updates of issues that run counter to a biblical worldview, his new book is a welcome resource. Many of the illustrations and delineated accounts in the book have been covered at some point by Dr. Mohler in one of his briefings, but to have the book available giving a systematic unveiling of the history of secularism and the subtle (and overt) impacts of this philosophy in our lives is telling and helpful. In some cases, the shifts have seemed immediate (e.g. the 2015 Obergefell vs. Hodges Supreme Court case legalizing same-sex marriage) but in truth are simply the latest visible impacts of the storm gusts upon culture.

Responding to Landfall

When hurricanes make landfall, the impact varies depending on wind speed, the structural strength of the buildings nearby, the depth and health of the roots of trees, and the preparedness of residents. Once the storm has passed, disaster relief teams arrive (many wearing yellow hats representing Southern Baptists serving and helping in Christ's name,) damage assessment occurs, and next steps for recovery begin. 

Unlike a natural hurricane, the storm we now face seems to be only increasing in intensity with an ever-widening cone of concern with no end in sight. Yet, as Christians we are affirmed that as we stand firmly on the gospel of Christ, though a narrow foot-hold certainly, we will not only withstand the storm, but thrive in its midst and in the aftermath. So, be encouraged.

In Dr. Mohler's book, he focuses on nine specific issues impacted by the rising secularism. Sadly, this is not only a secular, godless worldview present outside the church, but also at times visible within. The chapter titles categorize these areas so the reader can more clearly see that which has occurred and is occurring. Chapters speaking of "The Gathering Storm in..."

  • Western Civilization
  • The Church
  • Human Life
  • Marriage
  • Family
  • Gender and Sexuality
  • Generational Divides
  • Engines of Culture
  • Religious Liberty

After reading The Gathering Storm, I cannot help but see indicators of the growing secularization and worldview shifts daily as new headlines appear on my newsfeed. In fact, yesterday, the US Supreme Court ruled in what I deem a disastrous ruling, that "that 'sex' does, in fact, include sexual orientation and gender identity, despite the fact that legislators repeatedly voted against including those categories in the legislation." (ERLC - "After the Bostock Supreme Court Case") Where would this lie in Dr. Mohler's analysis? It is clearly part of the storm related to gender and sexuality, but also impactful in the area of religious liberty, not to mention family and generational divides.

This is just one headline from today. 

One can simply peruse other current and recent stories to see how the moral revolution and the rise of secularism continues to impact all avenues of our culture on a daily basis.

What Now?

Dr. Mohler's concluding chapter hearkens once more to Churchill's warnings prior to World War II. While Churchill, along with the other Allied leaders, entered into the storm against Nazism, fascism, and imperial despotism with a united, military campaign that proved to be essential for victory, Dr. Mohler is not calling for a militaristic movement. He is, however, clearly reminding the church that what we face today is truly a battle. The church has been in this spiritual battle since the very beginning, but the storm of secularism is our most recent and current beachhead.

Dr. Mohler gives reasoned, practical, and timelessly biblical encouragement and insight into how Christians and the church must live in such times. The concluding chapter is titled "Into the Storm" and that certainly is our calling. 

I recommend The Gathering Storm highly and encourage readers to subscribe to "The Briefing" for continued daily updates of current trends and shifts in culture from a biblical worldview.

Insightful Quotes from The Gathering Storm

  • A central fact of the storm now gathering strength is moral liberalism, which cannot be explained without the dechristianization of society. (xv)
  • Secularizing societies move into conditions in which there is less and less theistic belief and authority until there is hardly even a memory that such a binding authority had ever existed. (5)
  • We do not need a political movement. We need a theological protest. (13)
  • A true church does not give a non-answer to a direct biblical question. (27)
  • What morally atrocious age we have slipped into where we sacrifice babies on the altar of "women's health, autonomy, and their right to the pursuit of happiness"? (47)
  • Secularism has paganized the culture. Pagans speak of holy things as if they were lowly while speaking of lowly things as if they were holy. (64-65)
  • The headlines will continue down this trend–we will see not only liberals versus conservatives but revolutionaries versus revolutionaries; feminist ideology versus transgender ideology; gay and lesbian activism against transgender activism. (97)
  • We should lament the brokenness and understand the many failings of the Christian church toward those who identify with the LGBTQ+ community. But we dare not add yet another failure to those failures. (115)
  • In response to the storm gathering over gender and sexuality, Christians must do at least two things: preach true gospel liberty in the face of erotic liberty and stand ready to receive the refugees of the sexual revolution. (119)
  • Teenagers have been listening carefully. They have been observing their parents in the larger culture with diligence and insight. They understand just how little their parents really believe and just how much many of their churches and Christian institutions have accommodated themselves to the dominant culture. (128)
  • Liberalism often fails to distinguish between conservatives and the extremists on the right. this can be driven by intention or by carelessness, but the result is the same. (153)
  • Consider the fact that religious liberty is now described as religious privilege. By definition, a privilege is not a right. (166)
  • Where you find failing churches and denominations, you find a loss of faith in God. (191)

 


Are You Pastoring the "Kobayashi Maru" Church of the No-Win Scenario?

The "Kobayashi Maru" likely does not ring a bell for most people, but for the few who grew up watching the original Star Trek television series and then enjoyed seeing Captain Kirk, Spock, Dr. McCoy and the rest of the crew of the starship Enterprise when they jumped to the big screen the reference is clear. The introduction of the Kobayashi Maru was in the film Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (the best Star Trek movie, by the way.) The Kobayashi Maru was the name of a fictional ship (even fictional in the fictional universe of Star Trek) that was created as a training exercise for Starfleet officers. The ship was in a battle with the evil Klingons and the trainee was to guide his/her ship to the rescue and win the day. Yet, in this exercise, the Kobayashi Maru was always destroyed, regardless what the trainee did. (For those who actually care, click here for a clip of the scene.)

The 1982 film opens with Saavik in the command chair, leading her crew made up of original series stars into the battle, only to see crew members die and the Maru destroyed. It was truly a dramatic scene when first viewed in the theaters back in the 1980s. Soon after the destruction and defeat, the scene shifts and the hero, Captain Kirk walks from behind a wall and makes it clear that Saavik, not unlike others, has failed the test. 

It's a short scene, but has become over time a reminder of what is known as the "no win scenario." It was repeated in J.J. Abrams rebooted Star Trek starring Chris Pine in 2009 as well as numerous books, reference works, and fan fiction.

(Okay, you figured it out by now, I am a Star Trek nerd. No apologies. Live long and prosper. Now read the rest.)

The No-Win Scenario

Sometimes in pastoral ministry, leading the people in the church God has called you to serve feels like a no-win scenario. That's a foreboding thought and not necessarily one that comes to mind when one surrenders to full-time ministry and is called to serve as pastor in the local church. Nevertheless, as I have discovered over the years and in talking with many other pastors, the thoughts of leading a church through cultural changes and missional engagement seems to be a no-win.

Church Members Divided

There have always been divisive issues among Christians within the church. Some are primary issues that must be addressed with no compromise. These would be issues of biblical fidelity, trinitarian teaching, doctrinal clarity, etc. There is really no debate on whether or not to stand firmly on such issues. To do otherwise is an affront to biblical Christianity and leaves the church open, if not embracing, false teachings and teachers.

There are, however, divisive issues that often rise up among church members that have nothing to do with first priority issues. They are not doctrinal. They are not biblical issues. Many have written about such divisions and articles on theological triage by Dr. Albert Mohler (here) and podcasts featuring Dr. Jason Allen and Dr. Gavin Ortlund (here) have addressed such clearly. 

Today's Trending Church Divides

There will always be issues that rise up causing division among church members. Most recently, that division centers around church responses to COVID-19 and how congregations are planning to meet in person again for worship. These are not insignificant issues, but as we all know, the opinions vary greatly on how one must respond and what must be done. Whether it is the use of chemical cleaners in the church facilities, the enforcing of social distancing, the forced locations for seating in worship, or guidelines regarding wearing/not wearing masks, the opinions are there - within every church, and they differ greatly depending on whom is speaking. 

I have received numerous emails and text messages from other pastors and have had a number of conversations with men in our community asking how we are addressing such. These are not isolated issues. Yet, as one pastor mentioned to me, "This is a no-win scenario." Thus...the Star Trek-Kobayashi Maru comparison. 

Captain David
Taken years ago when I had darker hair and a set for Star Trek existed in South Georgia

I was in a meeting earlier this month (not a Christian ministry or church related one) with friends from the community and one man dared to share his opinion related to being required to wear masks. I watched as another jumped into the conversation and the soon-escalating discussion revealed that no resolution would be found. Opinions are very strong. Fortunately, the moderator of the meeting kindly shut down the conversation and we moved forward (and these men remain friends, so no harm, hopefully.) This revealed once more that divisiveness is natural in a sinful world. The challenge facing pastors is shepherding through what some have called a no-win scenario.

Beyond COVID-19 and other pandemic related talking points, we now face the greater, and I believe the more serious divide relating to racial unity, police actions, government responsibilities, and all that has developed since George Floyd's death in Minneapolis.

If you thought opinions on issues within the church related to carpet color, music style, schedule changes, pandemic response, and all were big, you now know they pale in comparison to these even more potentially divisive chasms among those who not only are brothers and sisters in Christ, but covenant members of the same fellowship.

For the pastor wondering what to do...it seems like a no-win scenario.

Changing the Conditions by Clarifying the Calling

In Star Trek lore, the only Starfleet cadet to ever beat the no-win scenario of the Kobayashi Maru was James T. Kirk (of course.) When asked by Saavik how he did it, Kirk responded with "I reprogrammed the simulation so that it was possible to rescue the ship."

Immediately, his son David Marcus says "He cheated," to which Kirk replies "I changed the conditions of the test. Got a commendation for original thinking. I don't like to lose."

It's a gutsy move for the movie's hero, but in the church there is no "reprogramming" of the scenario. Some pastors desire to change the conditions and at times, they do. In some cases, these are incredibly positive shifts that lead to church health and biblically strong congregations. Sometimes, however, the conditions change simply because the pastor leaves. At times by his choice and God's calling. Sadly, at times due to the church's lack of desire to follow God's man's lead. 

However, all pastors realize in their ministry how easy it is to be distracted by secondary and tertiary items to such a degree that the primary ones are forsaken.

I know this is overly simplified and actually doesn't address specific things to be done regarding COVID-19 issues much less the issues of  racial unity among believers. I am not offering step-by-step fixes for such dynamic and serious issues. Please know I am not minimizing these either, but I do believe that pastors must first and foremost remember that the calling to lead a church is not the calling to be a CEO or Director of Activities. He is not placed by God to just tickle the ears of the congregation so that offerings will continue. The pastor is not called to be the political action committee chairman or a puppet for any group in a community or region.

The pastor is called first to God, then to his church where God has placed him to pray, study, serve, protect the flock, and proclaim the Word. 

There are many sub-points for each of these responsibilities. For example, protecting the flock is a biblical mandate and covers not only protection from false teaching (primary) but also from other issues (e.g. pandemic.) Proclaiming the truth of the Word and allowing the Scripture to speak clearly is primarily for the preaching of sermons but also speaks into cultural injustices of which there are many (e.g. life, racism, abuse, inequality, health, etc.) not from worldly devised talking points, but from biblically grounded truth.

My denomination's statement of faith, the Baptist Faith & Message (2000), delineates our beliefs regarding the Word of God...

The Holy Bible was written by men divinely inspired and is God's revelation of Himself to man. It is a perfect treasure of divine instruction. It has God for its author, salvation for its end, and truth, without any mixture of error, for its matter. Therefore, all Scripture is totally true and trustworthy. It reveals the principles by which God judges us, and therefore is, and will remain to the end of the world, the true center of Christian union, and the supreme standard by which all human conduct, creeds, and religious opinions should be tried. All Scripture is a testimony to Christ, who is Himself the focus of divine revelation.

An open, read, studied, and proclaimed Bible reveals, without error, God's truth and his answers to the issues of sin and suffering in our world. The Scriptures, inspired by the Holy Spirit, reveals the truth of the Gospel so that we may know the Father through the Son. 

Sometimes when it seems the issues we face as pastors fall under the category of the "no-win scenario" we must remember that the true win...the ultimate win...the primary win is found in Christ alone. 

I know for some that sounds like a trite answer to the very real issues and sinful hardships being experienced by many today. Please understand that despite all that we are suffering through, the One who is the "Suffering Servant," the Way, the Truth, the Life has been, and must always be THE point. 

To quote the great theologian James Tiberius Kirk (that's a joke) "I don't believe in the no-win scenario." 

With all that we face in our world today, I rest in knowing that our sovereign God is never taken by surprise and in him is the victory, the win. Press on pastors - just keep the main thing the main thing.


George Floyd, Justice, and a Longing for Change

Is this some horror-story version of the movie Groundhog Day?

We have heard this story, or similar ones, before. 

"A black man is killed by a police officer - film at eleven."

"Video footage of the killing of a black man taken by bystanders with smartphones."

"Surveillance video shows black man prior to killing."

"Protests erupt after the killing of black man."

"Celebrities and athletes tweet their feelings regarding the killing of black man."

We have been here before. And...like you, I am ready for this version of Groundhog Day to stop. If it doesn't, more violence and killing will occur.

George Floyd

This time the story centers around a Minneapolis police officer arresting a black man named George Floyd for allegedly passing a counterfeit twenty dollar bill in a convenience store. I won't attempt to describe the event in detail here because news agencies are doing analysis and showing video accounts on every platform they have available.

I did watch the video once, and not unlike the videos of similar stories in the past (sadly, in the recent past) one viewing is enough.

I personally have similar feelings as when I heard of Ahmaud Arbery's death in Brunswick, Georgia (link here.) Yet, in the case of George Floyd, the story shifts due to involving active-duty police officers.

I have had messages from police officer friends since this incident in Minnesota revealing their feelings. The ones I have talked with and the posts I have read show a deep anger. 

One officer told me - "Incidents like this takes away anything positive that officers do for the public. I can't imagine any situation where what they did would be acceptable." 

The story in Minneapolis continues. The officer in question has been relieved of duty. Protesters are calling for his arrest. The mayor is calling for his arrest. Those desiring to be on the news for a moment, whether celebrities or laypeople, are calling for his arrest.

He will likely be arrested.

But while all that is happening and the frenzy and calls for justice continue, let me share with you something from a pastor who used to serve in Houston, where George Floyd lived prior to being in Minnesota.

I did not know George Floyd. His background is being unearthed for news stories and you can read those accounts if you choose. His character is being either uplifted or degraded depending on the agenda of the ones posting or talking of him. Sadly, this too is part of the repeated stories whenever an tragedy like this occurs. It is wrong.

I also do not know this pastor personally, but we do have a few mutual friends. The pastor's name is Justin Bouldin. He now serves in North Carolina, but in 2015 he served in Houston. Justin posted this on his Facebook page (available here.)

Let me tell you about George...

My family and I moved to 3rd Ward (Houston, TX) back in August 2015. We moved there to serve as church planting residents at Resurrection Houston, a church that gathered and had their HQ right there in the Tre. The church also dedicated itself to serving a large housing complex called Cuney Homes. Cuney was nestled right in the heart of 3rd Ward, across the street from TSU.

When we arrived, the church was in the midst of planning a 3 on 3 basketball tournament at Cuney. It was a way to bring a day of positive energy, lots of fun, and just love our neighbors well.

The day of the tournament was your typical hot, sun-drenched August day in H-Town. But that didn’t matter because there were so many people out there on and around the courts that day.

George played on one of the teams that were entered in the tournament. (In fact, they ended up winning the whole thing.) During some games where they weren’t playing, I happened to get to sit beside and talk to George for a few minutes. He knew I was with RH and I introduced myself as the “new guy” (New Drew is how I said it to all the Cuney residents) who was serving with them and in Cuney Homes.

As we watched the games in front of us, George had these words and I will always remember them. He said:

“We need more of this in our community. See how everyone is out here, having fun and not worried about no nonsense. We need more positive opportunities for our people and that’s why I’m so glad Rez Houston is out here. Y’all always showin love and keeping it real for these youth. They need it more than anything.”

That was George. A guy who knew where he was from and never made excuses. He wanted a better life for himself, but also for his neighbors.

In fact, the picture on the left is the next day at our church service we had at Cuney. George and his team came to service and we recognized them as the champs from the previous day!

George floyd

But that wasn’t out of the ordinary. George would always help us put out and fold up chairs when we would have Church in the Bricks. My brother Ronnie Lillard (Reconcile) told how George helped him drag the baptismal out there so we could baptize people who had professed faith in Jesus.

Ronnie, Corey PaulNijalon DuBoi James DunnP.T. Ngwolo can tell you so many more stories of George and how he was one of the people of peace that helped open the door for Rez to become a part of the Cuney community and share the hope of Jesus with so many.

My heart is broken this morning after weeping last night. My heart hurts for our Cuney and 3rd Ward family for the tragic loss of yet another life. From what I have heard, the whole reason George was in Minnesota was because the seeds that had been planted and watered all those years were starting to take root. He was pursuing and taking steps of repentance and following Jesus.

But not only am I heartbroken, I am filled with anger. I want to say it is righteous and I pray to God He hears me, but I am tired of the character assassination and same M.O. every time something like this happens. This is so raw for me right now because I personally knew the man. I got brothers and sisters that literally spent so much time pouring into his life and watching the Lord work miracles. (The last picture was a recent message from George to Nijalon that he sent while he was in Minnesota.)

It hits different when you know the victim and have seen the real character. It sickens me that people who do not know him and have never encountered him want to freely throw out garbage takes about how he should’ve done this or probably did something to warrant what happened.

Justin writes more and you can read that on his page, but what he shares here goes hand-in-hand with a point I made last Sunday in my sermon. 

When we begin to see people as image-bearers of Christ, with friends, family members, siblings, etc., rather than just as unnamed, non-important characters in a news story then perhaps our culturally fueled insensitivity to violence and injustice will be piqued. 

I'm Praying for a New Day

Did George do something wrong that day? Did he break a law? Did he pass a counterfeit bill? I don't know. I do know based on what the videos show and after hearing from police officers who serve faithfully and honestly in their own communities that the actions and results in Minneapolis were unjust, wrong, evil, and ultimately deadly. 

Like you, I am seeing tweets and postings (not unlike this one) from numerous pastors and church leaders in our religious sub-group of evangelicalism. I know that Jesus Christ and a changed heart is the only thing that will cure this sin-saturated world. I know that. My fellow pastors of all shades of melanin know that. 

I also know that in order for this version of "Groundhog Day" to end, something has to change. I am praying for God's lead in what the next step will be. I am asking for wisdom for pastors and church leaders as we seek to respond righteously, and lead under God's direction toward a new day, not a day of temporal racial reconciliation, but of true unity in Christ.

I pray for a day when calling for justice does not get a Christian blasted for being anything other than true to God's Word.

I pray for a day when seeking to understand how brothers and sisters experience daily life in our communities does not come with accusations of abandoning the sufficiency of God and his Word.

I pray for a day when our children and grandchildren can sing the old song "Jesus loves the little children of the world...red and yellow, black and white, they are precious in his sight" and realize that Jesus does love all and that because he does, we must too.

I pray for a day when white people will stop saying "I don't see color" when referencing a person of darker melanin. I understand the sentiment is "I'm not racist" but the words actually say "I don't value your unique heritage and viewpoint."

I pray for a day when virtue signaling will end and true, God-fueled love for each other will reign.

I pray for a day when men like George Floyd will remain known only to his family, friend group, basketball playing buddies, and local church brothers and sisters and not to the entire world because of a tragedy that turns him into a hashtag.

I pray for this day.

And I know it is coming. 

He who testifies to these things says, “Surely I am coming soon.” Amen. Come, Lord Jesus! - Revelation 22:20 (ESV)


Why I Will Only Hire an Associate Pastor/Ministry Leader Who Is Willing to Leave Our Church

The era of the church growth movement along with its structure of specialized ministry led to multi-staffed churches with numerous associate pastors, assistant pastors, age-graded pastors, ministry interns, directors of ministry. etc. over the years.

I am not saying these ministry positions are wrong. We have godly people serving in these and other positions at our church. In fact, I served as a youth minister, student pastor (same thing as a youth minister, but a more professional sounding title,) singles and collegiate pastor, and young married adults pastor prior to being called to serve as the senior pastor (or lead pastor, or better yet, just "pastor") of the church I currently serve. It was during these years as an associate I know God prepared, honed, and developed me to serve in the role I now have. Still, there are many days I feel unqualified for this pastoral role (not biblically unqualified...just a bit amazed that God would see fit to choose me to serve him this way.)

As years go by, ministry models for evangelical churches shift. Whether purpose-driven, attractional, event-oriented, emergent, missional, or any other trending term of the day, church leadership tends to always be looking for the next silver bullet for church growth and ministry. (By the way, there's no silver bullet. Daniel Im has written about this. Check out the book trailer here.

The Rise of Church Planting

For the past twelve years or so, we have seen a dramatic increase in the planting of new churches in America. Denominational mission agencies, like our North American Mission Board (NAMB), have strategically shifted to enable planters to relocate to urban settings and fast-growing areas for the purpose of increasing the churches in areas where the numbers of unchurched or de-churched continues to increase. NAMB is not alone. Numerous other groups have been and are planting churches. Planters are responding to God's call to leave the comparative safety of the known church culture of home and relocate their families to areas that cause many church members and family members to say "Why would you do that?" 

I won't go into all the reasons church planting is needed today. There are many stories and statistics showing how God is using this era of church planting for his glory.

Where Do We Get Planters?

As a pastor of what is now termed a "legacy church" (that means we are an older, established church that has been in the same community for decades) I have sought to lead our church to not only be supportive of church planting, but to be a sending church raising up men and women to go. At some point, the Great Commission has to be more than theoretical.

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I wish I could say we have batted 1.000 doing this, but ... it has been a learning process. We have sent out some planters and families who are serving the Lord faithfully. These are incredible stories of long-term ministry and we remain partnered and engaged with them. There are others we have met and come alongside for a season.

Staffing the Church Differently

One of my pastor friends who served in a Virginia church years ago led me to think more strategically about church planting and the concept of sending planters. This was years prior to NAMB producing the Send Network and before I had ever heard of Acts29, ARC, Vision360 or any other church planting movement. 

My friend told me he would not hire an associate pastor (e.g. worship pastor, student pastor, teaching pastor, etc.) to serve on staff with him unless that man was willing to leave the church to either start a new church or help start one.

My first reaction was "What?!?"

Why would I respond this way? Because my life experience in church was very traditional. I knew that churches hired staff members intending they remain on staff at the church for years. If at any time, a staff person left the church...even in good standing...it would only be to go to another church (most often after a series of secret interviews without letting the pastor know,) in another city, to serve in a similar role but with better pay.

But, to hire someone expecting them to leave to pastor a new church...in a nearby community perhaps, much less the same one, was unheard of. That only happened when churches split. At least that was my understanding and experience.

Oh, how things change. That crazy idea from my pastor friend has proven to be biblical, right, and good for the kingdom. In his case, the result has been a number of new churches in the same area of Virginia, as well as other communities throughout the world (thanks to God calling those stationed to nearby military bases being transferred to other areas and starting new churches.) 

Is Everyone Called To Church Planting?

I mentioned in a meeting yesterday that not everyone is called to church planting. At that point a church planter in the meeting said "I think they are."

I thought about that and...I think he's right.

While not everyone is called to move to a new church plant, I do believe that in order to be Great Commission Christians, we are all called to church planting, to the expansion of God's church throughout the world, even in areas where some in the community say "We have enough churches around here."

The truth is that we do not have enough churches. We may have more churches than Starbucks and gas stations in some communities, but there truly is no region where there are enough churches. How can I say this? Because I know that there are still unsaved people everywhere. While the church does not save them, God has always and will continue to use his church through the power of the Holy Spirit to draw people to himself. 

So, I have shifted my thinking. 

I believe now, as my friend did years ago, that every associate pastor and ministry staff person at our church must be willing and ready to leave our church in order to help plant and start new churches. This is much different than being ready to leave to go to another church with more programs and better pay (but that happens, too.) 

Gone are the days when an associate pastor will be hired with the expectation he remain in the position for decades. He may remain there, but he must be willing to abandon that particular area of ministry for where God calls.

However, it must be noted that just because someone in an associate position wants to be a church planter, it does not mean he should. That's where the value of assessment and long-term strategic planning comes in. These do not supersede the call, but I know God has used these tools to help men secure and solidify where and if God is calling to plant a church. 

Frustration in ministry is not the best determiner for a change in ministry.

What This Means for the Church

It means that church members need to understand that ultimately every pastoral staff member is called by God and affirmed by the church to serve. If, or when, God calls that associate pastor to step out in faith to plant (or assist in planting) a new church, he must be free to do so (pending wise counsel and clear assessment.) Ideally, the new church plant led by the former staff member will be supported and provided for by the church where he previously served.

Healthy churches plant churches.

Healthy churches send planters.

Healthy churches support their planters with prayer, people, and provision.

Healthy churches look upward and outward more than inward.

Our church has not "arrived," so we are not necessarily the best model for doing this well. Yet, we are now doing more than just talking the talk. I have instructed every staff person in our church that at no point do I see their position here to be their finish line. It could end up being the last place of serving in full-time ministry for some, but the willingness to go must never be erased. It must never be squelched. 

It may mean that a beloved staff member leaves for a new work. It may mean that some faithful church members go with him to help plant the new work. It may mean that, if needed, another person is hired to do the work previously done by the planter. It may mean all of this and more. It likely will. And this is good.

Kingdom work supersedes our kingdom work (little "k"). 

May we see more churches planted by legacy churches. We all say that churches plant churches. It's time for more churches to actually do this rather than leaving planters out there on their own hoping to land on their feet. 


The Price May Be Right, But the Agenda Is Wrong

The year 2020 is definitely not proving to be what many anticipated on January 1. Just to add to the odd and disappointing stories we seem to be getting daily, we now have "The Price Is Right" promoting the culture of death.
 
A decades-old game show that was known for big wheel spins, 70s era stage decorations, a yodeling cardboard mountain climber, encouragements to spay and neuter your pets, and the phrases "Come on down!" and "A NEW CAR!" is now promoting the culture of death and the normalization of drag queen culture through a special where RuPaul was guest and approximately $100,000 was donated to Planned Parenthood. (More here.)
 
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Photo credit: Digitas Photos on Visualhunt / CC BY
 
Like you, it seems like any time anyone or any show promotes anything that can be divisive a group of online angry protestors arrive ready to share their displeasure publicly. Social media normally blows up for a day or so as people publicly vent. In most cases, I just keep scrolling down my timeline trying not to get sucked into the latest online rant.
 
Maybe I should have done so today.
 
Instead, it seems I am joining the group of online public ranters. Why? Because the culture of death and acceptance of abortion as simply a woman's choice continues to find its way into otherwise unrelated stories, reminding me that to be pro-life requires continued diligence and prayer.
 
You (the collective you, as in "you all" or "y'all" depending where you live) have the freedom to watch whatever you choose on television or streaming service, but can we please retire this oft-stated question and statement?
 
"Can't we just watch a show for the entertainment value? Not every show has an agenda, right?"
NOPE.
 
The truth is that every produced show making it on air has an agenda. Every prerecorded presentation has an agenda. How do I know this? Because as human beings, we ALL have agendas. I do not disagree with every agenda, by the way. In fact, I have an agenda every time I preach on Sunday. 

It Is About the Worldview

Worldviews exist. They matter greatly. They are the lenses through which we see the world. The biblical worldview sees through the lens of biblical revelation and truth. The challenge is to remove the glasses naturally given to all that view things only through a cultural worldview. The cultural lenses provide a view that filters everything through our own experiences, our own beliefs of how things should be, and what we desire to be true.

A person’s worldview is immensely important. As believers in Christ, we find that our spiritual battles play out where worldviews draw lines.

Norman Geisler speaks of how a worldview not only determines how we live, but how we die.

The truth is that a worldview is like colored glasses; it colors everything at which we look. It is a grid through which one views all of life. As such, it helps form our thoughts, values, and decisions. The tragedy is that most people do not even know what their worldview is, how they got it, and how important it is in their lives.1

How we get our worldview speaks of the authority we follow. Dr. Danny Akin states that there are four sources of authority that mold and shape our decision-making and way of life:

  1. Reason (I think)
  2. Experience (I feel)
  3. Tradition (I have always done)
  4. Revelation (God says in his Word)

These authorities (often more than just one) will govern how we live.2

As for "The Price Is Right," I'm not calling for a boycott. It is just a TV show. Outside of stay-at-home pandemic requirements, I have not watched or been able to watch the daytime version for years. Regarding the special that aired this week - I chose not to watch. I am not sure boycotting something I do not watch is really effective.
 
Yet, I do believe strongly that the culture of death disguised as women's health care promoted by Planned Parenthood is something to speak against. The agenda that seeks to normalize the drag-queen culture and all that comes with it also stands in opposition to biblical truth.
 
Agendas are everywhere and the agenda of infanticide as simple choice continues to permeate our culture. 
 
I'm reminded of the children's song I learned so many years ago "Be careful little eyes what you see... Be careful little ears what you hear..." The song is pretty weird, but the sentiment is clear. What we see and hear impacts what we believe. Worldviews matter and they are developed daily through what is seen, heard, and believed. 
 
On this game show, the price may be right for the Rice-A-Roni, but the subtle (and not so subtle) messages regarding culture are wrong.
 

See to it that no one takes you captive by philosophy and empty deceit, according to human tradition, according to the elemental spirits of the world, and not according to Christ. Colossians 2:8 (ESV)

 
_________
           1Gary W. Phillips, William E. Brown, and John Stonestreet, Making Sense of Your World: A Biblical Worldview, 2nd ed. (Salem, WI: Sheffield, 2008), vii.
 
           2Daniel L. Akin, Christ-Centered Exposition: Exalting Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount (Nashville: Broadman and Holman, 2019), 148.
 

"The Gospel According to Satan" by Jared C. Wilson - Book Review

I'm slowly working through the stack of books in my home office that I intended to read during the COVID-19 quarantine. Let's just say that I struggle to find the time to read as much as I would like, even when it seems I should have more available time.

I recently completed Jared C. Wilson's latest book The Gospel According to Satan. Apparently, there are half a dozen books available with the same title on Amazon, covering a variety of subjects that could be considered Satan's gospel, so be careful when ordering your copy of the book. Get the one with the cover below and this subtitle "Eight Lies About God That Sound Like the Truth."

Gospel satanWilson is an accomplished writer with numerous books focusing on the Christian life, church, theology, and more. Prior to the release of The Gospel According to Satan, our church staff read The Gospel-Driven Church together (a recommended read for any pastor or church leader.) This led to numerous healthy conversations regarding the focus of church ministries and the need to continue shifting away from the easy draw of "attractionalism" as a church marketing tool.

The title and cover of his latest book is intriguing. As one who grew up in the 1980s, this initially seemed like it could be a Ronnie James Dio song (or maybe a Stryper song for those in the church youth group?")

While the title could lead one to believe this is a deep dive into spiritual warfare or demonology, it is not as some would think. It is about the lies of the enemy. There are clearly points related to the demonic lies that permeate our world, but Wilson's book delves into what some may say is the subtlety that characterizes the one who first said to God's image-bearers "Did God really say...?"

Wilson states early that the writing of this book was spurred after the publication and popularity of William Paul Young's book Lies We Believe About God. I had almost forgotten about Young, most well-known as author of The Shack (not recommended by the way.) Young's faulty theology sounds like other heresies that have arisen throughout the centuries. As Tim Challies stated in his review of Young's book, "There is barely a chapter in the book that does not do damage to one or more precious doctrines. " (full review here on challies.com)

Thus, Wilson began putting together the outline that would eventually become The Gospel According to Satan. Wilson carefully deconstructs a number of well-known and oft-stated "truths" about life and God. These statements are not reserved for those outside the church, but have even crept into the current evangelical lexicon and when stated enough by those who claim to be children of God, eventually are believed by many to be true. 

The lies of the enemy began in Eden with the "Did God really say...?" question as mentioned prior, but also fall under the categorical accusation that "God is holding out on you." Wilson goes to these as the main plays in the enemy's playbook and and helps the reader see that the deception is so subtle that many well-meaning Christians find themselves doing just as Adam and Eve did by believing lies that that comprise this "gospel" according to Satan.

The chapters are titled as follow:

  • LIE #1: God Just Wants You to Be Happy
  • LIE #2: You Only Live Once
  • LIE #3: You Need to Live Your Truth
  • LIE #4: Your Feelings Are Reality
  • LIE #5: Your Life Is What You Make It
  • LIE #6: You Need to Let Go and Let God
  • LIE #7: The Cross Is Not About Wrath
  • LIE #8: God Helps Those Who Help Themselves

These lies likely sound familiar. The challenge is when you read one of these lies and think "What? I say that all the time. I'm not sure that's a lie." Thus...the need for the book. 

Wilson cuts no corners on relaying the depths of biblical theology and doctrinal soundness in refuting these lies. Yet, when reading his book it seems as if you're sitting across a table at a coffee shop discussing these things with the author. This ability by a writer is definitely a skill to be admired, and perhaps a gift. As Wilson dissects the aforementioned lies, there is no condescension offered to the reader. This is the loving invitation to see how that which is commonly believed by many actually stands at opposition to the true gospel.

Wilson's transparency regarding personal thoughts, challenges, and issues appear throughout the book. By the end of the book, you feel as if someone who loves the Lord dearly actually loves you as well (even if he never has met you) simply because you too are an image-bearer of God.

The lies are shared as life-or-death warnings, and truly they are. 

This book will be the next one our staff reads together. This time, it won't be a focus so much on the shifting away from a church ministry process, but a focus on the subtle shifts away from gospel truth that we all re susceptible to believe.

I highly recommend the book and am glad it was near the top of my stack of quarantine books.


A Young Black Man Is Killed in Brunswick and I Am Angry, Grieved, a Bit Ashamed, and Convicted

The video hit social media yesterday.

I saw it on my Twitter feed, not knowing the story. 

I hit PLAY. 

And, then I sat in silence.

"What did I just watch?"

"Is this real?"

"Wait...this wasn't for some YouTube crowd-funded movie? This wasn't a promo for a television show? This wasn't a 'filmed on an iPhone' television show like the latest episode of 'All Rise'?"

THIS REALLY HAPPENED!?!

IN BRUNSWICK, GEORGIA?

Yes. It did. It happened to a young man named Ahmaud Arbery.

Screenshot 2020-05-06 13.14.52

Just a short drive north of where I live in Jacksonville?

What?!? Oh my! 

I then watched another update online. I saw the 9-1-1 transcripts of the calls made by the shooters and then realized this video was not made two days ago. It was filmed in February! Two months ago.

And then...well... I became angry, grieved, a bit ashamed, and convicted.

Angry

I am angry that in 2020, in the midst of a global pandemic that has changed so much in regards to social interaction, where the normal banter and noise we hear has paused just a bit while we are being told by a bevy of politicians, leaders, and celebrities that "We're all in this together," that the murder of a young man in a south Georgia community could happen as it did. I am angry that this happened, much less in broad daylight, on a neighborhood street, by those seemingly desiring to take justice into their own hands. 

I fully concede that I do not know the full details of the story. I don't believe many do.

What I do know is what has been reported through numerous media outlets (from various perspectives.) The end result is a young black man was gunned down while jogging through a neighborhood. The reasoning given was that he was believed by those with the guns to have been one who had burgled some homes in the community. Regardless, even if he did (and I am absolutely NOT saying that he did) this apparent vigilantism is criminal. 

Now a young man is dead.

A family grieves. 

Friends are hurting.

And "We're all in this together" fades to the back as the Enemy pulls out a card he has played since sin he entered the human story. A card that caused hurt, pain, division, and death in our nation for decades. A card that reminds us of the most heinous self-inflicted wound of our national identity. A card that categorized some people as fully human while others were considered only three-fifths human. A card that tells us all that the game may not have changed as much as we thought or hoped.

Some call it the "race card." 

It's a tool of the Enemy and if it were truly a playing card, the number on it would be 666.

I am angry. I pray it is a righteous anger.

I am angry that two months have gone by with what appears to be very little done regarding justice and due process of the law. While I understand the wheels of justice move slowly and precariously (especially during a pandemic,) two months in this situation seems too long.

Grieved

I grieve because a life has been taken. I grieve because I have been with families when notifications of loved ones deaths have been delivered. I have been with police officers after deadly incidents have occurred. I have seen the realization in the loved one appear when the message "I'm sorry to inform you that..." has been delivered. I grieve because I imagine how the family of Ahmaud felt when notified of his death.

I grieve because an image-bearer of God is dead.

I grieve because we live in a culture where a report of a young black man being killed can be shared on the news and many immediately think "Well, it was probably gang related," or "He was where he shouldn't have been," or "I bet he had a terrible family life," or some other stereotypical excuse as we scroll to the next story without ever contemplating the reality that these responses are sinful.

Certainly, there are young black men killed in situations where these descriptors are true (as well as young hispanic, latino, asian, and white men) but we (meaning me) all too often find ourselves going to these explanations for the untimely deaths of the often unnamed young men. This reveals that as a nation, as Americans, as individuals we have not grown as much as we had hoped, or perhaps as has been declared by some.

I have African-American friends who are having conversations with their children that I never felt the need to have with mine. Young black men on our local high school basketball teams that I know come to mind today. I know these young men personally. I know their families. They young men have so much potential for their lives, as do their teammates with varying degrees of melanin in their skin and differing cultural heritages. Yet, I wonder if these black young men, or their parents, are more concerned today about them running through their neighborhoods to stay in shape during this off-season than they were three days ago? Are they more concerned than the parents of white young men? I am certain they are.

This grieves me.

A Bit Ashamed

Why would I be ashamed?

What do I have to do with this story in Brunswick, Georgia?

I am ashamed because when I first heard of the killing of Ahmaud Arbery on the news back in February, I did not pay much attention to the story. The local news ran the story here because of our closeness to the city, but I don't live in Brunswick. I drive through Brunswick when traveling north on I-95. That's about it. I did not know Ahmaud Arbery or his family. 

I did not have the stereotypical thoughts about Arbery's killing when first hearing the story. Sadly, I just did not think much about the story at all. 

Perhaps I am guilty of being desensitized to stories of violence in our world. I pray this is not true, but the evidence reveals it may be.

I am a bit ashamed because I did not pray for this family at the time I first heard the story. 

Then, when I saw the video yesterday, I was ashamed that this happens in our nation (and just a short drive up the interstate) and it takes a video like this one to awaken many to the realities of such race-centered violence.

"Oh you're playing the race card, huh?" Nope. It's already been played and I addressed that earlier.

Convicted

Here's what I do know – I know I do not know what I can do. 

I really don't.

Yet, I am convicted as a Christian, a pastor, husband, father, and grandfather...that to do or say nothing is not an option.

This is not the time to debate theory.

It is not appropriate that only black pastors and leaders speak out.

In case you did not know, I do have mirrors in my home. Every time I pass by one I see my reflection. That means I know very well, as one of my good friends and church staff members, who also happens to be African-American jokingly told me once "You are very white." (It is a joke...and I am very white, so that's why we can laugh about it.) One of the challenges of being very white is not being able to fully understand what my brothers and sisters of color experience. 

I know that nothing will bring Ahmaud back.

I also know that responding to this apparent vigilante violence with more vigilante violence leaves everyone hurting, grieving, and many dead. So, that is not the answer.

But, to ignore this story (sadly, one that gets categorized as the latest in a long line of such) is not an answer either.

I encourage my Christian brothers and sisters to pray for each other, pray for the city of Brunswick, pray for the law enforcement officers, for the grand jury to be convened, for the ones who are shown on video to have killed the young man, for their families, and for the clear racial divide the remains in our nation to be eradicated by the grace and power of God.

This is bigger than the coronavirus pandemic, for this pandemic has been spreading for centuries. The only vaccine for this hateful, self-centered, race-dividing evil is God – not the white man's God, not the black man's God, not the brown man's God, not the Americanized God, not the politicized God...all these are man-made idols and truly should have a lower-case "g" in the name. The only cure for the darkest of sins is the redeemer and rescuer, Jesus Christ. May we declare him clearly, live for him wholly, and show our love for him as we love our brothers and sisters well.

One of my African-American pastor friends reminded me of a quote by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. These words should resonate at this time for all.

In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Church, we cannot be silent as the enemy continue to roar as a devouring lion in our midst.

Sinners act like sinners, but the children of God must stand together in these dark days. 


A Call To Prayer for Our SBC Seminaries

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted every aspect of our lives. I am reminded daily when I receive updates and prayer requests regarding the health challenges and hospitalizations of church members, the reported deaths of those in our communities and families, and the varied other challenges related to employment, education, and relational health. The list is extensive.

As a Southern Baptist pastor, I receive updates regularly from leaders in our local association, state convention, mission boards, and other denominational offices and entities. I appreciate the information and am thankful for the men and women serving the Lord and our churches in these offices and entities.

Our Seminaries

We have six excellent seminaries as Southern Baptists. These schools have served Southern Baptists well for many years. There have been challenges, changes, restructuring, and shifts throughout the years. Today we have six seminaries providing solid, biblical, doctrinally-sound guidance for men and women called of God into ministry. In addition to graduate level degrees, some offer undergraduate degrees in their respective colleges.

When COVID-19 forced most all schools to close and shift to online, distance-learning only, our seminaries made the proper adjustments. Yet, the challenges remain.

Dr. Albert Mohler, President of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (SBTS,) recently published an article delineating the changes made at SBTS in order to continue offering courses, degrees, and provide for staff and students. The changes were difficult and unexpected by many. Nevertheless, these are unexpected times (from a human perspective.) Click here for article.

It is my great concern for each of our seminaries at this time. While some see this as an opportune time to critique unnecessarily our seminaries and the men chosen to lead our institutions, I believe our needed and primary response as faithful believers and Southern Baptists is to pray for these men and the health of our schools.

These are our schools. 

Last Sunday (April 26, 2020) was a day on the denominational calendar emphasizing our Cooperative Program (CP.) I am so thankful for the CP and the faithful, generous giving Southern Baptists have historically shown.

As a graduate of two of our seminaries (Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary - 1993, and The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary - 2018) and pastor of a church with staff, church planters, and missionaries with degrees from each of our six seminaries, I am so thankful for the education provided and the resources available through CP.

Call to Prayer - Beginning Friday, May 1 at 11am EDT

Pastors praying for seminary presidents copy

Some will say "Who are you to call Southern Baptists to prayer?" Well...no one, really. Just a pastor believing that God desires we do this. Perhaps (and there's a really good possibility of this) he just wants me to pray for these men more intently. Nevertheless, I would like more to join me.

I have contacted the presidents of each of our seminaries and have asked individual local church pastors who are either graduates of each seminary or closely connected to join me on a Zoom call for a time of pastoral prayer for our seminaries and the presidents.

I will be premiering these prayer videos each weekday, beginning Friday, May 1, 2020 on our church's YouTube channel, Facebook page, and Twitter account. These clips will be shareable and I hope that many other Southern Baptists will join us in prayer each of these days for about fifteen minutes.

Why Do This?

Like others, I have been thinking about all the ways our church and others have been impacted by the pandemic. In the midst of this forced pause for many, I see God at work. I am not fearful. I am just praying for wisdom for decisions I must make as the pastor of the church and the leadership I must offer, as the under-shepherd of this flock. It can be overwhelming, especially if I slide into relying on my own ingenuity, ideas, and thoughts. 

In other words, I know I need wisdom and I cannot generate that. It is a gift from God. I know I lack wisdom in this area. I have never pastored during a pandemic (and neither has anyone else I know.)

If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask God, who gives generously to all without reproach, and it will be given him. - James 1:5 (ESV)

Thankfully, I know brothers and sisters who are praying for me. In addition to my request for wisdom, others are interceding as well. 

I know there are other denominational entities and conventions across the nation and world needing our prayers. I know there are other leaders needing prayer. We need to pray for them as well. This call to prayer is not meant to elevate one group over another. It is just that having one staff person set to graduate from Southeastern in May and others looking to move toward getting degrees in the future, our schools continue to come to my mind.

I truly enjoyed and benefited from my years in seminary and appreciate all who poured their lives into ensuring we have these schools and that they are worthy places to recommend others to attend.

When I reached out the seminary presidents, I explained that I was simply a local pastor desiring to initiate a time of prayer for them and the schools. I need wisdom in these days. I know they do as well. I asked local pastors to lead simply because I believe in the local church and know these pastors love these seminary presidents and seminaries and have blessed by them personally.

I also assured each pastor and president that the only agenda for these meetings was prayer. Nothing more. Nothing less. No critiques. No trolling disguised as prayer. No puffing up. No putting down. Just prayer for wisdom and encouragement. 

Everyone needs a Barnabas every now and then.

So, please share the schedule and join in prayer. If you cannot join at the time when the prayer videos premiere, join at a time that works for your schedule. 

I believe in the power of prayer. I also believe that for me, at least, I sometimes talk more about prayer than I actually pray. So, by scheduling these prayers, I will do more than just talk about prayer for these men, I will intercede on their behalf. I hope you will as well.

Prayer for our Seminaries & Presidents Schedule:

These prayer videos will premiere on the following days:

______________

This call to prayer is not something scheduled by any denominational entity. It is a grass-roots call to prayer for our men leading our seminaries. Praying for every staff member, student, and family connected to our seminaries. I am thankful for these men being willing to join me online for this time of intercession.