What the Pastor Is Expected and Obligated To Do

In most churches pastors are hired (called) and given a job description which lists expectations the congregation holds. Perhaps this is an example of current-era business practices and human resource strategies being "baptized" and brought into the church. I am not saying that is bad, but the job description (hopefully one centered on the biblical responsibilities and qualifications) often does not delineate the unspoken expectations of the pastor.

Those expectations are normally discovered by acts of omission (or perhaps commission.) 

We are beyond using the excuse "They didn't teach me that in seminary" in that pastor/shepherds do very many things not taught in seminary. Things that no class syllabus could lay out have occurred in every pastor's experience. 

For example, it may seem like no big deal to rearrange the furniture in a Sunday School class or to move a podium from one room to another where it could be better used, but when the pastor finds out that the podium was built by long-deceased Brother Buford and was meant to remain in his old classroom...a "special called business meeting" may be on the horizon.

Every pastor who has served for any significant length of time in a local church (whether an established church or a new plant) will have stories where he inadvertently crossed a line or stepped on a social landmine unawares.

There are  expectations that churches and Christians as individuals have for pastors that are truly biblical and should never be questioned, abdicated, or ignored. 

Preach the word; be ready in season and out of season; reprove, rebuke, and exhort, with complete patience and teaching.  - 2 Timothy 4:2 ESV

Pay careful attention to yourselves and to all the flock, in which the Holy Spirit has made you overseers, to care for the church of God, which he obtained with his own blood.  - Acts 20:28 ESV

And he gave the apostles, the prophets, the evangelists, the shepherds and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ.  - Ephesians 4:11-12 ESV

So I exhort the elders among you, as a fellow elder and a witness of the sufferings of Christ, as well as a partaker in the glory that is going to be revealed: shepherd the flock of God that is among you, exercising oversight, not under compulsion, but willingly, as God would have you; not for shameful gain, but eagerly; not domineering over those in your charge, but being examples to the flock. And when the chief Shepherd appears, you will receive the unfading crown of glory.  - 1 Peter 5:1-4 ESV

There are others, but the point is that Scripture speaks to the obligations, responsibilities, morality, and expectations of the one called out by God to serve as pastor in his local church.

Then, there are other expectations that are placed upon the pastor by well-intentioned church members. Not all expectations are bad. In fact, most could not be categorized as being unbiblical. There are many expectations that are little more than cultural or historical and while not actually spoken of or against in Scripture, if these items usurp the priority of prayer, Bible study, and preaching the Word well (allowing time for study) then the church could actually be piling on responsibilities designed not by God, but by others, that will actually harm the ministry by keeping the pastor tired, perpetually dissatisfied, absent from his family, and unprepared for the primacy of the role.

Hospital Visitation

For example, while visiting the sick in hospitals or those in nursing homes is not mentioned as a pastoral responsibility in those terms in the Bible, it is often the right thing to do (pending COVID restrictions.) It is actually the right thing to do for all Christians and not just a pastoral responsibility.

Counseling

Offering counseling is another good thing. It is even a biblical thing, but not the primary thing pastors must do.

Community Events

Being visible in the community at local gatherings, club meetings, prayer breakfasts, golf tournaments, board meetings, etc. are not necessarily bad, but if done in order to elevate self (or to elevate one's pastor) or to create some form of small-pond celebrity status...then, well, it is bad and likely sinful. They can also overwhelm a pastor's schedule keeping him from the primary call, by creating a full calendar of events that have nothing to do with the church or the call. 

Funerals

Preaching at funerals is expected by church members, though not a mandate in scripture. In fact, this has become a very important part of my ministry. As I serve the Lord in a church with many aging members, funerals have become far more regular on my schedule than I desire. Yet, these moments of gathering with family and friends, remembering a recently passed loved one, celebrating God's grace and mercy, and proclaiming the truth of the gospel allows for these moments that always interrupt our schedules to become holy pauses where God is glorified and the truth is declared.

Weddings

Then, there are weddings. I have had the honor of officiating many weddings over the years. Each one has been unique and each has presented a new set of questions to answer.

While much talk in Christian circles is about the fallout related to the Obergefell decision of the US Supreme Court a few years back making same-sex unions legal, I won't address the intricacies of that here as I have written about it previously. However, in case it is not known, I do not agree with the Supreme Court decision and I hold to the biblical definition of marriage being only between one man (born a man) to one woman (born a woman) for life in a covenant relationship.

I have been part of many Christian weddings where God was honored clearly and the worship experience truly occurred. They have been memorable, joyous, holy occasions.

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Nevertheless, some "Christian" weddings have shifted from being a ceremony where God was worshipped, where the union of man and woman was clearly expressed as an illustration of Christ and his church, and the crowd walked away knowing they had experienced holy matrimony (with an emphasis on holy) to being little more than an event designed to be remembered for the dress of the wedding party, the  venue, decorations, theme, Instagram hashtag, and the post-ceremony antics.

Weddings are Big Business

It is clear from "Say Yes to the Dress" to the renovations of old barns and farms into destination wedding venues, and even the influence of so-called reality shows such as "The Bachelor" and every "I married someone I just met..." show on TLC, that weddings have become big business. The show becomes more important than the vows for some and amazingly many are left scratching their heads when the shine has worn off and they realize they put far more energy and money into the wedding than the marriage.

It is painful to watch.

It is more painful as a pastor to know that at some level I may have allowed this to occur by ignoring the guidelines for marriage and steps needed to help a bride and groom wisely prepare and plan for their wedding and ultimately marriage.

Church members have expectations and they just presume that the pastor will officiate their child or grandchild's wedding, or maybe even their own wedding simply because he is the pastor and that is what he is supposed to do.

Over the years, I have made numerous mistakes when it comes to weddings. I have stood as the pastor, God's ambassador, calling a man and woman into holy matrimony, without preparing them for what the ceremony means and what is to come. Sometimes, I have done so because I knew this was my expected role. Other times, it was because I knew the people getting married and called them friends. 

Often guidelines are written to help keep future mistakes from being made. Therefore, we have set up some guidelines that provide guardrails for our pastors and ministers on staff. In fact, it gives them permission to say "NO" to a couple when they have been asked to officiate such a ceremony in order to provide a larger "YES" to helping them walk into a godly, biblical marriage.

Pre-marital counseling is a must and we utilize the "Saving Your Marriage Before It Starts" material by Drs. Les and Leslie Parrott. There are many other quality pre-marital counseling resources available and each pastor must deem what works best for him and the couple. The key is to ensure it is not rushed and serious evaluation and discussion occurs, always going back to God's role for husband and wife and his blessing upon the union. 

When do we say NO to weddings?

Well, this list is not in order of importance or all encompassing, but does provide some basics for our church's pastors when it comes to weddings. There could be lists for every segment above, but the wedding issue continues to be one that must be addressed, so here is a sampling of when we say "no":

  • When either bride or groom is a believer seeking to marry a non-believer. 
  • When the bride or groom have never attended the church, or any church.
  • When the bride or groom used to attend but haven't been active in years and just want the pastor or venue for the ceremony because "that's expected."
  • When neither the bride or groom is a believer. There really is no need to have a Christian wedding for non-Christians, though the opportunity to share the gospel must not be ignored.
  • When another pastor at the church the couple actually attends refused to officiate their wedding due to some biblical offense and the couple is only seeking some other pastor to fill the spot.
  • When the couple refuses to participate in multi-session pre-marital counseling.
  • When elements of the service actually make a mockery of God and his design (for instance, I refused a ceremony where the bride was going to wear a tuxedo and the groom was going to wear a dress because they thought it was "funny.")
  • When a couple is living together out of wedlock. There may be cases where the individuals are unbelievers who both recently surrendered their lives to Christ and allowances (temporary separation, quick counsel and private ceremony, etc.) are made. In these cases, the God-honoring aspects are clear. Yet, there are also cases where long-time church members/attenders just ignore these guidelines, move in together (the line is often "for financial reasons") and basically expect the pastor/minister to ignore the facts before him. 
  • When adultery has clearly occurred and repentance is absent.
  • When either the bride or groom is already married. Just wanted to clarify that for the fans of "Sister Wives."
  • For me...when I am not available. The truth is, I am most often available and while I may shift things at the last minute to speak at a funeral for a dear saint, I will not shift to accommodate a ceremony that just happens to be in the middle of a much needed vacation or other trip.

Grace Abounds

It should be noted that while we have these items that lead us to say "NO" that it is not a joy to say no to a couple. The hope is that this man and woman in love would be open to honest, heart-felt, biblical conversations with one of our pastors about the gospel, God's design for marriage, and how to honor him. Grace abounds and this must not be ignored. The wedding planning may just be a gospel conversation moment and should not be brushed off. The end result is that at times, "no" is still the answer from the pastor, but it is not to be offered as a legalistic response (there's no joy in being mean) but as a plea for holiness and trusting God.

Be Steadfast, Pastor

Pastor, there are always expectations placed upon you that seem to lie outside the job description. When you say "no" to a church member who has clear expectations for your presence, performance, or approval, you had best have a bigger "yes" ready. We don't say "no" just for the fun of it. The "no" is meant to drive people to a deeper, biblical "yes" and that is part of shepherding well. 

The wise shepherd will lead his sheep, but may have to yell "no" at them at times in order to protect them and guide them to safety and abundance.

Everyone has expectations of everyone else. Look to the Word first and hold fast to your calling. For the church member, do the same and pray for your pastor as he seeks to lead wisely and well. And...give him a break if he says no to officiating your kids' wedding or can't visit your neighbor's aunt in the hospital every week.


Christians, the Presidential Election, and Political Idolatry (Or...What Now That This Election Is Over?)

There are phrases that we say because we know we are supposed to say them.

These words give an appearance of understanding, right thinking, and maturity.

For instance, in an election year such as we have experience, phrases from Christians such as “God is in control” and “God is sovereign” have been stated, tweeted, shared, and expressed loudly. Additionally, there has been much said regarding the need for unity among Christians (especially Christians who actually attend the same church or are part of the same denomination.) While I hold that words matter, sometimes, they are sadly, apparently, just…words. Empty words.

This is proving to be true now in that many of the very same evangelicals who declared for weeks with confidence that God is King of kings, Lord of lords, remains on his throne, is never taken by surprise, and is in total control of this universe he created has somehow been defrauded, sidetracked, left behind, or mistaken.

Words Matter...Sometimes

In other words, “God is sovereign, except in this area of politics…apparently.”

Or maybe, “God is in control…except when things don’t happen the way I want.”

The Longest Tuesday

Last week was Tuesday. I mean it seems that the entire week was Tuesday. Election Day in the United States was supposed to be, as has been the case for years, the first Tuesday of November. Yet, and we all knew this would happen, the votes did not come in for all in a timely manner. There were varied allowances in certain states regarding mail-in ballots that has created a predicted conundrum (and for some a “conspiracy” comparable to what some consider LBJ’s 1948 fraudulent Senate run and the Chicago 1960 voting debacle.) Yet, on Saturday the Associated Press (as they have done since the 1840s) called the race for president for Joe Biden. As President-Elect, Biden has held speeches, press conferences, and put out statements regarding an agenda his administration will do.

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All the while President Trump and his spokespersons are refusing to concede, awaiting for answers regarding some filed lawsuits and questions hovering over vote counts and electoral college numbers.

So, what is the Christian to do?

What can we do?

Perhaps we could check back to some of the statements believers like us were making earlier in the year. Maybe revisit things like “God is in control” and “God is sovereign.”

Maybe.

That would be a good start.

In fact, it would be a great place to remain.

The marriage of evangelicalism and partisan politics has resulted in a strange mutation that actually elevates self while ignoring biblical Christianity. Whether red, blue, or somewhere in between, this is nothing more than idolatry. On one side biblically sound Christians have buddied up to prosperity hucksters and have harmed the church’s witness. On the other, some have willingly partnered with the culture of death and the moral revolutionaries to the elimination of a sound biblical witness. Sadly, churches found their membership divided, some choosing to walk away from their faith family over the rift. I fear we may suffer repercussions to our Christian witness for years.

Yet, knowing that words matter, I desire to lean into the aforementioned phrase that “God is in control” knowing that he was not surprised by the result of the election (or the coming result if anything is to change.) The mission of the church has not changed at all. The Great Commission was not revised. The Great Commandment was not amended. The gospel of grace has not been updated. God is the same yesterday, today, and forever.

As for the idolators in our midst, rather than throw the stones at the easily identified ones who have sacrificed their witness on the altar of political power, I will look in the mirror. I realize that “there, but for the grace of God go I.” For this I confess. In fact, we all should. Whenever we place our trust in anything or anyone other than Christ, regardless how “Christian” it may be wrapped, it is still a form of idolatry.

Thank God he is sovereign, in control, gracious, and holy.

Thank God.


The Results Have Been Tallied. We Have Our Answer!

It's true. After a long night of watching prognosticators, spinmeisters, analysts, and pundits explain maps, coloring within the lines either red or blue, flip-flops on what things mean, frustrations, celebrations, and all that comes with this season...WE HAVE THE ANSWER!

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Photo credit: Joe Shlabotnik on VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NC-SA


I know it's been a long year. People have been talking (behind face masks) about how everyone else should respond. Families have had arguments. Churches have even had divisions over this. Funds have been given to those who agree with the giver. Funds have been withheld from those who who disagree. Specialty advertising companies have raked in much, plastering names and logos on signs, stickers, banners, and any other items that can be branded.

People have stood in long lines. 

The postal service has worked overtime.

Civic duties have been fulfilled.

And now...thank God...WE HAVE THE ANSWER!

Today, this Wednesday after election day in our nation, it is clear. In fact, it is as clear today as it was yesterday and the days before. Amazingly, the answer has nothing to do with our nation.

The answer we have, the one many have been waiting to hear, is clear. And, we should be declaring it loudly today, with joy, with smiles on our faces, as victors.

Jesus Christ is still Lord.

He is still the Way.

He is still the Truth.

He is still the Life.

He is the answer. 

In this reality, his church, his children may rest. There are no doubts in God's sovereignty. Christians boldly may walk in him, trusting that the throne is not vacant, believing that the promises of the gospel are not watered-down. We have hope. We have lenses in our glasses that are so much better than those handed out by the political parties in our nation. Our worldview is not red, is not blue, is not green, or any other partisan color scheme. Our worldview is biblical and through the lens of Scripture we may see as God sees.

Love God well. Love people truly. Love people enough to introduce them to God.

Rest easy church.

We have the answer.


What Are Parents To Do When Their Teenager Stands Alone?

Three years ago we  began making the very strategic shift in our church from a simple age-grade programmatic model to an equipping model. This model is focused on equipping disciples within families with an emphasis on making disciples who make disciples (within the home.)

I have written on this before. One of the warnings for any church making the shift is the inevitable loss of families, members, and attenders who just do not understand the shift or plainly do not like the focus. In other words - count the cost. (I have written about this here.)

Often when there is such a shift in ministerial philosophy within a church, the real results of effectiveness are not known until months or even years later. Earlier today, I received this email from a church member with a teenage daughter. While the subject is a specific issue the daughter was facing in school, the celebration shared was that home-based discipleship with intentional family worship has led to the response celebrated by both mom and dad. I celebrate alongside them as God is glorified in this. 

Here's their story, with names removed...

It is 9:30pm on a Wednesday. Lunches are made. Homework is completed. Chores are finished—only to begin again in a few short hours. You gather the family together for a short nightly devotional and prayer. And then it hits you out of nowhere. That unseen spiritual attack at the moment when you are exhausted and weak, simply seeking refuge and rest. Putting away her studies and work for the day my daughter informs us that she is struggling with a school assignment and not because of its level of difficulty but its content. We pull up the assigned short story and are immediately shocked. The story is not even borderline pushing the limits—it is graphic. Not knowing who is reading this, I will not even give the author or title so as to not glorify what is basically soft-core pornography, nor do I want to put in the eyes of others what should never have seen the light of day. It is not art. It is not literature—and my wife and I are both language arts majors and educators. We taught Shakespeare with all of his innuendo. We taught Twain and Lee and the controversial language and race issues. We understand the dangers of censorship and are firm supporters of the First Amendment. However, this is in-your-face sex and violence and it has been put into my 15-year-old daughter’s eyes and the eyes of hundreds other young people. In just a few hours she will be told to continue reading the story and provide written answers to in-depth questions about its content.

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How do you respond? What do you do as a parent? As a student? Immediately we run the gamut of human emotion and response. Anger. How could this teacher think this was even remotely appropriate? We will be at the school to meet with the principal first thing in the morning. Frustration. Who approved this assignment? In a world that greatly struggles with domestic and sexual violence, why are our public schools increasingly pushing and glorifying it? Sadness. Why can’t our kids just go to school and be kids? At younger and younger ages our children seem to be bombarded with heavier and darker topics hidden under the guise of liberal arts education. Fear. If we speak out, will my daughter become the target of harassment and retaliation? Confusion. Maybe we are just overreacting. Is it really that big of a deal? Spiritual warfare at 9:30pm on a school night.

Surely other parents will be outraged, too? We put the kids to bed with instructions to pray for wisdom and then begin to discuss and reach out. It is late and we are met with this response and thought: It is not a big deal. The Bible is graphic. This is just a similar description of what was occurring inside and outside the Gates of Hell. We can’t put our kids in bubbles. We begin to waver. Yet this seems different. While the Bible does sometimes graphically describe man’s wicked deeds and ways, it is always presented as sin--man’s depravity pointing the way to the need of a Savior. Sin is never glorified. It is presented as exactly what it is: deadly and destructive. The story that my daughter read portrays it as pleasurable and life-giving. It is a lie being presented as truth. This is a big deal. It is an attempt to isolate, indoctrinate, assimilate, and confuse my daughter and others. As Christians we are called to be many things—light, salt, ambassadors. We are “beggars pointing other beggars to the Bread.” We are called to be set apart and stand for the “Way, the Truth, and the Life.” Augustine is to have once written, “Sometimes we must stand against the world for the good of the world.”

We end our evening with prayer—heartfelt and intimate. Our daughter may very well have to stand “alone” and it may come with a cost. The next morning, we instruct her that we stand with her if she is led to stand and refuse to complete the assignment. We assure her from Romans 8:1-2: “There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. For the law of the Spirit of life has set you free in Christ Jesus from the law of sin and death.”

God knows her heart and we love her—no strings attached. I kiss her cheek and then watch her walk out the door with her older brother into the darkness of an early morning.

My heart is heavy and my wife and I begin to pray over her. Then come the texts. None of her friends will stand with her. She will be standing “alone.” She is afraid and is just going to do the assignment.

I get this at 7:06am: “I don’t know what to do.”

Those two voices: the Lord gently affirming her faithfulness and the world screaming for her conformity. We feel helpless. We want to rush to the school and fight for her. This is why families matter. This is why churches must equip families no matter their structure. Because when faith and life intersect, when spiritual attacks happen late on school nights, we must be prepared.

I text her back: “It is okay. Either way God loves you. He KNOWS your heart and He knows you are for Him. We love you. You do what God leads you to do. You are NOT alone!”

Fifteen long minutes go by and then we receive a picture of the assignment with her handwritten response:

Ms.______, I mean this in the most polite way possible but I cannot do this assignment. I think you are a fantastic teacher but this story goes against my morals and values. Some parts of this story are so straightforward and disgusting that I don’t feel okay reading it. Jesus died for us so I think I should not entertain what He died for. So I will take a zero for this or I would be happy to do another assignment. Thank you.

Tears well in my eyes. I am proud but I know this did not come from me or her mother. Paul continues in Romans 12:1-2: “Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship. Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—his good, pleasing and perfect will.”

Her Father in Heaven taught her well and she was ready for this test. As of this writing we have not received the teacher’s response but I know this: no matter the outcome my daughter has taught me something. She was not “ashamed of the testimony about our Lord” and displayed “a spirit not of fear but of power and love and self-control.” (1 Timothy 1:7-8) While my first response was to fight in my power, she showed reliance on the Lord and His wisdom. She stood firm, responded in love, and glorified our Lord.

Families, Trevin Wax writes...

“In every age, the world implements strategies of isolation, indoctrination, assimilation, and confusion, and in every age, the church must resist with confidence and courage, trusting that our faithfulness will be a gift to the nations we know will one day bow before the world’s true King.” (article on TGC here.)

Begin today to prepare your children for the spiritual battles that lie ahead. Fight the temptation to isolate them or fight for them. There may be a time for that but be led by the Spirit through prayer and Godly wisdom. When your faith and life intersect, when spiritual attacks happen at 9:30pm on a school night, what will your children learn about your walk with Christ?

Sometimes you just need a reminder from God that the effort you are exerting to help parents be equipped to equip their children is worth it. Sometimes, as parents and guardians of children and teenagers, you just need a moment where God reveals the effort is making a difference.

Disciples making disciples–it's not a new idea. It just sometimes gets ignored or forgotten in our celebrity-focused, consumer-centered, attractional, event-oriented versions of church. But don't lose heart, equipping the saints (even those within our homes) is worth it. Better yet, through the Holy Spirit, we are empowered to do so.


The Pastor's Kid Responds to "The Pastor's Kid" and Other Stuff (Guest Post by Ashley O'Brien)

Ashley (Tarkington) O'Brien has read the book The Pastor's Kid:What It's Like and How to Help by Barnabas Piper and as a pastor's kid (my kid) she has written this review of, or rather a response to, his book. Yet, this is more than a book review, it is a wise discourse from one who grew up in the fishbowl known as the "pastor's family" and her perspective of how this impacted her view of God and the church. 

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I recently read the book The Pastor’s Kid: What It's Like and How to Help by Barnabas Piper. Barnabas Piper is the son of Pastor John Piper, known by many as the 33-year pastor at Bethlehem Baptist Church in Minneapolis, founder of Desiring God ministries, author of numerous books, speaker at Passion Conferences and more. I initially saw the book advertised on my social media pages (apparently my pages know the occupation of my father...that's scary.)

I was interested on Barnabas’ perspective as a pastor's kid (for obvious reasons) and what he had to say.  I enjoyed the book and could relate to Piper's stories and understood how some would struggle under the identity of their father's title. I could also see how some would be benefited by the role as well. I talked to my brother about our experiences growing up in a pastor's home, just to get his perspective. We grew up in the same God-honoring home, were active in the same church and ministries, had many of the same influences in the church, but as teenagers and adults diverged into the two most common and opposite stereotypes of a being a "Pastor’s Kid" or "PK."

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This is not a picture of Ashley, but these look like church kids.

As my brother and I discussed points highlighted in the book, we concluded that our dad’s occupation and position as pastor of the church had little to do with how we were raised. What I mean is that we were not raised to be good PKs, but were raised to know the Lord, know about him, to love God, love people, love God's church, and become his disciples. We "grew up in church" as did many others, and were loved, taught, and prayed for by many in our church family. My brother and I concluded that none of those things would have changed if dad were not the pastor. In other words, we determined that our family simply was seeking to be authentic Christians and our upbringing was not any more Christian just because our dad stood on the stage and preached each Sunday. 

We agreed that due to dad’s position we were able to experience places and people that we would not have otherwise. So, we selfishly are thankful for that. Nevertheless, a negative aspect of being a PK would be the expectations placed on us by others. This is understandable, but a bit frustrating. Adults have expectations of children and teenagers, especially related to behavior. For any church kid, there are expectations and since the church is supposed to be family, there comes a collective expectation from "family" members and a heightened level of responsibility. 

Based on Piper's book, the concerns and issues experienced by a PK can actually be valid for any person who grew up with a church family. This is not a bad thing. It is just a reality. 

To the person who grew up in church and abandoned church upon entering adulthood, there are many reasons as to why that exit occurred. Statements like “That's my parent's faith. It's just not for me" or other similar reasons (excuses) are common.

Growing Up Is Inevitable

At some point, the church kid (not just the PK) grows up. It's unavoidable. The church kid has to graduate from the kids' ministry (or at least they should) and move up to the next level of age-graded ministry. Maybe this was the shift to the “cool” youth group (at least "cool" as it pertains to church youth groups.) In some churches this means gathering in a separate room designed by concerned adults seeking to create place where teenagers would feel welcome. Maybe it included the designated seats in big church where teenagers would sit together, rather than sitting with their parents. It is a rite of passage of sorts. Then comes the next step into "big" church–high school graduation. For the few who remain in the church, moving from the youth room with all the smoke machines, old couches, broken ping pong tables, loud praise music, pizzas, and games to the "boring big church" services is required. It is here that the music volume decreased, many people seemed disengaged, most didn't sing along with the music, and the music was not new or cutting edge (or at least it seemed the songs were strange versions of those performed by the youth band.) Church was now boring, it seemed. It was no longer fun. Gone was the weekly social hour where you could gather with friends during the middle of the week. No one was making you attend any longer. Friends moved away to college. Some stopped attending after receiving their free gift from the church during the high school graduation recognition. In fact, for many, that was the last time some former members of the youth group (at least some of them) were seen at church.  And you are tempted to walk away as well. Perhaps using the old excuse of “I am not being fed," but deep down knowing you just do not want to be fed what they are feeding you. You had rededicated your life to Christ many times, especially at youth camp, but now...church just isn't the same.

This isn't the biography of PKs only. There are many kids who grew up in the church who can relate because this is their story as well, whether they were a PK, a deacon's kid, a committee member's kid, or just a kid who went to church a lot.

We collectively nod our heads in agreement and think of all those fond memories of our childhood and teenage years. As adults, some of us become frustrated with the church. Some shop around for new churches, always seeking the newest experience (while actually being driven by an overwhelming sense of nostalgia resulting in a search for a Sunday experience that is basically an updated version of the youth worship at camps from years prior or the mid-week student gatherings of our high school years.)

Though I loved all the camps, mission trips, and pizza nights, I believe we may have unwittingly done a disservice over time. We created silos of ministry and rarely if ever integrated generationally. This led to an easy exit for active attenders upon high school graduation. Certainly, the individual has a choice. We cannot force anyone to remain in the church, but we must not put all the blame on the individual if the church as a whole never intentionally connected church family members beyond those of the same age or demographic. 

While Piper's book is focused mainly on his experiences as a pastor’s kid, it can easily relate to everyone who grew up as a church kid. 

Jeremy Noel is quoted in the book stating...

“Finding God was the greatest challenge. Being raised in an atmosphere where God was ministry, vocation and hobby makes it hard to be amazed by the gospel. Being raised where life is always about showing God to a group makes it hard to see God individually.”

At some point, the child has to own it. The now adult, former "church kid" must own their decisions and their relationship (or lack of relationship) with Christ and his church. Take responsibility. Noel's quote is real and reveals authentic challenges. It also explains why so many leave the church after high school. We can blame parents, teachers, and preachers…but, at the end of the day, when the now adult does not take ownership for his or her relationship with Christ, it falls on them. Children have to grow up. There is a needed graduation from the “fun” church and the “feed me” church that is built upon a consumer mentality.  

Barnabas Piper stated well...

“PKs (church kids) despite all these struggles cannot wallow in and bemoan them. Rather, we must own what responsibilities are ours; to honor Jesus, to honor our fathers and mothers, to love and support the church, and to go about our lives not as victims but as the redeemed. Grace is here for us all!” 

For the Pastors

To the pastors–love your children. Be willing to listen. Be a parent first, not always their pastor. Cheer for them at ball games (but remember who you represent so maybe don’t yell so much at the referee.) Don’t elevate your children in a way that they believe they are better than their church peers. They are surely the most important to you, but no one wants some little snot (sorry - I'm venting a bit) saying to his or her Bible study teacher “But don’t you know who my dad is?”

None of this may stir up issues for you or them initially, but it could be harmful in the long run. It can impact how your children view church and Christ. It will affect how they function as a teenager and adult when you are not there to tell them the right church answers or force them to be at church with you. Those outside the church do not care that their dad was a pastor (or they may have some unfair preconceived ideas about what that means.) Just remember that your children did not choose to be the child of a pastor or to be in the spotlight (even if it's just the spotlight of a local church.) They do not typically enjoy being illustrations in your sermon. Be sure to have a genuine conversation with your children about his or her decision to be a Christ follower. Do not doubt, of course, but understand that this decision could have been easily made due to the pressure and assumption that they should be a Christian simply because you are the pastor. Help your children make the decision to surrender to Christ as Lord their own, and not yours. Remember, God has no grandchildren. Be real with your children. If your child never sees you struggle or knows that you doubt at times, then they will feel as if they are not allowed to either. Allowing them to wrestle with their salvation or relationship with Christ and his church is healthy and all believers experience this. Offer up transparency and allow your children to ask you the hard questions so they may view their relationship with Christ and his church more real and their own. When their dad is supposed to be the “super-Christian” it is tough to be raw and real, especially when they feel they do not measure up.

For the PK

PKs–understand that your identity is not founded on what your father or mother do for a living. It is not what you excel at or how you look. As a child of God, your identity is solely found in Christ. The sooner you realize that, the sooner you will feel free from others expectations. Standing strong in Christ and his church and growing up to be a bold follower of Christ is truly what your Christian parents desire. God gave you the parents you were intended to have for a reason. So, appreciate them and love them, it is not easy being a pastor. It's not easy being a pastor's wife. And, we know, it's not easy being a pastor's kid either. But...who said this was supposed to be easy? That's just one reason we can rely on God and his grace. 


What the Church Must Do If Trump Wins the Presidency

It’s a presidential election year. The two major US political parties have just completed their respective conventions. However, the conventions this year were much different than those in the past. Thanks to COVID-19, the typical scenes of convention centers filled with hundreds wearing red, white, and blue ribbons, buttons, and the ever-popular, Styrofoam barber shop quartet hats (why are these still a thing?) cheering on their respective candidates was replaced with socially-distanced (for the most part,) online speeches, cheers (or boos) on social media, and more sound bites than in recent history.

Some have stated that now, more than ever, our nation is polarized. Perhaps, but as I have said before, we as Americans have faced polarization before. In fact, other than just a few times since 1776, we have experienced division more often than unity. Whether you hold to the narrative that the United States was created as a Christian nation, or simply a nation launched with a foundation of historic Judeo-Christian principles, God’s church and his children have played significant roles in the history and makeup of our nation.

This must continue to be the case.

November Is Coming, Regardless If We Are Ready

By November 4, 2020, the world will know (well, unless there is a recount or some other strange occurrence – it is 2020, so who knows?) whether Donald Trump or Joseph Biden will stand in front of the US Capitol Building, hand on Bible, taking the oath as the President of the United States. When this election is over, only those with a Pollyanna view of the world believe that everyone will accept the results maturely, peacefully, and with a bright outlook toward the future. Regardless who wins, it is likely that protests and demonstrations will occur, accusations of fraud will be leveled, and at least half the nation will lament with sackcloth and ashes while the other half celebrates.

Trump pence
Photo credit: VisualHunt / CC BY-NC-SA

Many Christians cannot fathom that other Christians (I use the term “Christian” not as a political designation or social designation, but as an authentic title for those who have surrendered their lives to Jesus Christ as Lord, have been redeemed by Christ’s blood, will be in heaven when they die, and are faithful to live biblically as covenant members of a local church) will have actually voted for their opposition candidate, a third-party candidate, or have left that block blank on the ballot. Yet, it will happen. It always does. Christians who voted one way will declare that those who voted differently to be heretics, unbelievers, and a variety of other things other than true Christians.

Issues matter. They matter immensely. Seeing the world from a biblical worldview is challenging, even for the long-time mature Christian. It is a continual challenge and each Christian must weigh issues, actions, news reports, speeches, political promises, and more from a biblical perspective. I’ll be honest, this is more difficult at times than putting together a 1,000 piece jigsaw puzzle with all the pieces upside down and no box lid to use as a guide.

Yet, we must.

Each election cycle, there are Christians who grieve the state of our nation when their desired candidate did not win the presidency. The feelings are not limited to national elections and opinions may even be stronger in the local contests.

Other than the one US President who won the election unanimously, our nation has always experienced post-election blues for a significant number or people.

What Must the Church Do If Trump Is Elected?

We must pray. We must pray for the President, his family, his Cabinet, and all who serve alongside him. Pray for God’s will to be done. Pray for the person to come to a personal saving knowledge of Christ. Pray.

I remember one local National Day of Prayer focus many years ago when a man I know was organizing which leader would pray for each designated person or group (President, Congress, Supreme Court, state leaders, etc.) He said to me, “I cannot pray for the President.” I was shocked. I asked why and he responded that he did not like the man and could not pray for him. At that moment, I realized this National Day of Prayer event was a waste. Why? Because the prayers were only for the liked, and not for the ones God had placed, by his divine plan, in the positions of authority.

I remember one person I met who came to church wearing black after the election that did not go as she desired. She stated she would wear black as a sign of mourning until we had a new President. I think the public mourning lasted about a week, or until all the black clothes were in the laundry.

Praying for someone is not an affirmation of everything that person says or does. Praying for our leaders, as Christians, is not something the church should vote upon. In fact, it should be our natural response as Christ-followers, regardless who is in leadership.

First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people, for kings and all who are in high positions, that we may lead a peaceful and quiet life, godly and dignified in every way. – 1 Timothy 2:1-2 (ESV)

We also must pray for our nation, for whomever sits in the seat of executive power wields great influence and has much power, even in our system of checks and balances. The President influences by executive order, through the appointments of judicial officers, and by the signing of bills provided by the Congress. These are decisions and actions that will not only affect each citizen currently alive, but those yet to be born for years to come.

Prayer is not passive. It is an active response and in truth, a preemptive strike on evil and sin.

So pray for the President...even if you didn't vote for him and do not personally like him or his policies.

We must proclaim truth. Within our great experimental republic, we have not only the right, but the expectation to be Christ’s church in the public square. Whether it is speaking out against issues or laws that denigrate or eliminate life when deemed inconvenient, or items that perpetuate systemic practices that keep one people group at bay while another experiences more freedoms, Christians must be united biblically for the sake of the gospel and for the glory of God.

Speaking against atrocities must be preceded by speaking truth. The gospel is not meant to be kept secret and though the world may ignore, get angry, accuse, and push Christians aside, we must realize that our calling requires us, in love, to not remain silent.

Speaking truth means having the courage to speak when pressure is great, potential fallout is real, and when it pushes against the political narrative of the party in power (even if it is your declared party.) Remember, our allegiance is first to the Lord.

We must participate. What if Christians were united with each other as brothers and sisters in Christ rather than simply upon a designated political issue? What if participation as Christ’s church meant that believers actually sought unity that is provided in Christ? Unity in Christ will not occur naturally. We will not drift toward this. We must be active participants, as individuals and as local churches, for God’s sake, regardless who is in the White House.

Some say that there is too much water under the bridge, too many historic errors done in the name of the church, that we are too far gone. Yet, I go to Christ’s prayer in the Gospel of John and recognize that since then, he has been interceding on behalf of you and me.

“I do not ask for these only, but also for those who will believe in me through their word, that they may all be one, just as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be in us, so that the world may believe that you have sent me. The glory that you have given me I have given to them, that they may be one even as we are one, I in them and you in me, that they may become perfectly one, so that the world may know that you sent me and loved them even as you loved me.” – John 17:20-23 ESV

Apparently, Christ believes that we truly can be one in him.

So, after this election (and I would say, let’s not wait) the calling for Christ’s church is to remember that we are placed here as light in the darkness, to point others toward the One who is the Way, Truth, and Life. If we’re not careful, we may forget in the midst of political machinations, coronavirus updates, and daily reminders of protests, demonstrations, lawlessness, and death, that Christ is our King. He reigns supremely.

The winner in November will not change that.

So, pray, proclaim, and participate in unity for the sake of the gospel.

Our faith must solely be in the King of kings, Lord of lords. Christ alone. Living as citizens of His kingdom first must guide how we live here, and how we respond when everything does not go the way we desire.

By the way – I have posted this article twice, once with Trump in the title. Once with Biden. The articles are identical other than that. Why? Because I know some may read it based on who is listed in the title, but I believe the church’s response remains consistent regardless who wins.


What the Church Must Do If Biden Wins the Presidency

It’s a presidential election year. The two major US political parties have just completed their respective conventions. However, the conventions this year were much different than those in the past. Thanks to COVID-19, the typical scenes of convention centers filled with hundreds wearing red, white, and blue ribbons, buttons, and the ever-popular, Styrofoam barber shop quartet hats (why are these still a thing?) cheering on their respective candidates was replaced with socially-distanced (for the most part,) online speeches, cheers (or boos) on social media, and more sound bites than in recent history.

Some have stated that now, more than ever, our nation is polarized. Perhaps, but as I have said before, we as Americans have faced polarization before. In fact, other than just a few times since 1776, we have experienced division more often than unity. Whether you hold to the narrative that the United States was created as a Christian nation, or simply a nation launched with a foundation of historic Judeo-Christian principles, God’s church and his children have played significant roles in the history and makeup of our nation.

This must continue to be the case.

November Is Coming, Regardless If We Are Ready

By November 4, 2020, the world will know (well, unless there is a recount or some other strange occurrence – it is 2020, so who knows?) whether Donald Trump or Joseph Biden will stand in front of the US Capitol Building, hand on Bible, taking the oath as the President of the United States. When this election is over, only those with a Pollyanna view of the world believe that everyone will accept the results maturely, peacefully, and with a bright outlook toward the future. Regardless who wins, it is likely that protests and demonstrations will occur, accusations of fraud will be leveled, and at least half the nation will lament with sackcloth and ashes while the other half celebrates.

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Photo credit: Biden For President on VisualHunt / CC BY-NC-SA

Many Christians cannot fathom that other Christians (I use the term “Christian” not as a political designation or social designation, but as an authentic title for those who have surrendered their lives to Jesus Christ as Lord, have been redeemed by Christ’s blood, will be in heaven when they die, and are faithful to live biblically as covenant members of a local church) will have actually voted for their opposition candidate, a third-party candidate, or have left that block blank on the ballot. Yet, it will happen. It always does. Christians who voted one way will declare that those who voted differently to be heretics, unbelievers, and a variety of other things other than true Christians.

Issues matter. They matter immensely. Seeing the world from a biblical worldview is challenging, even for the long-time mature Christian. It is a continual challenge and each Christian must weigh issues, actions, news reports, speeches, political promises, and more from a biblical perspective. I’ll be honest, this is more difficult at times than putting together a 1,000 piece jigsaw puzzle with all the pieces upside down and no box lid to use as a guide.

Yet, we must.

Each election cycle, there are Christians who grieve the state of our nation when their desired candidate did not win the presidency. The feelings are not limited to national elections and opinions may even be stronger in the local contests.

Other than the one US President who won the election unanimously, our nation has always experienced post-election blues for a significant number or people.

What Must the Church Do If Biden Is Elected?

We must pray. We must pray for the President, his family, his Cabinet, and all who serve alongside him. Pray for God’s will to be done. Pray for the person to come to a personal saving knowledge of Christ. Pray.

I remember one local National Day of Prayer focus many years ago when a man I know was organizing which leader would pray for each designated person or group (President, Congress, Supreme Court, state leaders, etc.) He said to me, “I cannot pray for the President.” I was shocked. I asked why and he responded that he did not like the man and could not pray for him. At that moment, I realized this National Day of Prayer event was a waste. Why? Because the prayers were only for the liked, and not for the ones God had placed, by his divine plan, in the positions of authority.

I remember one person I met who came to church wearing black after the election that did not go as she desired. She stated she would wear black as a sign of mourning until we had a new President. I think the public mourning lasted about a week, or until all the black clothes were in the laundry.

Praying for someone is not an affirmation of everything that person says or does. Praying for our leaders, as Christians, is not something the church should vote upon. In fact, it should be our natural response as Christ-followers, regardless who is in leadership.

First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people, for kings and all who are in high positions, that we may lead a peaceful and quiet life, godly and dignified in every way. – 1 Timothy 2:1-2 (ESV)

We also must pray for our nation, for whomever sits in the seat of executive power wields great influence and has much power, even in our system of checks and balances. The President influences by executive order, through the appointments of judicial officers, and by the signing of bills provided by the Congress. These are decisions and actions that will not only affect each citizen currently alive, but those yet to be born for years to come.

Prayer is not passive. It is an active response and in truth, a preemptive strike on evil and sin.

So pray for the President...even if you didn't vote for him and do not personally like him or his policies.

We must proclaim truth. Within our great experimental republic, we have not only the right, but the expectation to be Christ’s church in the public square. Whether it is speaking out against issues or laws that denigrate or eliminate life when deemed inconvenient, or items that perpetuate systemic practices that keep one people group at bay while another experiences more freedoms, Christians must be united biblically for the sake of the gospel and for the glory of God.

Speaking against atrocities must be preceded by speaking truth. The gospel is not meant to be kept secret and though the world may ignore, get angry, accuse, and push Christians aside, we must realize that our calling requires us, in love, to not remain silent.

Speaking truth means having the courage to speak when pressure is great, potential fallout is real, and when it pushes against the political narrative of the party in power (even if it is your declared party.) Remember, our allegiance is first to the Lord.

We must participate. What if Christians were united with each other as brothers and sisters in Christ rather than simply upon a designated political issue? What if participation as Christ’s church meant that believers actually sought unity that is provided in Christ? Unity in Christ will not occur naturally. We will not drift toward this. We must be active participants, as individuals and as local churches, for God’s sake, regardless who is in the White House.

Some say that there is too much water under the bridge, too many historic errors done in the name of the church, that we are too far gone. Yet, I go to Christ’s prayer in the Gospel of John and recognize that since then, he has been interceding on behalf of you and me.

“I do not ask for these only, but also for those who will believe in me through their word, that they may all be one, just as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be in us, so that the world may believe that you have sent me. The glory that you have given me I have given to them, that they may be one even as we are one, I in them and you in me, that they may become perfectly one, so that the world may know that you sent me and loved them even as you loved me.” – John 17:20-23 ESV

Apparently, Christ believes that we truly can be one in him.

So, after this election (and I would say, let’s not wait) the calling for Christ’s church is to remember that we are placed here as light in the darkness, to point others toward the One who is the Way, Truth, and Life. If we’re not careful, we may forget in the midst of political machinations, coronavirus updates, and daily reminders of protests, demonstrations, lawlessness, and death, that Christ is our King. He reigns supremely.

The winner in November will not change that.

So, pray, proclaim, and participate in unity for the sake of the gospel.

Our faith must solely be in the King of kings, Lord of lords. Christ alone. Living as citizens of His kingdom first must guide how we live here, and how we respond when everything does not go the way we desire.

By the way – I have posted this article twice, once with Trump in the title. Once with Biden. The articles are identical other than that. Why? Because I know some may read it based on who is listed in the title, but I believe the church’s response remains consistent regardless who wins.


Celebrating Others Failures Is Not a Commendable Trait

Perhaps it is simply human nature?

Maybe it is the deeply held desire to feel good about oneself?

It could be that as long as we find someone else who is a worse person than we are, we deprives ourselves of acknowledging our own depravity?

The latest story that has trended throughout social media, become fodder for the mainstream media, and gets talked about over coffee by Christians and non-Christians alike began unfolding years ago. Then, last Sunday, a public statement made by a university president changed everything and . . . BOOM! More press releases. More stories. More accusations. More admissions. More denials. And ... I don't think the final layer of this onion has been peeled.

Thanks to the current state of politi-vangelicalism (I made up that word - a mashup of political and evangelical) that exists in our nation right now, to speak of any individual claiming, either willingly or unwillingly, a political or evangelical leadership title often either garners likes and shares or nasty statements. It is not that this is new, but with social media and instant news, it just happens quickly and more publicly now.

Thus, when Jerry Falwell, Jr.'s revelations of sinful indiscretions involving his wife, another man, and himself became more than rumors (at least some of them) and have been affirmed to be accurate, the flood of responses and shares began. 

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Photo credit: VisualHunt / CC BY

Some of a certain age are likening Falwell's revelation to those of the late 1980s involving prominent televangelists. Others are pointing to the power structures that not only allowed, but enabled such things to happen and continue happening for years. In the age of #MeToo and #ChurchToo, Falwell's story sadly becomes another of many.

Condemnation Aplenty

There are variations of responses appearing such as "Serves him right," "He's blaming his wife?" "He has no ethics," and "It's abuse of power, abuse of authority, abuse sexually, etc." 

Of course, there are others who due to their longtime support and views of the individual (or perhaps his father or Liberty University) blame it all on conspiracies, politics, anti-Christian groups, or any number of other people or circumstances.

Even Christians (and I'm not immune to this) often vent online when others fall. If we're not careful, we do more than vent. We actually may celebrate the downfall of others, especially those who claim to be followers of Christ as well.

But, celebrating the failures of others, especially those who at least publicly claim to be followers of Christ, is not the best, right, or biblical response. However, it is my most common response, but that does not make it right. Therefore, I read this verse in Proverbs and respond with repentance.

"He who is glad at calamity will not go unpunished." - Proverbs 17:5b (ESV)

Some Get It Right

Then, hidden deep within the comment thread on stories about Falwell, every now and then, we see things said that just do not get the likes or shares that others do. 

In the midst of this tragic, sinful, abhorrent reveal that continues to be shared, there are those who are clearly not excusing the sin, not seeking an avoidance of justice, are calling for repentance, and who actually believe consequences should be faced, but are...get this...stating that they are praying for ALL involved and seeking God in the midst of these people.

In today's culture of offering "thoughts and prayers" (which has become a punchline for jokes - and in the way that many use the term, it should be a punchline) some are truly offering God-focused, biblically-accurate, grace-filled, justice-seeking, consequence-acknowledging (YES - THERE MUST BE CONSEQUENCES), condemnation-removing (Romans 8:1), repentance-desiring, intercession for Jerry Falwell, Jr., his wife, their acquaintances, and all others involved either directly or indirectly with these heinous accounts now made public.

Praying for Sinners Is Not Excusing Their Sin

I fear that all too often we wrongly believe praying for those who have done despicable things is excusing their sins. It is not.

Jesus prayed for those who put him to death on the cross. When he prayed "Father, forgive them for they know not what they do" he was NOT saying "You know, it's no big deal what they have done. It's all good."

When Stephen prayed that God would forgive those who would soon put him to death by stoning, it was not weakness on display, but grief over lost religious people who acted in ways that dishonored God, put his name to shame, and hurt the cause of Christ. 

Terrible People Who Get What They Deserve

Some believe that Falwell's failures will negatively impact the cause of Christ for decades to come. I tend to believe that God is bigger than a university president, even one who led a university founded on biblical principles. God was not surprised when Falwell's failures became public. He knew when the sins happened. He knew when the sins would be made public. He also knows what will occur next.

As a Christian, I must confess, it is much easier to pile on the story and jump in on the "He is a terrible person and is getting what he deserves!" mantra. Truth be told - he is a terrible person and is getting what he deserves.

More than that, I am reminded that apart from the redeeming and gracious rescue by Christ in my life, I am a terrible person. So are you.

As it is written: “None is righteous, no, not one." - Romans 3:10 (ESV)

You see, it is easy to feel righteous as long as you compare yourself to someone who is easily seen to be worse morally than others. 

But, what about when we compare ourselves to the one whom we are called to follow and be like? Compared to Christ, I am reminded daily that "but for the grace of God, go I." 

When it comes to Jerry Falwell, Jr., I have opinions. Just like you do. He should not be leading Liberty University (or any university.) I do not believe he should be platformed.

He would be wise to get off Twitter and to stay out of the public eye for a season (perhaps a very long one.) I pray that he seeks God personally, privately, and honestly. I am praying that he discovers the great relief of forgiveness offered to those who are in Christ and repent. I pray he does this for real, and not as a Christian publicity move. I pray for his wife to do the same.

I pray that they realize they are not too far gone for God's grace to reach.

I pray that somehow their marriage survives and that it is nothing like it was prior (according to his own admission and other reports) but that God heals them both. I pray for their family...and for those who are part of this story in other ways as well.

And, no, praying for them does not excuse sin. It does not minimize it either.

Can God fix this? Certainly. I know he desires to do so. God won't for the sake of "good PR" however. He will do so only for his own glory.

Oh...and pray for Liberty University. This is a new day for the school. They have needed new leadership for years. They now have it. Despite the past, the future can look bright - but it starts at the top.


When You Feel Like a Political Orphan

Welcome to 2020, the gift that just keeps on giving. Way back (about 3,000 days ago) on January 1, there was much optimism from many for this year. Of course, in the United States, we were just getting started in what we knew would be a stressful, if not entertaining election year. Then, we entered the pandemic, followed by racially focused protests, riots, murder hornets, and the upending of everything that was considered "normal."

But at least the political machines would keep moving. Whoo hoo!

I have always been a political junkie. I read biographies, watch historical documentaries, and stay up late viewing the returns on election day like some watch the Super Bowl.

The Worst Political Divide in US History

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Photo credit: Sean McMenemy on VisualHunt.com / CC BY

We are now entering the homestretch of election year 2020. The two major political parties in our nation are pulling no punches in addressing their base and the coveted "middle-of-the-road" voters. Attack ads have been the norm since...well, since perhaps the late 1700s. It just seems that it is worse now than ever. 

I have had conversations with friends who have stated as much.

They say things like, "We are more polarized in this nation than ever before in our history." I smile and usually respond with, "Well, maybe not. There was this little thing called the Civil War that seems to show that our nation actually was a bit more divided in the past than we are now." Then, I repent for being snarky.

When the conversations drift toward frustrations over presidential elections, perceived corruption, unqualified and unlikable candidates, political backroom machinations, and other similar things, I encourage my friends to go online and read a bit about the 1876 presidential election between Samuel Tilden and Rutherford B. Hayes. I know other people don't tend to care so much about history, but it helps to gain a bit of perspective when we think our experiences are the worst in our nation's short history.

When You Merge Politics and Religion You Get Politics

Growing up in a Baptist church, I remember hearing pastors and church members share their positions on political matters. As a child, I did not pick up on them as quickly, but as I grew older, it became clear that the church was not devoid of political posturing, either by local candidates or those who became vocal evangelists every four years (not for their faith, but for their party of choice.) 

In the late 1970s and early 1980s the politically religious categorization seemed to truly solidify in the churches our family attended. Later, the polarity became more pronounced on pro-life issues. Within the evangelical world, party platforms became the litmus test for affirmation and the anti-abortion issue was paramount. It remains so. To be clear, I am pro-life, believing that life begins at conception, so this issue is a major one for me.

While the pro-life issue is a primary issue for most (those on both sides of the issue) there are other issues, platform statements, ideology, interpretations of the US Constitution, and integrity of candidates that drive many voters. Between the far-right and far-left contingencies is a middle group that may or may not be registered as a certain political party, but for decades has been the group candidates and parties target. In this middle group, as surprising as it may seem to some, are people who are redeemed by the blood of Christ, active in their Bible-believing, gospel-centric churches, committed to a biblical worldview, and seeking to live transformed lives for the glory of God and the good of themselves and their neighbors.

Yes, that means there will be someone in heaven with you (if you are a Christian) who did not vote exactly as you did for every election!

Vote Your My Values

The "Vote Your Values" theme has been used for years. There is even a website and group titled this focused on what is deemed "Judeo-Christian Values." I do not dislike this, but I must admit that when I want people to vote their values, I actually want them to vote my values. That is because I believe I am right. Do you know anyone like that?

Values matter to me.

As a Christian, I unapologetically care about issues from what I deem a biblical worldview. I see that there are numerous things that truly matter and no individual politician, or party lands well on all issues. That has always been true. I know that, but with the advent of social media and instant information through tweets and push notifications, it is more clear now than ever. 

Politically Homeless

What happens when you just do not like (that may be the wrong word...perhaps "line up with" or "approve" would be better) the only candidates available on the ballot? Like me.

Some choose to vote for a third party, knowing their selected individual has no real chance of winning, especially in national elections. In local elections, it is often true as well, but not always. To vote this way may be honorable, but results in others angrily stating "You wasted your vote! You're a bad American!" 

Lovely.

The concept of feeling "politically homeless" has popped up in numerous places recently. Those who dare to declare they feel politically homeless often are met with typically polarized responses of anger or approval.

Some of the tweets shared earlier this year resonate with me and echo the feelings that I and many Christians now have.

 

Being politically homeless, or a political orphan is not a bad thing (unless you're running for office.) Though I have been registered as a party voter in my state for years and at this point don't plan to change that, though I may at some point in the future choose to remove any party affiliation from my registration. I know, just by making that statement may lead many in my church to be offended, want to leave, actually leave, or worse...just stop viewing me as biblically sound. I may regret stating this publicly (but I doubt it.) 

Years ago, I made the decision to no longer put signs in my yard or political stickers on my vehicles. It is not that I do not have strong beliefs and leanings related to whom I will vote, it is more that I choose not to eliminate an opportunity to have a gospel conversation with someone simply related to politics. Kingdom work trumps political promotion. 

Some declare me to be too conservative to be progressive, while others say I'm too progressive to be conservative. 

I am conservative. I am very conservative, but unlike many I know what I seek to conserve. To be called progressive by some is interesting to me. It's not a term I would use, but nonetheless I have heard this. "Progressive" is like the term "contemporary" when defining a church's music style. One church's "contemporary service" is another's "traditional service." (FYI - just adding a drum set does not make you contemporary.) So, "progressive" not unlike many other terms is defined by the user more often than not. Some may even call me a liberal. Uh...no. That's ridiculous.

To be in the public eye, even as a local church pastor, is to be called things by some who do not truly know you and ultimately just don't like you (for various reasons.) 

Evangelistic...But Not Politically "Evangelical"

Words matter.

I actually like the word "evangelical" but I fear we may have to abandon it in coming years. I have found in conversations with others that outside the confines of what we had termed "evangelical Christianity" the term is believed by many to be a synonym of a political party. And...as stated earlier, when you mix religion and politics, you get politics. I wonder if the term "evangelical" will eliminate the evangelistic conversations from occurring in certain areas where we seek to make Christ known and increase his Kingdom. If so, we need another word and I am up for suggestions.

We must be evangelistic, fulfilling God's great commission and greatest commandment, even if we cannot call ourselves evangelical.

Be a Good American - Go Vote

I do believe it is not only our right and privilege, but our responsibility to participate in the electoral process in our nation. As flawed and broken as it may seem, it remains an amazing gift to the citizens of our nation. To forsake one's constitutional right to participate is wrong, in my opinion. So many around the world would love to have such a right.

As election day nears, and the signs accumulate on every street corner in your community reminding you that every single candidate is the only answer to the problems of our world, pray over whom God would have you support. Trust him with the process and even as a homeless, political orphan, let your voice be heard (even if silently at a voter's booth in your precinct.) It does matter. 

For whom should you vote? 

It may seem obvious to you. Congratulations.

It may be something you are wrestling over. Welcome to the club.

Pray. Seek God's lead. Trust him.

Then fill out that ballot or check that box. 

And after the votes are tallied...

Pray. Seek God's lead. Trust him.


Praise God.......for the Pandemic?!?

Let me make this clear at the outset, I know this coronavirus pandemic has left many people hurting in many ways. In no way am I minimizing the grief of those who have had loved ones die of COVID-19. Those who have lost their jobs, their businesses, and have been impacted in such drastic, negative ways are to be grieved with, cared for, and served well by the church during these days. I have written prior about not wasting the pandemic here

If we are not careful, not only will we (the church) waste the pandemic and what God is actually providing through this, we may find ourselves sitting on the sidelines simply hoping we can get back to a predefined concept of "normal" that just looks like the February 2020 version of church. 

There is a difference between not wasting a difficulty and actually praising God in the midst of it.

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Why Praise Him for This?

The simple answer is that as Christians we are to always praise God. You know...we're just supposed to do this.

Yet, that sounds like little more than a verse-a-day, sugary-sweet-religiosity, fake-it-til-you-make-it instruction. It doesn't make the answer wrong, but we may just need a reminder of the why.

David, the king, man after God's own heart, forgiven and redeemed one, and psalmist, continued to come back to God in the midst of the most tumultuous times of his life. Whether it was being hunted down by a jealous king, hiding from a deceitful son, battles with enemy nations, or struggles with his own lust and sinful actions, he would come to a point, followed by repentance, where he would praise God.

I will bless the Lord at all times; his praise shall continually be in my mouth. My soul makes its boast in the Lord; let the humble hear and be glad. Oh, magnify the Lord with me, and let us exalt his name together! - Psalm 34:1-3 (ESV)

There are numerous other passages where the Holy Spirit inspired the writers to extol the need to praise and trust God in the midst of all difficulties. Here are just a few...

When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; and through the rivers, they shall not overwhelm you; when you walk through fire you shall not be burned, and the flame shall not consume you. - Isaiah 43:2 (ESV)

Not only that, but we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope. - Romans 5:3-4 (ESV)

For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us. - Romans 8:18 (ESV)

We praise him in the midst of the pandemic because we know he is doing a great work (we may need to be continually reminded of this–those in the Scripture had to be reminded all the time, too,) which at this point is veiled from our view and our comprehension. To believe otherwise, is to ignore the sovereignty of God.

We Prayed for This?

You may be saying "I never prayed for a pandemic." Well, who would? But I know many believers who have been praying for years that revival and renewal would occur within the church and our communities. 

Additionally, many pastors, including me, have often looked at their church's calendar of ministry events, including Sunday gatherings, life groups, committee meetings, camps, mission trips, children's activities, youth activities, women's meetings, men's meetings, fellowships, choir concerts, etc. and have recognized that as years go by, more and more things get placed on the schedule, while few ever get removed.

Even ministries that were no longer effective, have outlived their shelf life, or were vital for a long ago season tend to remain in some form on the church's calendar. The cry "We've never done it this way before" regarding new ideas may be true, but just as true is the cry "We've always done this" as it relates to scheduled events.

Due to full calendars of ministry minutia, pastors and ministry leaders found themselves doing less ministry and more managing of events and activities. While these events and ministries are not necessarily bad and in many cases made for great memories while aiding in leading people to know Christ and live faithfully, they became sidebars of busyness that kept disciple-makers from making disciples.

The minutia of ministry management became the machine requiring constant monitoring and marketing.

So in addition to praying for renewal and a season of awakening and revival, we prayed for our church calendars. Okay, maybe it was just me praying. My prayer went something like this - "Dear God. Please lead us to a place where we can ensure the mission of the church remains paramount, that glorifying you is occurring, that we are faithful in reaching the lost, equipping the saints, and making disciples. Please release us from the overwhelming busyness that comes from just managing the organization of the church to the desires of all members based on what they want, what they grew up with, and what they desire their children to experience. Amen."

And...well...God answered.

Sometime in March 2020 he moved us, along with everyone else, into a moment of PAUSE. We stopped. "It was just temporary," we thought. "It will just be for a few days or at the most a couple of weeks," we hoped.

Now, we're over five months into this age of new rules, regulations, requirements, and suggestions. Churches, for the most part, are not gathering as they did in February. Most have found ways to move to online services. Some are gathering in person, but with strict regulations in place. Hardly any church is offering children's or preschool groups. Every church is suddenly a family-integrated one. There are some who meet in person with no guidelines, defying laws (deemed unjust by the church leaders) of their region.

It's a new day.

But you know what? Since we have all these new things to be concerned about, we're not worried about all those little events that used to be on the calendar.

Though it is definitely not how I expected, nor how I desired God to answer, he apparently has. We (our church staff) are continually looking at new, creative, safe, biblically-sound ways to gather, to educate, to comfort, to serve, and to equip our church members during these days.

While we make decisions now that are not always met with exciting approval by all church members (that's no different than pre-COVID,) we have been able to offer more clarity into why and how we do what we do (and ultimately for Whom we do things) for our church members. The calendar has been erased and I will continue to focus our efforts in such a way that we just don't try to re-fill it with all the pre-COVID events and activities.

If we are not careful, ministers and leaders of ministries (e.g. choirs, age-graded ministries, etc.) will default to just trying to get their one area of ministry back in place. This is a wrong-minded way of serving the church and we all must push against this natural desire. There is a bigger story playing out here.

As I heard from a friend earlier this week, it seems the church growth movement of the 1970s and 1980s (even with all its faults and miscues) led naturally to the missional church movement of the early 2000s. Being missional prepared us for this moment in church life. I'm not sure what we will call it. Will Mancini speaks of it as "Future Church" and quoting Reggie McNeal, this is the "The Present Future." 

I don't think the church could effectively serve in this COVID era apart from spending a season in the missional era. The jump from "church-growth" to current era is too hard, too challenging, too much for many. Those churches who never embraced missional living are suffering more now. The missional church shifts the focus from "the church has a mission" to "God's mission has his church." 

So, we praise God and thank him for the pandemic. Why? Because in this challenging and frustrating time, God has been and continues to equip his always prevailing church for his mission. His mission is not equal to filling our calendars with religious and churchy stuff, but in equipping the saints and making disciples who make disciples. 

Now, more than ever, your community needs your church...even if you can't meet in the building together.

Praying Normal Never Returns

I have had to tell friends, staff members, church members, and others numerous times over the past few weeks that "normal" is not returning, so quick pining for it. Those holding out for a return to "normal" are in for a rude awakening. The changes we have experienced have impacted us permanently. It is not unlike the differences in air travel in the US from pre-9/11 to post-9/11. While things have loosened and changed a bit over the years, certain changes have remained. They have become the new normal.

This means that for years to come, some will always wear face masks in public (even if not mandated.) Hand sanitizer will continue to sell well. There will not be a mass removal of plastic shields around cash registers in grocery stores and restaurants. The buffet restaurants may never return (this is not a bad thing.) And...most churches will continue to offer some form of online service and video-conference life groups (this is not a bad thing, either.)

Will You Pray?

Are you bold enough to join me in this prayer? Will you ask God to ensure your church never returns to the February 2020 version of "normal."

For God has paused us for a purpose.

He has shaken us from our complacency.

We must cease saying "Woe is us" and lamenting our changed state of normalcy and say "Praise God" that he is not only seeing us through this valley, but has us here for a greater cause.

Praise God for the pandemic. May all that we are suffering through be used for his glory and our good. May we love God well and our neighbors as ourselves.